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The 15-Minute Family Interview as a learning strategy for senior undergraduate nursing students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117158
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2013 May;19(2):230-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Lorraine Holtslander
Jessica Solar
Nicole R Smith
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada. lorraine.holtslander@usask.ca
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2013 May;19(2):230-48
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communication
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - methods
Family Nursing - education - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Models, Nursing
Students, Nursing
Abstract
Nursing care of families continues to be a challenge within complex and demanding health-care systems. Educational strategies to bridge the theory-practice gap, connecting classroom learning with clinical experiences in undergraduate nursing education, enable students to develop the skills required to form meaningful partnerships with families. This article describes how undergraduate nursing students complete a 15-Minute Family Interview in a clinical practice setting, and document the interview process in a reflective major paper. Students integrate research and theory and identify ways to improve the care of families in the clinical setting while building communication skills and confidence in interacting with families in everyday practice. The implementation of the assignment and the evaluation of the process, including quotes from 10 student papers and 2 clinical faculty members, are discussed. Implications for education and ongoing research are offered.
PubMed ID
23329627 View in PubMed
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'Being appropriately unusual': a challenge for nurses in health-promoting conversations with families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85893
Source
Nurs Inq. 2008 Jun;15(2):106-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Benzein Eva Gunilla
Hagberg Margaretha
Saveman Britt-Inger
Author Affiliation
School of Human Sciences, Kalmar University, Kalmar, Sweden. eva.benzein@hik.se
Source
Nurs Inq. 2008 Jun;15(2):106-15
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication
Cooperative Behavior
Family - psychology
Family Health
Family Nursing - organization & administration
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Models, Nursing
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Theory
Organizational Innovation
Patient Participation - methods - psychology
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Philosophy, Nursing
Professional-Family Relations
Social Change
Sweden
Abstract
This study describes the theoretical assumptions and the application for health-promoting conversations, as a communication tool for nurses when talking to patients and their families. The conversations can be used on a promotional, preventive and healing level when working with family-focused nursing. They are based on a multiverse, salutogenetic, relational and reflecting approach, and acknowledge each person's experience as equally valid, and focus on families' resources, and the relationship between the family and its environment. By posing reflective questions, reflection is made possible for both the family and the nurses. Family members are invited to tell their story, and they can listen to and learn from each other. Nurses are challenged to build a co-creating partnership with families in order to acknowledge them as experts on how to lead their lives and to use their own expert knowledge in order to facilitate new meanings to surface. In this way, family health can be enhanced.
PubMed ID
18476853 View in PubMed
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Child in hospital: family experiences and expectations of how nurses can promote family health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176477
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2005 Feb;14(2):212-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Hanna Hopia
Patricia S Tomlinson
Eija Paavilainen
Päivi Astedt-Kurki
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. hanna.hopia@jypoly.fi
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2005 Feb;14(2):212-22
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Anxiety - prevention & control - psychology
Attitude to Health
Child
Child, Hospitalized - psychology
Chronic Disease - nursing - psychology
Cost of Illness
Family - psychology
Family Health
Family Nursing - methods
Finland
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Middle Aged
Models, Nursing
Models, Psychological
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Professional-Family Relations
Questionnaires
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
This study set out to explore, from the family's point of view, ways in which nursing staff can promote family health during the child's hospital stay.
Having a child in hospital is a major source of stress and anxiety for the whole family. Earlier studies have described parental coping strategies, ways to strengthen those strategies and to support parental participation in child care, but no one has studied the promotion of family health during the child's hospitalization from the family's point of view.
Interviews were conducted in 2002 with 29 families who had a child with a chronic illness which were receiving or had received treatment on the paediatric wards of two Finnish hospitals.
Data analysis was based on the grounded theory method, proceeding to the stage of axial coding. Data collection and analysis phases proceeded simultaneously.
Five domains were distinguished in the promotion of family health: (1) reinforcing parenthood, (2) looking after the child's welfare, (3) sharing the emotional burden, (4) supporting everyday coping and (5) creating a confidential care relationship.
The results strengthen the knowledge base of family nursing by showing how nursing staff can promote family health during the child's hospital stay.
The results have a number of practical applications for nursing, both for clinical practice and research. The results can be used in paediatric hospital wards caring for chronically ill children and their families. The five domains of family health promotion described here should be tested in other paediatric wards and in other geographical locations.
Notes
Comment In: J Clin Nurs. 2005 May;14(5):650-115840081
Comment In: J Clin Nurs. 2006 Jan;15(1):111-316390531
PubMed ID
15669930 View in PubMed
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A Christmas without memories: Beliefs about grief and mothering--a clinical case analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166584
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2006 Nov;12(4):426-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Nancy J Moules
Lorraine M Thirsk
Janice M Bell
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary.
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2006 Nov;12(4):426-41
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Alberta
Attitude to Death
Communication
Family Nursing - organization & administration
Female
Grief
Holidays
Humans
Models, Psychological
Mother-Child Relations
Nuclear Family - psychology
Nurse Clinicians - organization & administration - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Patient Education as Topic
Psychotherapy
Abstract
In clinical work using the Illness Beliefs Model, therapeutic leverage is focused on challenging constraining beliefs of family members that are contributing to their suffering. This challenge occurs in many ways, including offering alternative facilitating beliefs that may lead to healing rather than suffering. This article describes an exemplar of clinical work with a family who sought services in the Family Nursing Unit at the University of Calgary, with the presenting concern of unresolved grief. This analysis describes the therapeutic conversation that occurred between the family and a team of nurse clinicians, where the young woman's beliefs about grief and mothering were distinguished as beliefs that were contributing to her emotional pain and her belief in her mothering capabilities. The nursing team offered alternative beliefs of which the family rapidly embraced and, subsequently, experienced diminishment of the suffering previously experienced.
PubMed ID
17099119 View in PubMed
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Clinical application of the 15-minute family interview: addressing the needs of postpartum families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171947
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2005 Feb;11(1):5-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Lorraine Holtslander
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, 107 Wiggins Road, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5E5. lorraine@holtslander.com
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2005 Feb;11(1):5-18
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Family Nursing
Fathers - psychology
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods
Male
Nursing Assessment - methods
Postnatal Care
Saskatchewan
Abstract
The purpose of this article is to describe the application of the 15-minute family interview to family-centered nursing practice on a postpartum unit. Guided by the five key components of the 15-minute family interview (manners, therapeutic conversation, genogram or ecomap, therapeutic questions, and commendations), clinical excerpts of interviews with families illustrate application to practice. The 15-minute family interview is not a strategic, decontextual nursing tool; rather, it is a flexible interview guide that is embedded in family nursing practice, in the relationship between the nurse and family and in the nurse's philosophical assumptions and obligations to do well by families.
PubMed ID
16287815 View in PubMed
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Collaboration. Parents on the healthcare team.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181185
Source
Can Nurse. 2004 Feb;100(2):26-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Edna Durbach
Jaye Kerzner
Author Affiliation
British Columbia's Children's Hospital, Vancouver.
Source
Can Nurse. 2004 Feb;100(2):26-8
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Child
Child, Hospitalized
Family Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Models, organizational
Parents
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Program Development
PubMed ID
15011494 View in PubMed
Less detail

Commendations, conversations, and life-changing realizations: teaching and practicing family nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144672
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2010 May;16(2):146-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Nancy J Moules
Hillary Johnstone
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. njmoules@ucalgary.ca
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2010 May;16(2):146-60
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Alberta
Attitude of Health Personnel
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Empathy
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Family Nursing - organization & administration
Grief
Humans
Morale
Narration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Theory
Philosophy, Nursing
Professional-Family Relations
Students, Nursing - psychology
Teaching - organization & administration
Terminal Care - psychology
Abstract
This article embeds a piece of reflective writing and analysis from an undergraduate nursing student about the integration of course content to practice in the nursing of families. Surrounding the reflection of the student, the course professor discusses the content, intent, history, and delivery of the family nursing course and examines how the theory taught is necessarily mirrored in the way it is taught and the ways that students are invited into experiencing and "practicing" the skills, philosophies, theories, and beliefs of nursing families well.
PubMed ID
20335497 View in PubMed
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A comparison of the cornerstones of public health nursing in Norway and in the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106744
Source
Public Health Nurs. 2014 Mar-Apr;31(2):153-66
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kari Glavin
Marjorie A Schaffer
Liv Halvorsrud
Lisbeth Gravdal Kvarme
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Diakonova University College, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Public Health Nurs. 2014 Mar-Apr;31(2):153-66
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Family Nursing
Female
Focus Groups
Home Health Nursing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurses, Public Health - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Public Health Nursing - organization & administration
School Nursing
United States
Abstract
This study describes a comparison of the values and beliefs foundational to community nursing practice in Norway with the Cornerstones of Public Health Nursing based on public health nursing practice in the United States.
Methods included a review of the literature and focus groups to determine primary beliefs and values foundational to nursing practice in family, school, and home care settings in Norway.
Authors reviewed documents written in English and Norwegian for content on values and beliefs represented in public health nursing. Data were gathered from two focus group meetings each with school, home care, and family health nurses in Norway (n = 19; n = 11).
Focus group questions addressed aspects of the values and beliefs of public health that are foundational to public health nursing. The researchers synthesized content themes of literature and focus groups.
Nine Norwegian cornerstones emerged from literature and focus groups. Six of the cornerstones were the same as the cornerstones from the United States, two were modified, and one new cornerstone emerged from the data.
The values and beliefs represented in the different modified cornerstones based on Norwegian community nursing practice capture the essence of public health nursing in Norway. The similarities between the two countries show that nurses have much in common, despite different health and governmental systems and laws.
PubMed ID
24117788 View in PubMed
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Connecting for change: networks as a vehicle for regional health reform the early experiences of the Child Health Network for the Greater Toronto Area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189664
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2002;15(2):41-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Shehnaz Alidina
Sheila Jarvis
Beverley Nickoloff
Jonathan Tolkin
Joann Trypuc
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2002;15(2):41-5
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Community Networks - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Family Nursing
Health Care Reform
Health Services Accessibility
Hospitals, Psychiatric - organization & administration
Humans
Organizational Innovation
Organizational Objectives
Quality of Health Care
Regional Medical Programs - organization & administration
Urban Population
Abstract
The Child Health Network (CHN) for the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) is a partnership of hospital, rehabilitation and community providers committed to developing a regional system to deliver high quality, accessible, family-centred care for mothers, newborns, children and youth. This article reviews the history and model of the CHN, assesses its achievements, and provides insights into the challenges and lessons learned by the network. Stemming from the CHN's commitment to quality, accessibility and efficiency, regionalization of maternal, newborn and children's services is emerging as a success story.
PubMed ID
12078357 View in PubMed
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98 records – page 1 of 10.