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Absence of the Asian-specific region V mitochondrial marker in Native Beringians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224068
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1992 Apr;50(4):758-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
G F Shields
K. Hecker
M I Voevoda
J K Reed
Author Affiliation
Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks.
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1992 Apr;50(4):758-65
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Asia, Central - ethnology
Base Sequence
Chromosome Deletion
DNA Probes - diagnostic use
DNA, Mitochondrial - analysis - genetics
Far East - ethnology
Genetic Markers - genetics
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymerase Chain Reaction
USSR - ethnology
Abstract
The Asian-specific 9-bp deletion between the genes for mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase II and lysine transfer RNA has been used to trace aboriginal human movements out of Southeast Asia and into portions of the South Pacific. Although it has been used to estimate the number of independent lineages that occur in the New World, it has not been studied in native peoples of the Beringian region. Thus, we have used PCR to amplify and compare the lengths of DNA segments surrounding this deletion in native peoples of Beringia and the adjacent regions, as well as natives of the Altai Mountains of Southwestern Siberia. Of the 176 individuals analyzed here, the deletion was found in only 3 of 25 individuals from the Ust-Kan region of the Altai Mountains. We comment on the distribution of this marker and on potential relationships between Beringians and other Native American groups in which this marker has been surveyed. One Chukchi possessed three copies of the 9-bp sequence, which suggests (1) that the number of copies of this sequence in humans may be more variable than had been believed and (2) that a mechanism of replication based on tandem duplication may be a potential explanation for the origin of this length mutation in humans.
Notes
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PubMed ID
1550120 View in PubMed
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[Achievements and prospects of the development of cardiology in Siberia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55661
Source
Kardiologiia. 1985 Oct;25(10):117-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1985
Author
A I Potapov
R S Karpov
Source
Kardiologiia. 1985 Oct;25(10):117-23
Date
Oct-1985
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coronary Disease - prevention & control - therapy
English Abstract
Far East
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Hypertension - prevention & control - therapy
Regional Medical Programs - organization & administration
Siberia
Abstract
Achievements of Siberian cardiologists in the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease are described with reference to specific conditions of Siberia and the Far East. Research priorities, such as problems of combined prophylaxis and the development of new methods for preventive check-ups of the population in Siberia are discussed.
PubMed ID
4087648 View in PubMed
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[Additional hosts of tapeworms and factors in the transmission of diphyllobothriasis in the Lower Priamur region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239073
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1985 Mar-Apr;(2):24-8
Publication Type
Article

Airborne biogenic particles in the snow of the cities of the Russian Far East as potential allergic compounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262711
Source
J Immunol Res. 2014;2014:141378
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Kirill S Golokhvast
Source
J Immunol Res. 2014;2014:141378
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Allergens - adverse effects - analysis
Animals
Cities
Environmental monitoring
Far East
Humans
Particulate Matter - adverse effects - analysis
Risk factors
Russia
Snow
Abstract
This paper presents an analysis of airborne biogenic particles (1 mkm-1 mm) found in the snow in several cities of the Russian Far East during 2010-2013. The most common was vegetational terraneous detritus (fragments of tree and grass leaves) followed by animal hair, small insects and their fragments, microorganisms of aeroplankton, and equivocal biological garbage. Specific components were found in samples from locations close to bodies of water such as fragments of algae and mollusc shells and, marine invertebrates (needles of sea urchins and shell debris of arthropods). In most locations across the Far East (Vladivostok, Khabarovsk, Blagoveshchensk, and Ussuriysk), the content of biogenic particles collected in the winter did not exceed 10% of the total particulate matter, with the exception of Birobidzhan and the nature reserve Bastak, where it made up to 20%. Most of all biogenic compounds should be allergic: hair, fragments of tree and grass leaves, insects, and microorganisms.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25140327 View in PubMed
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[All-Union conference on "Medico-biological aspects of mental health protection"].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227686
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1991;91(2):141-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991

Analysis of East Asia genetic substructure using genome-wide SNP arrays.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153881
Source
PLoS One. 2008;3(12):e3862
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Chao Tian
Roman Kosoy
Annette Lee
Michael Ransom
John W Belmont
Peter K Gregersen
Michael F Seldin
Author Affiliation
Department of Biochemistry, Rowe Program in Human Genetics, University of California Davis, Davis, California, United States of America.
Source
PLoS One. 2008;3(12):e3862
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Far East - ethnology
Genetic Markers - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetics, Population
Genome, Human
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Humans
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Principal Component Analysis
Abstract
Accounting for population genetic substructure is important in reducing type 1 errors in genetic studies of complex disease. As efforts to understand complex genetic disease are expanded to different continental populations the understanding of genetic substructure within these continents will be useful in design and execution of association tests. In this study, population differentiation (Fst) and Principal Components Analyses (PCA) are examined using >200 K genotypes from multiple populations of East Asian ancestry. The population groups included those from the Human Genome Diversity Panel [Cambodian, Yi, Daur, Mongolian, Lahu, Dai, Hezhen, Miaozu, Naxi, Oroqen, She, Tu, Tujia, Naxi, Xibo, and Yakut], HapMap [ Han Chinese (CHB) and Japanese (JPT)], and East Asian or East Asian American subjects of Vietnamese, Korean, Filipino and Chinese ancestry. Paired Fst (Wei and Cockerham) showed close relationships between CHB and several large East Asian population groups (CHB/Korean, 0.0019; CHB/JPT, 00651; CHB/Vietnamese, 0.0065) with larger separation with Filipino (CHB/Filipino, 0.014). Low levels of differentiation were also observed between Dai and Vietnamese (0.0045) and between Vietnamese and Cambodian (0.0062). Similarly, small Fst's were observed among different presumed Han Chinese populations originating in different regions of mainland of China and Taiwan (Fst's
Notes
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PubMed ID
19057645 View in PubMed
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An analysis on life expectancy of the world population and trend of increase in China's life expectancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69224
Source
Popul Res. 1987 Apr;4(2):32-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1987
Author
Q. Xu
Source
Popul Res. 1987 Apr;4(2):32-40
Date
Apr-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asia
China
Comparative Study
Demography
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Economics
Far East
Forecasting
Life expectancy
Longevity
Mortality
Population
Population Characteristics
Population Dynamics
Research
Social Change
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics
Urban Population
Abstract
Life expectancy is postively correlated with the per capita gross national product (GNP). There are exceptions, such as Qatar, which has a very high per capita GNP, but a life expectancy over 10 years less than the average level of developing countries. Also, in Sri Lanka, there is a relatively long life expectancy but low per capita GNP. Japan and Iceland have the longest life expectancy in the world, even though neither has the world's highest GNP. Life expectancy has been growing in developed countries since the beginning of the 1900s; presently it is relatively stable (70-75 years). Life expectancy in developing countries is growing fast. The world has experienced a "population explosion," but, because of birth control measures, the world population should stabilize gradually in the next century. Life expectancy is expected to keep increasing. Medical developments contribute to greater life expectancy. The 1st life-span revolution occurred in 1776 when the smallpox vaccine was developed; the 2nd occurred with the discovery of antibiotics in the early 1950s. According to World Health Organization estimates, life expectancy in developed countries should reach 75-80 years by the end of the century. In 1981 China's life expectancy was 67.9 years. According to a UN model, China's life expectancy will reach 73 years by 2000. Life expectancy is associated with not only the economy, but also social, cultural, and environmental factors. The favorable noneconomic factors which have helped to decrease mortality and increase life expectancy in China include 1) the socialist system which provides a moderate living for all and has developed the health care system; 2) widespread and longtime use of traditional medicine; 3) the oriental culture and ethnic group; and 4) the fact that in some developed countries with a low level of urbanization, life expectancy exceeds 70 years (China's urban population will be 40% by the year 2000). The author expects that China will only reach a life expectancy of 71-72 years by 2000. However, the 2nd strategic goal of China's economic development is to attain or surpass the world's advanced level in 30-50 years. Thus, China's life expectancy should reach 75 years by 2020, 78 by 2040, and nearly 80 by 2060.
PubMed ID
12281039 View in PubMed
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An essay on social transition and ethnographies

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102054
Source
Social Transition in the North, Working Papers, Vol. 1, No. 1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 An Essay on Social Transition and Ethnographies Overview This study we have embarked on (A Comparative Study of Social Transition in the Norrh: Alaska and Russian Far East) poses several tough challenges. It is a multi- disciplinary project and the underlying assumptions and customary
  1 document  
Author
McNabb, SL
Author Affiliation
Social Research Institute, Anchorage, AK
Source
Social Transition in the North, Working Papers, Vol. 1, No. 1
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Allied social science
Ethnography
Research process
Russian Far East
U.S.
Abstract
This study we have embarked on (A Comparative Study of Social Transition in the North: Alaska and Russian Far East) poses several tough challenges. It is a multidisciplinary project, and the underlying assumptions and customary methods of inquiry of the researchers are not uniform. The aim of this brief essay is to cut through some of those challenges and complexities and describe our first step in the research process.
Notes
The entire collection of working papers from the Social Transition in the North project is available at UAA Archives & Special Collections in the Consortium Library.
Documents

STN_Vol 1_No 1_An Essay on Social Transition and Ethnograp.pdf

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Source
Taehan Pinyogikwa Hakhoe Chapchi. 1976 Mar;17(1):49-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1976
Author
H Y Lee
Source
Taehan Pinyogikwa Hakhoe Chapchi. 1976 Mar;17(1):49-62
Date
Mar-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia
Antibodies
Asia
Asia, Southeastern
Autoimmunity
Congresses
Contraception
Denmark
Developing Countries
England
Epididymitis
Europe
Evaluation Studies
Family Planning Services
Far East
Granuloma
Great Britain
Hematoma
Hemorrhage
India
Infection
Japan
Korea
North America
Pain
Psychology
Semen
Sexual Behavior
Sperm Count
Spermatogenesis-Blocking Agents
Sterilization Reversal
Sterilization, Reproductive
Surgery
Therapeutics
United States
Urologic Surgical Procedures, Male
Vasectomy
Abstract
In Korea as in many other nations vasectomy as a male sterilization has become more popular as a method of planned parenthood. In this overview of male sterilization emphasis is on the mainly technical aspects of the ordinary vasectomy and vasovasostomy. Although the principle of vasectomy is the same, many different techniques have been reported and used. Specific differences are found in techniques for immobilizing the vas, for making the scrotal incision, for treating the cut ends of vasa, and for removing segments of vas. Attention is given to some important factors so as to provide complete protection against the passage of sperm without any failure and to improve the chances of later reversibility. The following aspects of ordinary vasectomy procedure are reviewed: ideal operative level, local anesthesia, immobilization of the vas, skin incision, isolation of the vas, treatment of the cut ends of vasa, prevention of hematoma formation, disappearance rate of residual sperm, immediate sterility technique, complications, psychological effects, and antibodies following vasectomy. In relation to vasovasostomy, numerous factors such as operative techniques, splint, various factors for the successful operation, overall success rates and low pregnancy rates are discussed and compared to this author's series.
PubMed ID
12179579 View in PubMed
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196 records – page 1 of 20.