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Accuracy of family cancer history in breast cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217868
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 1994 Jul;3(4):321-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
B. Theis
N. Boyd
G. Lockwood
D. Tritchler
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 1994 Jul;3(4):321-7
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - genetics
Canada
Colonic Neoplasms - genetics
Death Certificates
Family Health
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medical History Taking
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - genetics
Prostatic Neoplasms - genetics
Questionnaires
Rectal Neoplasms - genetics
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
We assessed the validity of information reported by patients with breast cancer on cancer in first- and second-degree relatives. In Toronto, Canada, 165 patients completed mailed questionnaires about cancer in relatives and were then interviewed in person. Their reports were compared with relatives' hospital records, cancer registry or death records for presence of cancer, site and age at diagnosis. Questionnaire and interview reports agreed with records for 82-96% of reports on first-degree and 48-80% on second-degree relatives. Proband reports of cancer sites in first-degree relatives were generally accurate (breast 99%, ovary 100%, prostate 85%, colon 93%). Reports of cancer sites in second-degree relatives were accurate for prostate cancer but only for 85% of breast and 72% of colon cancers. Age at diagnosis of breast cancer was correct in 92% of cases in first-degree and 54% in second-degree relatives. The interview contributed additional information about the presence of cancer in second-degree relatives, and the site and age at diagnosis in first- and second-degree relatives. In a similar population the questionnaire alone should yield adequate data for identifying families that warrant further investigation.
PubMed ID
7950886 View in PubMed
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Advanced paternal age and parental history of schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131103
Source
Schizophr Res. 2011 Dec;133(1-3):125-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Brian Miller
Jaana Suvisaari
Jouko Miettunen
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Jari Haukka
Antti Tanskanen
Jouko Lönnqvist
Matti Isohanni
Brian Kirkpatrick
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Health Behavior, Medical College of Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, Georgia 30912, United States. brmiller@georgiahealth.edu
Source
Schizophr Res. 2011 Dec;133(1-3):125-32
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Family Health
Female
Finland
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Paternal Age
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
Advanced paternal age (APA) is a risk factor for nonaffective psychosis (NAP) in the offspring, although the mechanism(s) of this association are not clear. The aim of this study was to examine whether later childbearing can be explained by parental schizophrenia, and in doing so, further evaluate the "de novo mutation" hypothesis for the association between APA and NAP.
Using binary logistic regression, the association between APA and parental history of schizophrenia in the offspring, considering maternal and paternal history separately, was examined in 1) all persons with NAP born in Finland between 1950 and 1969 (Finnish NAP Cohort, n = 13,712), and 2) members of the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort (NFBC 1966, n = 10,224), a general population birth cohort.
In the Finnish NAP Cohort, having a mother with schizophrenia was associated with APA (Odds Ratio [OR] for linear trend = 1.20, 95% confidence interval 1.12-1.29, p
PubMed ID
21937198 View in PubMed
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Advanced paternal and grandpaternal age and schizophrenia: a three-generation perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130452
Source
Schizophr Res. 2011 Dec;133(1-3):120-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Emma M Frans
John J McGrath
Sven Sandin
Paul Lichtenstein
Abraham Reichenberg
Niklas Långström
Christina M Hultman
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Schizophr Res. 2011 Dec;133(1-3):120-4
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Family Health
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Parents
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - genetics
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Advanced paternal age has been linked with an increased risk of schizophrenia in the offspring. If age-related de novo mutations in the male germ line underlie this association, grandpaternal and paternal age would both be expected to influence the risk of schizophrenia. The aim of the current study was to explore the links between both paternal and grandpaternal age with respect to the risk of schizophrenia in a large, national register-based cohort.
We linked the Swedish Multi-Generation and Hospital Discharge Registers and compared parents' ages at offspring birth for 20,582 schizophrenia-affected and 100,176 non-affected individuals. Grandparents' ages at the birth of the parent were compared between 2511 affected and 15,619 non-affected individuals. The risk of schizophrenia was examined with logistic regression when the predictor variable (parent or grandparent age) varied across age strata.
After adjusting for maternal age, birth year and proband sex, we confirmed that offspring of older fathers had an increased risk of schizophrenia. Compared to those with paternal age 20-24years, those with fathers >55years had a two-fold increased risk of schizophrenia. With respect to grandparent age, older maternal (but not paternal) grandfather age was associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia. Compared to maternal grandfather age 20-24years, those with maternal grandfathers >55years had a significantly increased risk of schizophrenia (adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals; 2.79, 1.71-4.56). The pattern of results was essentially unchanged when we examined male and female probands separately.
This is the first study to report an association between grandpaternal age and risk of schizophrenia. The selective effect of advanced maternal grandfather age suggests that the biological mechanisms involving the X-chromosome may differentially contribute to the association between paternal age and offspring risk of schizophrenia.
Notes
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Comment In: Schizophr Res. 2012 Aug;139(1-3):267-822497795
PubMed ID
22000939 View in PubMed
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Age at diagnosis and age at death in familial prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98697
Source
Oncologist. 2009 Dec;14(12):1209-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Andreas Brandt
Justo Lorenzo Bermejo
Jan Sundquist
Kari Hemminki
Author Affiliation
Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Centre, Im Neuenheimer Feld 580, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany. andreas.brandt@dkfz.de
Source
Oncologist. 2009 Dec;14(12):1209-17
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Family Health
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatic Neoplasms - diagnosis - genetics - mortality
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: A family history of prostate cancer is associated with a higher risk for prostate cancer to first-degree relatives. If greater surveillance of men at familial risk is considered to be useful, population-based estimates of the differences in the age at diagnosis between familial and sporadic prostate cancer cases are needed. METHODS: The men in the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database were classified according to the number and type of affected first-degree relatives (father or brother) and according to the relative's age at diagnosis. The cumulative incidence of prostate cancer and cumulative prostate cancer-specific mortality were estimated using a stratified Cox model. RESULTS: The cumulative incidence was highest for men with multiple affected first-degree relatives, and it was higher for brothers than for sons of prostate cancer patients. The age to reach the same cumulative incidence as the general population at age 55 years decreased with decreasing age at diagnosis of the relative, ranging from 48.7 years (father diagnosed before 60 years of age) to 53.7 years (father diagnosed after 82 years of age). Prostate cancer-specific mortality was also related to the number and type of affected relatives but there was no clear evidence for a dependency on the age at diagnosis of the relative. CONCLUSIONS: Men with a father or a brother affected by prostate cancer are diagnosed and die at earlier ages than men without a family history of prostate cancer. This study should encourage further analysis in order to assess the risks and benefits of screening for prostate cancer in men at higher risk.
PubMed ID
19939895 View in PubMed
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Aggregation of lipoprotein and inflammatory parameters in families with a history of premature myocardial infarction: the Tallinn myocardial infarction study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154200
Source
Clin Chem Lab Med. 2008;46(11):1602-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Katrin Aasvee
Elvira Kurvinen
Jouko Sundvall
Matti Jauhiainen
Inna Tur
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia. katrin.aasvee@tai.ee
Source
Clin Chem Lab Med. 2008;46(11):1602-8
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute-Phase Proteins - metabolism
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Apolipoprotein A-I - blood
Apolipoproteins B - blood
Apolipoproteins E - genetics
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Child
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Family Health
Female
Finland
Humans
Lipoprotein(a) - blood
Lipoproteins - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The offspring of individuals with a history of premature myocardial infarction are at increased risk of premature coronary attacks. The aim of this study was to determine parent/offspring associations of coronary risk factors in families affected by premature myocardial infarction and to compare these to corresponding control families.
The cohort of cases consisted of 71 male survivors of myocardial infarction and their 128 descendants (aged 7-18 years). As control families, 85 randomly selected healthy males with their 66 descendants were investigated. Besides traditional risk factors, serum high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), apolipoprotein (apo) E phenotypes and lipoprotein(a) were analyzed.
In the offspring of the patients, fibrinogen and atherogenic lipoprotein parameters were higher than in the corresponding controls, but hsCRP, lipoprotein(a) and anthropometric data did not differ between the groups. The adult-offspring positive correlations were detected in fibrinogen and in almost all measured lipoprotein fractions in the affected families; amongst the controls, the association was observed only for triglyceride levels. Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated independent association of offspring apoB, apoA-I and fibrinogen levels with a family history of premature myocardial infarction.
The most informative predictors of future coronary attacks during childhood are apoB-100 and apoB/apoA-I ratio; serum hsCRP and lipoprotein(a) do not have predictive value in childhood.
PubMed ID
19012525 View in PubMed
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An anthroposophic lifestyle and intestinal microflora in infancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31230
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2002 Dec;13(6):402-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Johan S Alm
Jackie Swartz
Bengt Björkstén
Lars Engstrand
Johan Engström
Inger Kühn
Gunnar Lilja
Roland Möllby
Elisabeth Norin
Göran Pershagen
Claudia Reinders
Karin Wreiber
Annika Scheynius
Author Affiliation
Sachs' Children's Clinic, Söder Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Johan.Alm@sos.ki.se
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2002 Dec;13(6):402-11
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anthroposophy - psychology
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Colony Count, Microbial
Comparative Study
Family Health
Feces - chemistry - microbiology
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - diagnosis - microbiology - therapy
Infant
Infant Food - microbiology
Infant Welfare
Infant, Newborn
Intestines - microbiology
Life Style
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Statistics
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The intestinal flora is considered to have an impact on the development of the immune system. In the anthroposophic lifestyle, a diet comprising vegetables spontaneously fermented by lactobacilli, and a restrictive use of antibiotics, anti-pyretics and vaccinations, is typical. The aim of this study was to assess the gut flora in infants in relation to certain lifestyle characteristics associated with anthroposophy. Sixty-nine children
PubMed ID
12485315 View in PubMed
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An association between high birth weight and schizophrenia in a Finnish schizophrenia family study sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133792
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2011 Dec 30;190(2-3):181-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-30-2011
Author
Asko Wegelius
Annamari Tuulio-Henriksson
Maiju Pankakoski
Jari Haukka
Ulriika Lehto
Tiina Paunio
Jouko Lönnqvist
Jaana Suvisaari
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Helsinki, Finland. asko.wegelius@hus.fi
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2011 Dec 30;190(2-3):181-6
Date
Dec-30-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Birth Weight - genetics
Family Health
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - genetics - mortality
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Longitudinal cohort studies have implicated an association between both low and high birth weight and schizophrenia. It has been suggested that schizophrenia associated genes could augment an individual's susceptibility to adverse prenatal and perinatal environmental events. We investigated the association between birth weight and schizophrenia in a large Finnish schizophrenia family study sample. We utilized the birth weight data of 1051 offspring from 315 Finnish families with at least one offspring with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. We used a multivariate COX frailty model to analyze the effect of birth weight on the risk of developing schizophrenia within the families. Using information from the Medication Reimbursement Register and patient interviews, we further investigated the association of maternal type 2 diabetes and schizophrenia risk among offspring. High birth weight (>4000g) was associated with a 1.68-fold increase in schizophrenia susceptibility. Maternal diabetes at the time of data collection, a proxy for gestational diabetes, was associated with a 1.66-fold increase in the risk of developing schizophrenia among offspring. Our results corroborate recent findings showing an association between high birth weight and schizophrenia. Our results also point to a potential birth-weight independent association between maternal type 2 diabetes and schizophrenia among offspring.
PubMed ID
21664700 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of the life quality in children with phenylketonuria].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263907
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2014;(11-12):39-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
T V Bushueva
I V Vinyarskaya
V V Chernikov
T E Borovik
L M Kuzenkova
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2014;(11-12):39-45
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Diet Therapy - methods
Early Diagnosis
Early Medical Intervention - methods - statistics & numerical data
Family Health
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neonatal Screening
Parents - psychology
Phenylketonurias - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Russia - epidemiology
Time-to-Treatment
Abstract
Phenylketonuria (PKU) - the most common inherited disorder of amino acid metabolism, identified in Russia by neonatal screening. The results of dietary treatment demonstrate a positive effect. However, the quality of PKU patients life remains unknown.
The aim of the study was to assess the quality of PKU children life in comparison with their healthy peers, also depending on the treatment onset and the patient's age.
The study involved 64 pairs - PKU child and one of his parents. It was used the common questionnaire survey Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQLtm4. 0, Varni et al., USA, 2001) and the program SPSS v. 14.0 (US) for statistical processing of the results.
The statistically significant (p
PubMed ID
25971125 View in PubMed
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Association of Mortality With the Death of a Sibling in Childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284613
Source
JAMA Pediatr. 2017 Jun 01;171(6):538-545
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-01-2017
Author
Yongfu Yu
Zeyan Liew
Sven Cnattingius
Jørn Olsen
Mogens Vestergaard
Bo Fu
Erik Thorlund Parner
Guoyou Qin
Naiqing Zhao
Jiong Li
Source
JAMA Pediatr. 2017 Jun 01;171(6):538-545
Date
Jun-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Bereavement
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Family Health - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Mortality
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Siblings
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The death of a close relative is associated with an increased mortality risk among the bereaved, but much less is known about the potential association of the death of a sibling in childhood with mortality in this population.
To examine the association between sibling death in childhood and subsequent mortality risk.
This population-based cohort study of 5?005?029 participants evaluated linked national registers in Denmark (January 1, 1973, through December 31, 2009) and Sweden (January 1, 1973, through December 31, 2008). A total of 2?060?354 Danish and 2?944?675 Swedish children who survived the first 6 months of their life were included. We excluded 14 children who died of the same external cause as their siblings within 30 days. Data were analyzed from November 2, 2015, through October 14, 2016.
Participants were classified as exposed if a sibling died in childhood (age
PubMed ID
28437534 View in PubMed
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Association of Short-Term Mortality of Venous Thromboembolism with Family History of Venous Thromboembolism and Charlson Comorbidity Index.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299286
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2019 Jan; 119(1):48-55
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Bengt Zöller
MirNabi Pirouzifard
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, Region Skåne, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2019 Jan; 119(1):48-55
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anticoagulants
Comorbidity
Family Health
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Pulmonary Embolism - complications - epidemiology - mortality
ROC Curve
Registries
Risk assessment
Sweden
Venous Thromboembolism - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Venous Thrombosis - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
Studies on short-term prognosis of venous thromboembolism (VTE) that take family history of VTE and Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) into account are sparse. The aim was to investigate the importance of family history of VTE and CCI for short-term mortality after a first episode of VTE. Using Swedish medical databases, we conducted a 90-day nationwide cohort study of 41,700 Swedish born patients with a first-time VTE (July 2005-August 2012). Patients diagnosed with VTE and prescribed anticoagulant treatment were included. Mortality hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined with Cox regression. Patients with first-degree (sibling/parent) family history of VTE (n?=?11,405, 27.4%) had significantly lower CCI than those without family history. Independent risk factors for 90-day mortality in the adjusted model were: female sex (HR?=?1.19, 95% CI: 1.09-1.29), increasing age (HR?=?1.02, 95% CI: 1.01-1.02 per year), pulmonary embolism (HR?=?1.21, 95% CI: 1.11-1.32) or combined pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis (HR?=?1.60, 95% CI: 1.27-2.01) compared with deep venous thrombosis, CCI?=?1 (HR?=?2.93, 95% CI: 2.32-3.72), CCI?=?2 (HR?=?8.65, 95% CI: 7.16-10.46) or CCI?=?3 (HR?=?22.25, 95% CI: 18.73-26.44) compared with CCI?=?0. Having one or two or more affected first-degree relatives with VTE was associated with lower mortality, HR?=?0.83 (95% CI: 0.74-0.92) and HR?=?0.65 (95% CI: 0.51-0.85), respectively. The mortality rate was 0.70% in patients with a CCI of zero. In receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the area under the ROC curve for CCI was 0.84 (0.83-0.95). Family history of VTE is associated with lower mortality while CCI is a strong predictor for short-term mortality in VTE. Co-morbidities are important for risk assessment of VTE.
PubMed ID
30597499 View in PubMed
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