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1004 records – page 1 of 101.

229 people, 15,000 body parts: pathologists help solve Swissair 111's grisly puzzles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203179
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Jan 26;160(2):241-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-26-1999
Author
N. Robb
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Jan 26;160(2):241-3
Date
Jan-26-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation
Attitude of Health Personnel
Coroners and Medical Examiners - psychology
DNA Fingerprinting
Family - psychology
Grief
Humans
Nova Scotia
Professional-Family Relations
Abstract
Only 1 of the 229 passengers and crew members killed when Swissair Flight 111 crashed off Nova Scotia in September was visually identifiable. Identifying everyone else on board involved medical and dental detective work of the first order.
PubMed ID
9951448 View in PubMed
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Absorbing information about a child's incurable cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96768
Source
Oncology. 2010;78(3-4):259-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Patrizia Lannen
Joanne Wolfe
Jennifer Mack
Erik Onelov
Ullakarin Nyberg
Ulrika Kreicbergs
Author Affiliation
Phyllis F. Cantor Center, Boston, MA, USA.
Source
Oncology. 2010;78(3-4):259-66
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Death
Bereavement
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality - psychology
Parents
Professional-Family Relations
Questionnaires
Sweden
Terminal Care - methods
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
PURPOSE: To assess parents' ability to absorb information that their child's cancer was incurable and to identify factors associated with parents' ability to absorb this information. PATIENTS AND METHODS: An anonymous mail-in questionnaire study was performed as a population-based investigation in Sweden between August and October of 2001. 449 parents who lost a child to cancer 4-9 years earlier (response rate 80%) completed the survey. 191 (43%) of the bereaved parents were fathers and 251 (56%) were mothers. RESULTS: Sixty percent of parents (n = 258) reported that they were able to absorb the information that their child's illness was incurable. Parents were better able to absorb this information when the information was given in an appropriate manner (RR 1.6; CI 1.3-2.0), when they shared their problems with others during the child's illness course (RR 1.4; CI 1.1-1.8) and when they had no history of depression (RR 1.3; CI 1.0-1.8). Parents who reported that they were able to absorb the information were more likely to have expressed their farewells to the child in their desired manner (RR 1.3; CI 1.0-1.5). CONCLUSIONS: Parents who received information that their child's illness was incurable in an appropriate manner are more likely to absorb that information. Whether or not parents are able to absorb the information that their child's cancer is incurable has implications in terms of preparation for the child's impending death.
PubMed ID
20523086 View in PubMed
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Abusive relationships in families of women with borderline personality disorder, anorexia nervosa and a control group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193394
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2001 Aug;189(8):522-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
L. Laporte
H. Guttman
Author Affiliation
Allan Memorial Institute, Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2001 Aug;189(8):522-31
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Domestic Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Nuclear Family - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Abstract
In a group of intact families, we examined the rates and parameters of verbal, physical, and sexual abuse in 35 women with borderline personality disorder (BPD), 34 women with anorexia nervosa (AN), and 33 women without a clinical history (NC); their experience of multiple abuse and its correlation with their SCL-90-R scores; and their reports of abuse of their siblings. Corroboration of abuse was obtained from some parents in each group. Women with BPD suffered more intrafamilial verbal and physical abuse. Whereas AN and NC women experienced relatively rare single events of extrafamilial sexual abuse at an older age, those with BPD suffered repeated intrafamilial sexual abuse at a younger age and also suffered more multiple abuse. All multiply abused women had more psychopathology. Siblings were reported abused in the same proportions as subjects; many parents of BPDs corroborated their daughters' reports of all three forms of abuse.
PubMed ID
11531204 View in PubMed
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Acceptance, avoidance, and ambiguity: conflicting social values about childhood disability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170909
Source
Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 2005 Dec;15(4):371-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Carol Levine
Author Affiliation
Families and Health Care Project, United Hospital Fund, New York, NY, USA.
Source
Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 2005 Dec;15(4):371-83
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Caregivers - psychology
Child
Chronic Disease - psychology
Data Collection
Dependency (Psychology)
Disabled Children - psychology
Family Relations
Home Nursing - psychology
Humans
Parents - psychology
Quebec
Respiration, Artificial - ethics - psychology
Siblings - psychology
Social Isolation
Social Justice
Social Values
Ventilators, Mechanical
Abstract
Advances in medical technology now permit children who need ventilator assistance to live at home rather than in hospitals or institutions. What does this ventilator-dependent life mean to children and their families? The impetus for this essay comes from a study of the moral experience of 12 Canadian families--parents, ventilator-dependent child, and well siblings. These families express great love for their children, take on enormous responsibilities for care, live with uncertainty, and attempt to create "normal" home environments. Nevertheless, they experience social isolation, sometimes even from their extended families and health care providers. Their lives are constrained in many ways. The challenges faced by parents of technology-dependent children raise questions of justice within society and within families.
PubMed ID
16453960 View in PubMed
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Acting with dedication and expertise: Relatives' experience of nurses' provision of care in a palliative unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276448
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2015 Dec;13(6):1547-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Å. Grøthe
Stian Biong
E K Grov
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2015 Dec;13(6):1547-58
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Death
Family - psychology
Family Relations - psychology
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Neoplasms - complications - psychology
Norway
Nurses - standards
Palliative Care - methods - standards
Qualitative Research
Abstract
Admission of a cancer patient to a palliative unit when near the final stage of their disease trajectory undoubtedly impacts their relatives. The aim of our study was to illuminate and interpret relatives' lived experiences of health personnel's provision of care in a palliative ward.
A phenomenological/hermeneutic approach was employed that was inspired by the philosophical tradition of Heidegger and Ricoeur and further developed by Lindseth and Nordberg. The perspectives of the narrator and the text were interpreted by highlighting relatives' views on a situation in which they have to face existential challenges. The analysis was undertaken in three steps: naïve reading, structural analysis, and comprehensive understanding, including the authors' professional experiences and theoretical background.
Six subthemes appeared: the dying person, the bubble, the sight, the cover, the provision for children's needs, and the availability of immediate help. These components were further constructed into three themes: the meaning of relating, the meaning of action, and the meaning of resources. Our comprehensive understanding of the results suggests that the most important theme is "acting with dedication and expertise."
The following aspects are crucial for relatives of cancer patients hospitalized in a palliative ward: time and existence, family dynamics, and care adjusted to the situation. Our study results led to reflections on the impact of how nurses behave when providing care to patients during the palliative phase, and how they interact with relatives in this situation. We found that cancer patients in a palliative unit most appreciate nurses who act with dedication and expertise.
PubMed ID
24182691 View in PubMed
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Activities of counsellors in a hospice/palliative care environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191781
Source
J Palliat Care. 2001;17(4):229-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
M. Thompson
C. Rose
W. Wainwright
L. Mattar
M. Scanlan
Author Affiliation
Victoria Hospice Society, Royal Jubilee Hospital, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2001;17(4):229-35
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Hospices
Humans
Male
Palliative Care - methods
Professional-Family Relations
Psychotherapy - methods
Social Support
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
This study examined activities related to the provision of psychosocial care by counsellors in the hospice/palliative care setting. A qualitative design using written reports was used in an urban Canadian hospice/palliative care program. A convenient sample of 13 counsellors indicated the activities they typically performed in their work with patients and families. Thematic analysis of the activities directly related to patient and family care was performed and then validated by presenting these activities back to the counsellors in a group setting. Seven themes resulted: 1) companioning; 2) psychosocial assessment, planning, and evaluation; 3) counselling interventions; 4) facilitation and advocacy; 5) patient and family education; 6) consultation and reporting; and 7) team support. These thematic findings confirmed those of previous studies and also highlighted two additional findings. Team support was seen as an activity that directly affected client care, and there was a strong emphasis on the activity of companioning the dying and their families. Also discussed are implications of these results, as well as suggestions for further research.
PubMed ID
11813339 View in PubMed
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Acute disaster exposure and mental health complaints of Norwegian tsunami survivors six months post disaster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91783
Source
Psychiatry. 2008;71(3):266-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Heir Trond
Weisaeth Lars
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Center for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Ullevål University Hospital, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. trond.heir@medisin.uio.no
Source
Psychiatry. 2008;71(3):266-76
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - psychology
Bereavement
Dangerous Behavior
Disasters - statistics & numerical data
Family Relations
Female
Friends
Helping Behavior
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - epidemiology
Survivors - psychology
Abstract
The objective was to investigate the relationship between possible disaster stressors and subsequent health problems among tourists experiencing the 2004 South-East Asia tsunami. A cross-sectional study was performed as a postal survey concerning the experiences of the disaster exposure in retrospect and the presence of psychological symptoms (GHQ-28) in Norwegian tsunami victims 6 months post disaster. The strongest predictors of health complaints were danger of death, witness impressions, and bereavements. Aggravated outcomes were also seen in those who helped others in the acute phase or had sole responsibility for children when the tsunami struck. Having a family member or close friend who was injured was reversely associated with health problems. Women reported more psychological distress than men, but the difference disappeared with increasing degree of danger exposure. Dose-response relationships to psychological distress were found for single exposure factors as well as for the cumulative effects of being exposed to several exposure variables.
PubMed ID
18834277 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and implementation of the nurse-family partnership in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128390
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(7 Suppl 1):eS42-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Susan M Jack
Dianne Busser
Debbie Sheehan
Andrea Gonzalez
Emily J Zwygers
Harriet L Macmillan
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. jacksm@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(7 Suppl 1):eS42-8
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child, Preschool
Feasibility Studies
Female
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Infant
Maternal-Child Nursing - organization & administration
Models, Nursing
Models, organizational
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Professional-Family Relations
Program Evaluation
Public Health Nursing - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Vulnerable Populations
Young Adult
Abstract
International agencies are required to adapt, pilot and then evaluate the effectiveness of the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) prior to broad implementation of this public health intervention. The objectives of this qualitative case study were to: 1) determine whether the NFP can be implemented in Canada with fidelity to the US model, and 2) identify the adaptations required to increase the acceptability of the intervention for service providers and families.
108 low-income, first-time mothers in Hamilton, Ontario, received the NFP intervention. In-depth interviews were conducted with NFP clients (n=38), family members (n=14) and community professionals (n=24).
Hamilton, Ontario.INTERVENTION AND DATA COLLECTION: An intensive nurse home visitation program delivered to women starting early in pregnancy and continuing until the child was two years old. Processes to adapt and implement the NFP were explored across seven focus groups with public health nurses and managers. Eighty documents were reviewed to identify implementation challenges. Data were analyzed using directed content analysis.
The NFP model elements are acceptable to Canadian health care providers, public health nurses and families receiving the intervention. The primary adaptation required was to reduce nurse caseloads from 25 to 20 active clients. Recommendations for adapting and implementing all model elements are described.
The NFP model requires minor adaptations to increase the acceptability of the intervention to Canadian stakeholders. A consistent approach to adapting the NFP program in Canada is necessary as provincial jurisdictions commit themselves to supporting an experimental evaluation of the effectiveness of the NFP.
PubMed ID
23618049 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and resiliency in Swedish families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84584
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Sep;21(3):329-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Kiehl Ermalynn M
Carson David K
Dykes Anna-Karin
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA. e.kiehl@louisville.edu
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Sep;21(3):329-37
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Family Health
Family Relations
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Middle Aged
Mothers - psychology
Nuclear Family - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
A longitudinal research project began in 1993 of Norwegian, Swedish and American mothers' perception of her family's dynamics and adaptation during childbearing and childrearing. Results indicated that Swedish mothers adapted better than other mothers. In 2003, a mixed design study was conducted with original Swedish mothers that aimed to describe the experience of motherhood, the meaning mothers attached to events in their lives that made adaptation necessary, and ways in which they achieved adaptation. Fourteen mothers completed quantitative instruments and 13 of those mothers were interviewed. Audiotaped interviews were transcribed and analysed for themes using a protocol based on a model of family resiliency. Quantitative findings revealed statistically significant findings in areas of children, mother's work outside the home and families in which a major illness had occurred. Qualitative findings revealed that protective factors far outweighed vulnerability and risk factors. Mothers' satisfaction with life manifested itself in love of home, contentment with employment, fulfillment from an active and healthy life and support from a society that provides a wide range of social benefits for the family. Vulnerability occurred primarily when mothers were tired, lacked personal time or someone in the family was experiencing a serious illness. Results of this study enhance the scholarly scientific knowledge about the uniqueness of Swedish mothers, and increased understanding of family dynamics and adaptation. Many of the findings relate in some way to overall social benefits and supports available for families.
PubMed ID
17727545 View in PubMed
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Addressing spouses' unique needs after cardiac surgery when recovery is complicated by heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149887
Source
Heart Lung. 2009 Jul-Aug;38(4):284-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
Susanna Agren
Gunilla Hollman Frisman
Sören Berg
Rolf Svedjeholm
Anna Strömberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Linköping University Hospital and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping S-58185, Sweden. susanna.agren@liu.se
Source
Heart Lung. 2009 Jul-Aug;38(4):284-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - rehabilitation
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - rehabilitation
Empathy
Female
Heart Failure - etiology - nursing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Professional-Family Relations
Social Support
Spouses - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Cardiac surgery places extensive stress on spouses who often are more worried than the patients themselves. Spouses can experience difficult and demanding situations when the partner becomes critically ill.
To identify, describe, and conceptualize the individual needs of spouses of patients with complications of heart failure after cardiac surgery.
Grounded theory using a mix of systematic coding, data analysis, and theoretical sampling was performed. Spouses, 10 women and 3 men between 39 and 85 years, were interviewed.
During analysis, the core category of confirmation was identified as describing the individual needs of the spouses. The core category theoretically binds together three underlying subcategories: security, rest for mind and body, and inner strength. Confirmation facilitated acceptance and improvement of mental and physical health among spouses.
By identifying spouses' needs for security, rest for mind and body, and inner strength, health care professionals can confirm these needs throughout the caring process, from the critical care period and throughout rehabilitation at home. Interventions to confirm spouses' needs are important because they are vital to the patients' recovery.
PubMed ID
19577699 View in PubMed
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1004 records – page 1 of 101.