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160 records – page 1 of 16.

Accepting parental responsibility: "future questioning" as a means to avoid foster home placement of children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224567
Source
Child Welfare. 1992 Jan-Feb;71(1):3-17
Publication Type
Article

Admitting whole families: an alternative to residential care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230042
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Oct;34(7):694-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1989
Author
B J Dydyk
G. French
C. Gertsman
N. Morrison
I. O'Neill
Author Affiliation
INTERFACE, Thistletown Regional Centre, Rexdale, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Oct;34(7):694-9
Date
Oct-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - psychology - therapy
Cost Control
Family Therapy - methods
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Ontario
Patient Admission - economics
Residential Treatment - economics
Abstract
This paper is an examination of the effectiveness of a programme (described in detail elsewhere) designed to admit whole families for short-term intensive assessment and treatment. The goals of this programme are to eliminate residential care for symptomatic children who are admitted with their families to this service, to decrease the length of stay of the symptomatic child in residential treatment, if this is required following admission of the whole family to this unit, and to provide these services at costs comparable to or less than that currently being spent with conventional residential treatment. Results stemming from a number of pre- and post-treatment measures indicate that one half of the children initially assessed and recommended for inpatient treatment had successfully avoided inpatient treatment for six months following admission of their family to this unit. For children recommended for residential care after admission of their families to the family unit, a reduction of approximately 35% of total time in residence occurred (when compared with a comparison group). A cost saving of over +12,000 per case was realized as a result of admission of the whole family when compared with residential treatment.
PubMed ID
2804880 View in PubMed
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Africentric youth and family rites of passage program: promoting resilience among at-risk African American youths.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181524
Source
Soc Work. 2004 Jan;49(1):65-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Aminifu R Harvey
Robert B Hill
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, University of Maryland at Baltimore, 21201-1777, USA. Aharvey@ssw.umaryland.edu
Source
Soc Work. 2004 Jan;49(1):65-74
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
African Americans - psychology
Ceremonial Behavior
Child
District of Columbia
Family Therapy
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - rehabilitation
Male
Program Evaluation
Social Identification
Social Work - methods
Abstract
This article examines the effects of an Africentric youth and family rites of passage program on at-risk African American youths and their parents. Data were obtained from a three-year evaluation of a youth rites of passage demonstration project using therapeutic interventions based on Africentric principles. At-risk African American boys between ages 11.5 and 14.5 years with no history of substance abuse were referred from the criminal justice system, diversion programs, and local schools. The evaluation revealed that participating youths exhibited gains in self-esteem and accurate knowledge of the dangers of drug abuse. Although the differences were not statistically significant, parents demonstrated improvements in parenting skills, racial identity, cultural awareness, and community involvement. Evidence from interviews and focus groups suggests that the program's holistic, family-oriented, Africentric, strengths-based approach and indigenous staff contributed to its success.
PubMed ID
14964519 View in PubMed
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Source
Child Care Health Dev. 1985 Nov-Dec;11(6):355-73
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Elston
J B Thomas
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 1985 Nov-Dec;11(6):355-73
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Anorexia Nervosa - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Behavior Therapy
Body Image
Child
Culture
Family
Family Therapy
Female
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Prognosis
Psychological Theory
Psychotherapy
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Puberty
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
This paper, following a brief historical note, reviews the literature on anorexia nervosa. It begins by describing the characteristics of the syndrome and then considers incidence, aetiology and treatment. The results of treatment are described and the paper concludes by attempting a prognosis for those who are diagnosed anorexic. The authors are eclectic in their literature survey and also present some experience collected in a hospital school. The paper is intended as a teaching synthesis for clinicians new to this area or for those seeking a brief introduction to the present 'state of the art' in theory and practice.
PubMed ID
3907882 View in PubMed
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Approaching the incestuous and sexually abusive family.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241598
Source
J Adolesc. 1983 Sep;6(3):229-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1983
Author
D. Will
Source
J Adolesc. 1983 Sep;6(3):229-46
Date
Sep-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence
Family
Family Therapy - methods
Female
Gender Identity
Homeostasis
Humans
Incest
Male
Marriage
Ontario
Risk
Scotland
Social Isolation
Social Work
Abstract
This paper reviews family transactional theories of incest and sexual abuse. Two main types of family are described: the chaotic family and the "endogamous" incestuous family. Some general features of incestuous and sexually abusive families are then discussed, after which some basic principles of clinical work with such families are considered.
PubMed ID
6643801 View in PubMed
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Aspects of consumer satisfaction with brief family therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247986
Source
Fam Process. 1978 Dec;17(4):399-407
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1978
Author
C A Woodward
J. Santa-Barbara
S. Levin
N B Epstein
Source
Fam Process. 1978 Dec;17(4):399-407
Date
Dec-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - therapy
Consumer Satisfaction
Delivery of Health Care
Family Therapy - methods
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Learning Disorders - therapy
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Psychotherapy, Brief - methods
Abstract
In an evaluative study of brief family therapy, 279 families were administered a Family Satisfaction Questionnaire in their own homes, six months after treatment terminated. This questionnaire was designed to assess several aspects of the families' satisfaction with services received. The identified patient in all families was a child with academic and/or behavioral problems at school. A variety of outcome measures were also obtained both at treatment termination and at the six-month follow-up. Families were generally satisfied with the overall services received but expressed widely varying degrees of satisfaction with various aspects of treatment. Very little dissatisfaction was expressed regarding the availability of services (less than 7 per cent), but a sizeable proportion of families (45 per cent) did not feel that the services provided were comprehensive and adequate. Despite concerns regarding comprehensiveness and adequacy of the service, the majority of families were functioning well at the time of follow-up as assessed by a number of independent measures. Global satisfaction should not be regarded as the only index of treatment effectiveness, as many families who were dissatisfied experienced successful treatment outcomes.
PubMed ID
751810 View in PubMed
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Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1993 Jan;44(1):81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1993
Author
L. Jerome
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1993 Jan;44(1):81
Date
Jan-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Family Therapy
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Ontario
Patient care team
Personality Assessment
Telecommunications
Television
Notes
Comment On: Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1992 Jan;43(1):25-321544643
PubMed ID
8436369 View in PubMed
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[Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: problems in a family and family therapy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143771
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2010;110(1):89-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010

Benefits of a brief therapeutic conversation intervention for families of children and adolescents in active cancer treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256988
Source
Oncol Nurs Forum. 2013 Sep;40(5):E346-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Erla Kolbrun Svavarsdottir
Anna Olafia Sigurdardottir
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Oncol Nurs Forum. 2013 Sep;40(5):E346-57
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Caregivers - psychology
Child
Child, Preschool
Family Therapy - methods
Female
Humans
Iceland
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - nursing - psychology - therapy
Nurse's Role
Oncology Nursing - methods
Parent-Child Relations
Patient Education as Topic
Pediatric Nursing - methods
Professional-Family Relations
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - therapy
Abstract
To test the effectiveness of a two-to-three session family therapeutic conversation intervention (FAM-TCI) for primary and partner caregivers of children and adolescents in active cancer treatment on perceived family support and on expressive family functioning.
Quasiexperimental; one group pre- and post-test.
Inpatient cancer unit and a day treatment cancer unit at the Children's Hospital in Reykjavik, Iceland.
19 parent caregivers (10 primary, 9 partner) of children in active cancer medical treatment.
The caregivers completed baseline measure questionnaires and were offered the first sessions of the FAM-TCI. About four to eight weeks later, the second session was administered and then the caregivers were offered a third session, if needed, one week later. When the caregivers had finished all sessions, they answered the same set of questionnaires about one week later.
The FAM-TCI for primary and partner caregivers, family support, and expressive family functioning.
Primary caregivers perceived significantly higher family support after the intervention compared to before. Those caregivers also reported significantly higher expressive family functioning and significantly higher emotional communication after the intervention. Partner caregivers, however, reported significantly lower verbal communication after the FAM-TCI compared to before.
Shortening hospital stays in pediatric oncology populations has focused attention on effective short-term psychosocial interventions. The FAM-TCI is promising as an effective short-term intervention but requires additional testing.
The FAM-TCI strengthened pediatric oncology caregivers in their caregiving activities and was found to benefit primary caregivers regarding their perception of family support and expressive family functioning; therefore, the intervention might benefit future families of children and adolescents in active cancer treatment.
The FAM-TCI was brief, easy to provide, and well fitted. Pediatric oncology nurses can offer brief, beneficial interventions to families of children and adolescents with cancer who are in active treatment. Knowing that primary caregivers experienced support and information may result in more effective evidence-based family care.
PubMed ID
23989027 View in PubMed
Less detail

160 records – page 1 of 16.