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Canadian Quality Circle pilot project in osteoporosis: rationale, methods, and feasibility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160847
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Oct;53(10):1694-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
George Ioannidis
Alexandra Papaioannou
Lehana Thabane
Amiram Gafni
Anthony Hodsman
Brent Kvern
Dan Johnstone
Nathalie Plumley
Alanna Baldwin
M. Doupe
Alan Katz
Lena Salach
Jonathan D Adachi
Author Affiliation
McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont. g.ioannidis@sympatico.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Oct;53(10):1694-700
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Family Practice - education - methods - standards
Feasibility Studies
Female
Guideline Adherence - organization & administration
Humans
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - diagnosis - therapy
Pilot Projects
Program Evaluation
Quality Assurance, Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
PROBLEM ADDRESSED Family physicians are not adequately following the 2002 Osteoporosis Canada guidelines for providing optimal care to patients with osteoporosis.
The Canadian Quality Circle (CQC) pilot project was developed to assess the feasibility of the CQC project design and to gather information for implementing a national study of quality circles (QCs). The national study would assess whether use ofQCs could improve family physicians' adherence to the osteoporosis guidelines.
The pilot project enrolled 52 family physicians and involved 7 QCs. The project had 3 phases: training and baseline data collection, educational intervention and follow-up data collection, and sessions on implementing strategies for care.
Findings from the pilot study showed that the CQC project was well designed and well received. Use of QCs appeared to be feasible for transferring knowledge and giving physicians an opportunity to analyze work-related problems and develop solutions to them.
Notes
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Erratum In: Can Fam Physician. 2007 Dec;53(12):2105
PubMed ID
17934033 View in PubMed
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The diagnostic accuracy of Danish GPs in the diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20658
Source
Fam Pract. 1999 Dec;16(6):619-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
G B Jemec
Author Affiliation
Dept of Medicine, Roskilde Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Fam Pract. 1999 Dec;16(6):619-20
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence - statistics & numerical data
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Denmark
Education, Medical, Graduate
Family Practice - education - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Middle Aged
Nevus, Pigmented - diagnosis
Predictive value of tests
Sensitivity and specificity
Skin Neoplasms - diagnosis
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The GP often has a primary function in assessing pigmented skin lesions in Denmark. No data are available on the diagnostic accuracy of this process. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to study the sensitivity, specificity and positive prognostic value of the diagnosis made by 27 trained or trainee GPs. METHOD: We tested the diagnostic accuracy of the viewing of colour slides of pigmented skin lesions under standardized conditions at a seminar on skin cancer. Diagnostic accuracy was determined only for the clinically relevant diagnosis of benign or malignant. RESULTS: The median diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity) for the group as a whole was 0.75 (95% CI 0.65-0.80), the specificity was 0.70 (95% CI 0.68-0.79) and the positive predictive value 0.70 (95% CI 0.62-0.77). CONCLUSION: These values are comparable with previously published figures for trainee dermatologists, and it is therefore concluded that ongoing interest rather than basic training is the major determinant for clinical acumen.
PubMed ID
10625140 View in PubMed
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The uncertain consultation and patient satisfaction: the impact of patients' illness perceptions and a randomized controlled trial on the training of physicians' communication skills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70486
Source
Psychosom Med. 2005 Nov-Dec;67(6):897-905
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lisbeth Frostholm
Per Fink
Eva Oernboel
Kaj S Christensen
Tomas Toft
Frede Olesen
John Weinman
Author Affiliation
Research Clinic for Functional Disorders and Psychosomatics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus N, Denmark.
Source
Psychosom Med. 2005 Nov-Dec;67(6):897-905
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Communication
Comparative Study
Family Practice - education - methods - standards
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services Research
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Patient satisfaction
Personality Inventory
Physicians - psychology - standards
Prognosis
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - standards
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Teaching
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To identify predictors of patient satisfaction among a range of patient and practitioner variables. In particular, to focus on patients' illness perceptions and the impact of a randomized controlled trial on the training of physicians in general communication skills and how to treat patients presenting with poorly defined illness. METHODS: A randomized controlled follow-up study conducted in 28 general practices in Aarhus County, Denmark. Half of the physicians were randomized into an educational program on treatment of patients presenting with medically unexplained symptoms (somatization). One thousand seven hundred eighty-five general practice attenders presenting a new health problem completed questionnaires on illness perceptions, physical functioning, and mental distress before the consultation. After the consultation, a questionnaire including relational and communicative domains of patient satisfaction with the current consultation was completed. The physicians completed a questionnaire for each patient on diagnostics and prognostics. Predictors of patient satisfaction were determined by logistic regression. RESULTS: A large number of patient and practitioner variables predicted satisfaction in univariate logistic regression models. Results from a multivariate logistic model showed that the illness perceptions "uncertainty" (patient not knowing what is wrong) and "emotional representations" (the complaint making the patient feel worried, depressed, helpless, afraid, hopeless) predicted dissatisfaction at OR (CI) = 1.8 (1.3-2.4), p
PubMed ID
16314594 View in PubMed
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