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Source
Can Fam Physician. 1997 Jun;43:1047-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
D J Weinkauf
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1997 Jun;43:1047-8
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Family Practice - manpower
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Medically underserved area
Ontario
Primary Health Care - manpower
Notes
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1997 Apr;43:677-83, 7339111984
Comment On: Can Fam Physician. 1997 Apr;43:677-83, 7339111984
PubMed ID
9189287 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Fam Physician. 1999 Mar;45:553-5, 562-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
C. Levitt
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1999 Mar;45:553-5, 562-4
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Curriculum
Family Practice - manpower - trends
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Obstetrics - manpower - trends
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
Notes
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1998 Mar;44:568-729559197
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1998 Oct;44:2117-249805166
Cites: CMAJ. 1988 Oct 15;139(8):737-403167734
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1997 Feb;43:239-469040911
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1997 Sep;43:1541-79303233
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1998 Mar;44:558-679559196
PubMed ID
10099790 View in PubMed
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[Advanced prehospital care in patients with life-threatening conditions--survival rate, health status and functional level]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70488
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Nov 21;167(47):4465-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-21-2005
Author
Anette Marianne Fedder
Niels Kim Schønemann
Alf Jørgen Møl Christensen
Erika Frischknecht Christensen
Author Affiliation
Arhus Universitetshospital, Arhus Sygehus, Anaestesiologisk og Intensiv Afdeling. a.fedder@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Nov 21;167(47):4465-8
Date
Nov-21-2005
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Ambulances - manpower - organization & administration
Anesthesiology - manpower
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Denmark
Emergency medical services
English Abstract
Family Practice - manpower - organization & administration
Female
Health status
Humans
Life Support Care - manpower - organization & administration
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Recovery of Function
Registries
Resuscitation
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: In Aarhus, Denmark, advanced prehospital care was carried out by anaesthetists working in a rendezvous model with ordinary ambulances. The effect on the patient was evaluated by the physician on scene. The purpose of the study was to evaluate survival rate, health status and functional level in patients after lifesaving prehospital care. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Consecutive data were reported to a prehospital database and the National Patient Registry. Data on survival from 1998 to 2000 were retrieved. Functional level was studied in lifesaving cases in the year 2000. We interviewed the general practitioners (GPs) involved according to EuroQol. The EuroQol interview concerned health status and function level. RESULTS: In 1998-2000, prehospital anaesthetists attended a total of 11,684 patients. Treatment was described as lifesaving in 238 (2%) of the cases, and 63% of the patients (151/238) were alive one year later. In the year 2000, 79 patients were identified as having had lifesaving treatment, and 48 were alive one year later; 67% (32/48) were without functional impairment according to EuroQol. The most frequent diagnoses were self-intoxication and cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. CONCLUSION: Lifesaving prehospital care, as evaluated by the prehospital physician on scene, was performed in 2 percent of all cases attended by a prehospital anaesthetist. Of these patients, the majority were alive after one year and without functional impairment, according to their GP. The diagnoses were varied.
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Jan 16;168(3):297-8; author reply 29816430828
PubMed ID
16305767 View in PubMed
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Assessment of international medical graduates and their integration into family practice: the Clinician Assessment for Practice Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158493
Source
Acad Med. 2008 Mar;83(3):309-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Robert F Maudsley
Author Affiliation
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Nova Scotia, Suite 200, 1559 Brunswick St., Halifax, NS B3J 2G1,Canada. rmaudsley@cpsns.ns.ca
Source
Acad Med. 2008 Mar;83(3):309-15
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Certification - standards
Educational Measurement
Educational Status
Family Practice - manpower
Foreign Medical Graduates - standards
Humans
Licensure, Medical - standards
Mentors
Nova Scotia
Physicians, Family - standards
Program Development
Questionnaires
Abstract
The Clinician Assessment for Practice Program (CAPP), a program of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Nova Scotia (CPSNS), assesses the readiness for family practice of international medical graduates (IMGs) who have trained and practiced abroad with no formal Canadian residency training.CAPP has three parts. Part A, a therapeutics exam and an objective structured clinical examination, assesses practice readiness. Part B is a 12-month mentorship in which the CAPP physician is in active practice under a defined license and is mentored by an established family physician. The mentor provides teaching, supervision, guidance, and regular performance assessment. Each CAPP physician negotiates an individualized continuing medical education plan. An on-site assessment of each CAPP physician's practice is conducted by an external assessor who provides feedback to the CAPP physician and his or her mentor. Multisource feedback is administered at 10 months, using questionnaires from patients and colleagues. After 12 months, all assessment data are reviewed by the CPSNS to determine whether to continue the defined license. Part C, run by the registration department (not CAPP), may last three additional years until full licensure is obtained. To date, 148 IMGs have been assessed, 35 have been deemed eligible for a defined license, and 27 have entered family practice, virtually all in small or medium-sized communities in Nova Scotia. The program has been well received by participants and their communities. The mentorship, particularly valuable in assisting IMGs to integrate into their communities, has proven to be the defining feature of CAPP.
PubMed ID
18316885 View in PubMed
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[Association between productivity, list size, patient and practice characteristics in general practice]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97195
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 Apr 19;172(16):1192-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-19-2010
Author
Kim Rose Olsen
Torben Højmark Sørensen
Dorte Gyrd-Hansen
Author Affiliation
Dansk Sundhedsinstitut, Forskningsenheden for Sundhedsøkonomi, Institut for Sundhedstjenesteforskning, Syddansk Universitet, Dampfaergevej 27-29, DK-2100 København Ø, Denmark. kro@dsi.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 Apr 19;172(16):1192-6
Date
Apr-19-2010
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Denmark
Efficiency, Organizational
Family Practice - manpower - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Group Practice
Humans
Patients - classification - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns
Private Practice
Registries
Socioeconomic Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Due to shortage of general practitioners, it may be necessary to improve productivity. We assess the association between productivity, list size and patient- and practice characteristics. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A regression approach is used to perform productivity analysis based on national register data and survey data for 1,758 practices. Practices are divided into four groups according to list size and productivity. Statistical tests are used to assess differences in patient- and practice characteristics. RESULTS: There is a significant, positive correlation between list size and productivity (p
PubMed ID
20423660 View in PubMed
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[A study of 20 general practitioners' role in the care of patients with cancer in Uppsala. Detailed specialist information facilitates the determination of support needs]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19249
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Feb 21;99(8):771-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-21-2002
Author
Birgitta Johansson
Gunilla Berglund
Katarina Hoffman
Bengt Glimelius
Per-Olow Sjödén
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet. birgitta.johansson@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Feb 21;99(8):771-3
Date
Feb-21-2002
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
English Abstract
Family Practice - manpower
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Medical Records
Neoplasms - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Oncology Service, Hospital - manpower
Physician's Role
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians, Family
Questionnaires
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study is to describe the role of the GP in the care of one specified cancer patient per GP and to explore the GP's knowledge about that patient's disease and treatments. A further aim was to evaluate the effects of an extended information routine, including increased information from the specialist clinic to the GP. Twenty GPs were selected for a semi-structured interview about a patient randomised either to an extended GP information routine or to standard information. The results suggest that GPs are commonly involved in the care of cancer patients, particularly in the diagnosis of the disease but also during the period of treatments and follow-up. The information from the specialist clinic to the GP is insufficient in standard care. The extended information routine increased the GPs' knowledge about the disease and treatments and facilitated their possibilities to determine patients' need for support. However, this did not affect the extent of contacts with the patient.
PubMed ID
11894615 View in PubMed
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Attrition from general practice: career patterns of Toronto medical school graduates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249875
Source
J Med Educ. 1977 Jun;52(6):494-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1977
Author
M A Fruen
M. Chipman
J W Steiner
Source
J Med Educ. 1977 Jun;52(6):494-9
Date
Jun-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Career Choice
Family Practice - manpower
Humans
Internship and Residency
Longitudinal Studies
Ontario
Schools, Medical
Time Factors
Abstract
Reported here are the results of a study of the degree to which medical careers in general practice versus specialization are pursued by graduates of the University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine in the first six years after the completion of their internships. The retention rates in general practice and residency are documented on an annual basis using the life table method. The annual rate of attrition from general practice dropped substantially after the first three years. Fifteen percent of the initial general practice group dropped out during the first year, 10 percent of the remainder in the second year, and 8 percent of the rest in the third year. In each of the subsequent three years, the attrition rate was 4 percent, 4 percent, and 2 percent, respectively.
PubMed ID
864666 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 May;54(5):722-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Phyllis Marie Jensen
Karen Trollope-Kumar
Heather Waters
Jennifer Everson
Author Affiliation
McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 May;54(5):722-9
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Burnout, Professional - prevention & control
Family Practice - manpower - organization & administration
Female
Group Practice - organization & administration
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Ontario
Physicians, Family - psychology
Social Support
Stress, Physiological - prevention & control
Abstract
To explore the dimensions of family physician resilience.
Qualitative study using in-depth interviews with family physician peers.
Hamilton, Ont.
Purposive sample of 17 family physicians.
An iterative process of face-to-face, in-depth interviews that were audiotaped and transcribed. The research team independently reviewed each interview for emergent themes with consensus reached through discussion and comparison. Themes were grouped into conceptual categories.
Four main aspects of physician resilience were identified: 1) attitudes and perspectives, which include valuing the physician role, maintaining interest, developing self-awareness, and accepting personal limitations; 2) balance and prioritization, which include setting limits, taking effective approaches to continuing professional development, and honouring the self;3) practice management style, which includes sound business management, having good staff, and using effective practice arrangements; and 4) supportive relations, which include positive personal relationships, effective professional relationships, and good communication.
Resilience is a dynamic, evolving process of positive attitudes and effective strategies.
Notes
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Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 2008 Oct;54(10):1399-40018854466
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 2008 May;54(5):665, 66718474687
PubMed ID
18474706 View in PubMed
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Canadian dispatches from medical fronts: Fort McMurray.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162697
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Jul 3;177(1):26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-3-2007

Career choice of new medical students at three Canadian universities: family medicine versus specialty medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179534
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Jun 22;170(13):1920-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-22-2004
Author
Bruce Wright
Ian Scott
Wayne Woloschuk
Fraser Brenneis
Joelle Bradley
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta. wrightb@ucalgary.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Jun 22;170(13):1920-4
Date
Jun-22-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
British Columbia
Career Choice
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Family Practice - manpower
Female
Health Manpower
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Questionnaires
Specialization
Students, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Over the last 10 years the number of medical students choosing family medicine as a career has steadily declined. Studies have demonstrated that career preference at the time that students begin medical school may be significantly associated with their ultimate career choice. We sought to identify the career preferences students have at entry to medical school and the factors related to family medicine as a first-choice career option.
A questionnaire was administered to students entering medical school programs at the time of entry at the University of Calgary (programs beginning in 2001 and 2002), University of British Columbia (2001 and 2002) and University of Alberta (2002). Students were asked to indicate their top 3 career choices and to rank the importance of 25 variables with respect to their career choice. Factor analysis was performed on the variables. Reliability of the factor scores was estimated using Cronbach's alpha coefficients; biserial correlations between the factors and career choice were also calculated. A logistic regression was performed using career choice (family v. other) as the criterion variable and the factors plus demographic characteristics as predictor variables.
Of 583 students, 519 (89%) completed the questionnaire. Only 20% of the respondents identified family medicine as their first career option, and about half ranked family medicine in their top 3 choices. Factor analysis produced 5 factors (medical lifestyle, societal orientation, prestige, hospital orientation and varied scope of practice) that explained 52% of the variance in responses. The 5 factors demonstrated acceptable internal consistency and correlated in the expected direction with the choice of family medicine. Logistic regression revealed that students who identified family medicine as their first choice tended to be older, to be concerned about medical lifestyle and to have lived in smaller communities at the time of completing high school; they were also less likely to be hospital oriented. Moreover, students who chose family medicine were much more likely to demonstrate a societal orientation and to desire a varied scope of practice.
Several factors appear to drive students toward family medicine, most notably having a societal orientation and a desire for a varied scope of practice. If the factors that influence medical students to choose family medicine can be identified accurately, then it may be possible to use such a model to change medical school admission policies so that the number of students choosing to enter family medicine can be increased.
Notes
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Erratum In: CMAJ. 2004 Nov 23;171(11):1327
Erratum In: CMAJ. 2004 Aug 3;171(3):222
PubMed ID
15210640 View in PubMed
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105 records – page 1 of 11.