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The ability of general practitioners to detect mental disorders in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216423
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):52-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
M. Joukamaa
V. Lehtinen
H. Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):52-6
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Graduate
Family Practice - education
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Patient care team
Primary Health Care
Psychiatry - education
Psychophysiologic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Sampling Studies
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Abstract
The ability to detect mental disorders varies greatly among general practitioners in primary health care. The aim of this study was to determine the factors underlying the differences between general practitioners in the ability to recognize mental disorders in Finnish patient populations. The group studied consisted of 1000 randomly selected adult patients of primary care facilities in the city of Turku. The Symptom Checklist (SCL-25) was used as the reference method in the identification of psychiatric cases. According to the SCL-25, one fourth of the sample had mental disorders. A good recognition ability was associated with postgraduate psychiatric training and qualification as a specialist in general practice. Surprisingly, Balint group training, which is a method intended to improve the ability of general practitioners to manage their patients' mental health problems, was associated rather with poor than good detection ability.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Oct;92(4):3198848961
PubMed ID
7754788 View in PubMed
Less detail

Academic family physicians' perception of genetic testing and integration into practice: a CERA study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115009
Source
Fam Med. 2013 Apr;45(4):257-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Arch G Mainous
Sharleen P Johnson
Svetlana Chirina
Richard Baker
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA. mainouag@musc.edu
Source
Fam Med. 2013 Apr;45(4):257-62
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Faculty, Medical
Family Practice - education - methods
Female
Genetic Testing - methods
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Middle Aged
Self Report
United States
Abstract
Genetic testing for a variety of diseases is becoming more available to primary care physicians, but it is unclear how useful physicians perceive these tests to be. We examined academic family physicians' perception of and experiences with clinical genetic testing and direct-to-consumer genetic testing.
This study is an analysis of a survey conducted as part of the Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA). Academic family physicians in the United States and Canada were queried about their perception of genetic testing's utility, how frequently patients ask about genetic testing, and the importance of genetic testing in future practice and education of students and residents.
The overall survey had a response rate of 45.1% (1,404/3,112). A majority (54.4%) of respondents felt that they were not knowledgeable about available genetic tests. Respondents perceived greater utility of genetic tests for breast cancer (94.9%) and hemochromatosis (74.9%) than for Alzheimer's disease (30.3%), heart disease (25.4%), or diabetes (25.2%). Individuals with greater self-perceived knowledge of genetic tests were more likely to feel that genetic testing would have a significant impact on their future practice (23.1%) than those with less knowledge (13.4%). Respondents had little exposure to direct-to-consumer genetic tests, but a majority felt that they were more likely to cause harm than benefit.
Academic family physicians acknowledge their lack of knowledge about genetic tests. Educational initiatives may be useful in helping them incorporate genetic testing into practice and in teaching these skills to medical students and residents.
PubMed ID
23553089 View in PubMed
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Access to palliative medicine training for Canadian family medicine residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205465
Source
Palliat Med. 1998 Jan;12(1):23-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
D. Oneschuk
E. Bruera
Author Affiliation
Edmonton Regional Palliative Care Program, University of Alberta, Canada.
Source
Palliat Med. 1998 Jan;12(1):23-7
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Medical, Graduate
Family Practice - education
Humans
Palliative Care
Schools, Medical
Teaching - methods
Abstract
The authors conducted a nine-item mail questionnaire of the 16 Canadian family medicine teaching programme directors to determine the accessibility and operation of palliative care education for their respective family medicine residents. All 16 faculties of medicine responded (100%). The survey revealed that while all universities offer elective time in palliative care only five out of 16 (31%) have a mandatory rotation. The median durations of the mandatory and elective rotations are limited to two and three-and-a-half weeks, respectively. The majority of the universities offer formal lectures in palliative care (12/16, 75%) and educational reading material (13/16, 81%), with the main format in 14/16 (87%) of the sites being case-based learning. The two most common sites for teaching to occur for the residents are the community/outpatient environment and an acute palliative care unit. Fifty-six per cent (9/16) of the universities have designated faculty positions for palliative medicine with a median number of two positions per site. Only one centre offers a specific palliative medicine examination during the rotation. Feedback from the residents regarding their respective palliative medicine programmes were positive overall. Findings from our survey indicate an ongoing need for improved education in palliative medicine at the postgraduate level.
PubMed ID
9616456 View in PubMed
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[A cognitive approach to overutilization of health services].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192488
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 24;98(43):4745-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-24-2001

Actionable nuggets: knowledge translation tool for the needs of patients with spinal cord injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269783
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2015 May;61(5):e240-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Mary Ann McColl
Alice Aiken
Karen Smith
Alexander McColl
Michael Green
Marshall Godwin
Richard Birtwhistle
Kathleen Norman
Gabrielle Brankston
Michael Schaub
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2015 May;61(5):e240-8
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia
Family Practice - education
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Newfoundland and Labrador
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Primary Health Care
Spinal Cord Injuries
Translational Medical Research - methods
Abstract
To present the results of a pilot study of an innovative methodology for translating best evidence about spinal cord injury (SCI) for family practice.
Review of Canadian and international peer-reviewed literature to develop SCI Actionable Nuggets, and a mixed qualitative-quantitative evaluation to determine Nuggets' effect on physician knowledge of and attitudes toward patients with SCI, as well as practice accessibility.
Ontario, Newfoundland, and Australia.
Forty-nine primary care physicians.
Twenty Actionable Nuggets (pertaining to key health issues associated with long-term SCI) were developed. Nugget postcards were mailed weekly for 20 weeks to participating physicians. Prior knowledge of SCI was self-rated by participants; they also completed an online posttest to assess the information they gained from the Nugget postcards. Participants' opinions about practice accessibility and accommodations for patients with SCI, as well as the acceptability and usefulness of Nuggets, were assessed in interviews.
With Actionable Nuggets, participants' knowledge of the health needs of patients with SCI improved, as knowledge increased from a self-rating of fair (58%) to very good (75%) based on posttest quiz results. The mean overall score for accessibility and accommodations in physicians' practices was 72%. Participants' awareness of the need for screening and disease prevention among this population also increased. The usefulness and acceptability of SCI Nugget postcards were rated as excellent.
Actionable Nuggets are a knowledge translation tool designed to provide family physicians with concise, practical information about the most prevalent and pressing primary care needs of patients with SCI. This evidence-based resource has been shown to be an excellent fit with information consumption processes in primary care. They were updated and adapted for distribution by the Canadian Medical Association to approximately 50,000 primary care physicians in Canada, in both English and French.
Notes
Cites: BMJ. 2003 Oct 18;327(7420):882-314563720
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2003 Sep 22;163(17):2085-9214504123
Cites: Can J Neurol Sci. 2003 May;30(2):113-2112774950
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 2002 Oct;14(5):369-8112389803
Cites: MedGenMed. 2001 Apr 6;3(2):1811549967
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2001 Mar;52(5):657-7011218171
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2000 Jun;90(6):955-6110846515
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2000 Mar 20;22(5):211-2410813560
Cites: Aust Fam Physician. 2008 May;37(5):331-2, 335-818464962
Cites: Spinal Cord. 2008 Jun;46(6):406-1118071356
Cites: Spinal Cord. 2010 Jan;48(1):39-4419546873
Cites: Spinal Cord. 2010 Jan;48(1):45-5019546877
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2012 Nov;58(11):1207-16, e626-3523152456
Cites: Spinal Cord. 2007 Jan;45(1):25-3616733520
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2006 Apr 1;31(7):799-80516582854
Cites: Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 1997 May-Jun;76(3 Suppl):S2-89210859
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1988 Oct;27(4):365-7, 370-13171488
Cites: Am Fam Physician. 1981 Jul;24(1):105-117271919
Cites: Rehabil Nurs. 2000 Jan-Feb;25(1):6-910754921
Cites: Aust Fam Physician. 2008 Apr;37(4):229-3318398518
PubMed ID
26167564 View in PubMed
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Additional skills training for rural physicians. Alberta's rural physician action plan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169033
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 May;52:601-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Ron Gorsche
John Hnatuik
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary. john.hnatuik@rpap.ab.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 May;52:601-4
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Education, Medical, Continuing - organization & administration
Family Practice - education - manpower
Humans
Medically underserved area
Personnel Selection
Preceptorship - organization & administration
Rural Health Services - manpower
Abstract
Rural physicians in Alberta identified access to special skills training and upgrading skills as an important practice requirement.
The Rural Physician Action Plan in Alberta developed an Enrichment Program to assist physicians practising in rural Alberta communities to upgrade their existing skills or gain new skills. The Enrichment Program aimed to provide a single point of entry to skills training that was individualized and based on the needs of rural physicians.
Two experienced rural physicians were engaged as "skills brokers" to help rural physicians requesting additional skills training or upgrading to find the training they required. Physicians interested in applying for the Enrichment Program consulted one of the brokers. Each applicant was assigned a preceptor. Preceptors confirmed learning objectives with trainees, provided the required training in keeping with agreed-upon learning objectives, and ensured trainees were evaluated at the end of the training.
The program has helped rural physicians upgrade their skills and gain new skills. More Alberta rural physicians are now able to pursue additional training and return to practise new skills in their rural and remote communities than in the past.
Notes
Cites: J Rural Health. 1994 Summer;10(3):183-9210138034
Cites: CMAJ. 1998 Feb 10;158(3):351-59484262
PubMed ID
16739833 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2000 Aug;46:1641-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
S. Johnstone
L. Jugloff
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2000 Aug;46:1641-4
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent Medicine - education
Family Practice - education
Humans
Internship and Residency
Manitoba
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Physician-Patient Relations
Pilot Projects
PubMed ID
10955184 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Advanced Trauma Life Support Program in Manitoba: a 5-year review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221346
Source
Can J Surg. 1993 Apr;36(2):181-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
J. Ali
M. Howard
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg.
Source
Can J Surg. 1993 Apr;36(2):181-3
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Medical, Continuing
Emergency Service, Hospital
Family Practice - education
General Surgery - education
Hospitals, Rural
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Life Support Care
Manitoba
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Time Factors
Abstract
Twenty Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) courses were conducted at the University of Manitoba between 1982 and 1987. There were 302 registrants, 95 of whom were from rural communities. Twelve registrants failed the course. The impact of the program was assessed by questionnaire (68.8% response overall). The response from department heads of surgery in urban hospitals was 87.5% and from surgeons in rural areas 50%. Fifty-eight percent of rural surgeons, 62.5% of urban surgeons and 75% of urban emergency-department directors claimed they could identify those who had attended an ATLS course by the increased confidence demonstrated and the use of more timely and appropriate consultation and treatment. Thirty percent of rural surgeons, 37% of urban surgeons and 42% of emergency-department directors claimed that mortality and morbidity were decreased when care was provided by ATLS-trained physicians. The remainder were undecided because of lack of information. Ninety-three percent of respondents indicated that the course increased their confidence, trauma capability and ability to communicate with consultant trauma surgeons. Fifty-two percent thought the course should be mandatory for all physicians, and 100% thought it should be mandatory for all emergency-department physicians. The data suggest that although most physicians treat fewer trauma patients 5 years after their ATLS training, the course is still highly recommended, and it has improved trauma care. Although the ATLS program was intended primarily for rural physicians, more urban-based physicians registered for it.
PubMed ID
8472232 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Mar;53(3):501-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Courtney Howard
Author Affiliation
Victoria Site of the University of British Columbia's Family Practice.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Mar;53(3):501-2
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Afghanistan
British Columbia
Emigration and Immigration
Family Practice - education
Humans
Internship and Residency
Physician-Patient Relations
PubMed ID
17872689 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2011 Jul;57(7):754-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Nicholas Pimlott
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2011 Jul;57(7):754-5
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Family Practice - education
Geriatrics - education
Humans
Internship and Residency
United States
Notes
Cites: Fam Med. 2008 Nov-Dec;40(10):707-1418979258
Cites: Fam Med. 2008 Nov-Dec;40(10):741-318979263
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2011 Jul;57(7):771-621753098
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2011 Jul;57(7):e263-921753085
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2011 Jul;57(7):765-7021753097
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2011 Jul;57(7):e253-6221753084
PubMed ID
21753088 View in PubMed
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454 records – page 1 of 46.