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Cultural remains in local and regional context on the central Alaska Peninsula: housepits, language, and cultural affinities at Marraatuq after 1000 B.P.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101947
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2010;47(2):97-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Patricia L McClenahan
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2010;47(2):97-103
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Anthropology, Cultural - education - history
Archaeology - education - history
Continental Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Family - ethnology - history - psychology
Family Health - ethnology
History, 15th Century
History, 16th Century
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
Housing - history
Humans
Language - history
Residence Characteristics - history
Abstract
Professor Dumond's research on the Alaska Peninsula provided information that prior to 1,000 years ago people of both sides of the Alaska Peninsula shared material culture and exhibited subsistence interests that persisted into historic times, During the Late Precontact Era (ca. 1100 A.D. to mid-1700s) these Alutiiq societies shared cultural traits including language, house styles, and material culture with their relatives and neighbors on Kodiak Island. Until recently, few data were available regarding potential variability in house construction techniques, or styles and functions of Alutiiq semi-subterranean houses of this era found on the Alaska Peninsula, This paper provides examples of a few known prehistoric and historic Alaska Peninsula and Kodiak Alutiiq houses and presents previously unreported data from archaeological tests at Marraatuq on the Central Alaska Peninsula, Taken together with Dumond's 1998-1999 field work at Leader Creek and archaeological research on Kodiak Island, the work provides further evidence that interregional interaction was strong during the Late Precontact Era. However, large population centers and ranked political hierarchies probably were not hallmarks of central Alaska Peninsula communities during the Late Precontact Era and historic times as they were on the Kodiak and Aleutian islands.
PubMed ID
21495284 View in PubMed
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Culture and Munchausen-by-proxy syndrome: the case of an 11-year-old boy presenting with hyperactivity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204662
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1998 Aug;43(6):632-5; discussion 635-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
E L Amirali
R. Bezonsky
R. McDonough
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Montreal Children's Hospital, Quebec.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1998 Aug;43(6):632-5; discussion 635-7
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - ethnology
Canada
Child
Culture
Family Health - ethnology
Family Therapy
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services Misuse
Humans
Male
Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy - diagnosis - ethnology - therapy
Psychomotor Agitation - diagnosis - etiology
Republic of Belarus - ethnology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To discuss some of the challenges presented to the clinician who deals with a possible Munchausen-by-proxy (MBP) syndrome.
The case of an 11-year-old boy presenting with hyperactivity is discussed. Information from the initial assessment and the 9-month follow-up period is presented. We highlight some cultural considerations as they apply to this immigrant family. A commentary by Dr H Schrier follows the presentation.
The positive outcome is discussed in relation to the validation of the diagnosis as well as to cultural issues.
Cultural issues and dynamic factors may be important when we consider the diagnosis of MBP syndrome in an immigrant family with different expectations from our health care system.
PubMed ID
9729693 View in PubMed
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Developing a plan for measuring outcomes in model systems of care for American Indian and Alaska Native children and youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6008
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2004;11(2):88-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Douglas K Novins
Michele King
Linda Son Stone
Author Affiliation
Cirles of Care Evaluation Technical Assistance Center, American Indian and Alaska Native Programs, Aurora, CO 80045-0508, USA. douglas.novins@uchsc.edu
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2004;11(2):88-98
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Community Health Planning - methods - standards
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Community Networks - organization & administration - standards
Delivery of Health Care - methods - organization & administration - standards
Family Health - ethnology
Health Planning Support
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Models, Theoretical
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods - standards
Program Evaluation - methods
United States
United States Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Abstract
The Circles of Care initiative emphasized the importance of developing an outcomes measurement plan that was consonant with the model system of care as well as community values and priorities. This analysis suggests that the Circles of Care grantees achieved this key programmatic objective, but that a major constraint was the tendency of funders, including the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (the funder of Circles of Care), to mandate their own outcomes measurement plans. Funders are encouraged to balance their needs for commonality of measures across programs for their own evaluation purposes with the needs of service providers to utilize measures that meet their unique programmatic and community contexts.
PubMed ID
15322977 View in PubMed
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Ethnicity, but not cancer family history, is related to response to a population-based mailed questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182470
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2004 Jan;14(1):36-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Cristina Mancuso
Gord Glendon
Lynn Anson-Cartwright
Ellen Juqing Shi
Irene Andrulis
Julia Knight
Author Affiliation
Ontario Familial Breast Cancer Registry, Ontario Cancer Institute, Division of Epidemiology and Statistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2004 Jan;14(1):36-43
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - ethnology - genetics
Family Health - ethnology
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - ethnology - genetics
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Participation - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Registries
Reminder Systems
Risk factors
SEER Program
Abstract
To determine if family history and ethnic background are factors affecting response to a mailed cancer family history questionnaire from the Ontario Familial Breast Cancer Registry.
Individuals diagnosed with primary invasive breast carcinomas (probands) were mailed a family history questionnaire, the first contact in a multi-stage process. This questionnaire obtained cancer family history and ethnicity data. After one month, a follow up telephone call was made to those who did not return this questionnaire and attempts were made to ask similar questions by telephone interview. Characteristics of those responding to the mailed questionnaire were compared to those who responded to the telephone interview only.
339 probands were included in this study: 242 returned a mailed version of the questionnaire; 57 completed the questionnaire over the phone. Cancer family history/genetic risk criteria was not significantly related to type of response. Probands identifying themselves as visible minorities were significantly less likely to respond to the mailed questionnaire than the telephone interview (11.6% vs. 22.8%, P=0.03).
Having a family history of cancer did not appear to influence response to a mailed questionnaire, but those reporting an ethnic/racial background other than White were more likely to respond to a telephone interview.
PubMed ID
14664778 View in PubMed
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The Family Education Diabetes Series (FEDS): community-based participatory research with a midwestern American Indian community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139476
Source
Nurs Inq. 2010 Dec;17(4):359-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Tai J Mendenhall
Jerica M Berge
Peter Harper
Betty GreenCrow
Nan LittleWalker
Sheila WhiteEagle
Steve BrownOwl
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine and CommunityHealth, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55414, USA. mend0009@umn.edu
Source
Nurs Inq. 2010 Dec;17(4):359-72
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - etiology
Family Health - ethnology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Midwestern United States - epidemiology
Obesity - complications
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Pilot Projects
Prejudice
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Residence Characteristics
Statistics as Topic
Young Adult
Abstract
Indigenous people around the globe tend to struggle with poorer health and well-being than their non-indigenous counterparts. One area that this is especially evident is in the epidemic of diabetes in North America's American Indians (AIs) - who evidence higher prevalence rates and concomitant disease-related complications than any other racial/ethnic group. As researchers and AI communities work together to transcend conventional top-down, service-delivery approaches to care, community-based participatory research is beginning to show promise as a way to partner contemporary biomedical knowledge with the lived-experience, wisdom, and customs of Indigenous people. This study describes the Family Education Diabetes Series (FEDS) as an example of such effort, and highlights pilot findings assessing its value and impact across key diabetes-relevant variables. Following 36 intervention participants across baseline, 3-month, and 6-month time periods, data show significant improvements in weight, blood pressure, and metabolic control (A1c). Strengths and limitations of this investigation are presented, along with suggestions about how to further advance and empirically test the work across other Indigenous communities.
PubMed ID
21059153 View in PubMed
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Family support and the child as health promoting agent in the Arctic - "the Inuit way".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124721
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2012;12(2):1977
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Ruth A Montgomery-Andersen
Ina Borup
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, Nuuk, Greenland. rumo@uni.gl
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2012;12(2):1977
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Welfare
Family Health - ethnology
Fetus
Health promotion
Humans
Inuits
Social Values
Abstract
In the context of the UN's 1990 'Convention on the Right's of the Child' 1990, and the associated definition of health promotion as a community's ability to recognise, define and make decisions on how to create a healthy society, this article describes and analyses how family support networks are conceived and present themselves in perinatal Inuit families.
This literature review conducted an initial and secondary search using the keywords and combinations of the keywords: healthy families, health promoting families, resiliency, Arctic, Inuit, Family support, was executed in PubMed, Popline, CSA and CINAHL. The tertiary literature search was then combined with literature gleaned from literature lists, and other relevant articles were selected.
Individual members of the family contribute to the health of the family, but the child is often the catalyst for health promotion within the family, not only the siblings to the unborn child, but also the unborn child. Perinatal entities create their own networks that support and develop concepts of family and support systems. Resiliency, kinship and ecocultural process within the family are concomitant to the health of perinatal family and of the children.
More research is needed that moves children from being viewed as the receivers of health towards being seen as the promoters of health and an important actor as health promoting agent within the family.
PubMed ID
22553986 View in PubMed
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31 records – page 1 of 4.