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Adding a baby to the equation. married and cohabiting women's relationship satisfaction in the transition to parenthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126051
Source
Fam Process. 2012 Mar;51(1):122-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Øystein Mortensen
Torbjørn Torsheim
Ole Melkevik
Frode Thuen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. oystein.mortensen@uib.no
Source
Fam Process. 2012 Mar;51(1):122-39
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Confidence Intervals
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Models, Psychological
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Self Report
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Time Factors
Women's health
Abstract
The trajectory of relationship satisfaction among married and cohabiting women in their transition to parenthood was compared in a potential sample of 71,504 women taking part in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Prospective longitudinal data were collected in 4 waves over a 2-year period starting 6 months prebirth. Results from latent curve models suggested that married and cohabiting women experience similar negative change in relationship satisfaction during the transition to parenthood. However, cohabiting women start off and stay less satisfied throughout the transition period, suggesting the presence of a negative cohabitation effect that prevailed after controlling for various covariates. Extending investigation on the cohabitation effect to the transition to parenthood, and replicating it in a Scandinavian context, is discussed in relation to the understanding of what causes the cohabitation effect, and its clinical implications.
PubMed ID
22428715 View in PubMed
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Adverse childhood experiences among women prisoners: relationships to suicide attempts and drug abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256618
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2014 Feb;60(1):40-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Christine Friestad
Rustad Åse-Bente
Ellen Kjelsberg
Author Affiliation
1Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2014 Feb;60(1):40-6
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Abuse - diagnosis - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Comorbidity
Crime - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Life Change Events
Likelihood Functions
Norway
Prisoners - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Spouse Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Statistics as Topic
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Women prisoners are known to suffer from an accumulation of factors known to increase the risk for several major health problems. This study examines the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and the relationship between such experiences and suicide attempts and drug use among incarcerated women in Norway.
A total of 141 women inmates (75% of all eligible) were interviewed using a structured interview guide covering information on demographics and a range of ACE related to abuse and neglect, and household dysfunction. The main outcome variables were attempted suicide and adult drug abuse.
Emotional, physical and sexual abuse during childhood was experienced by 39%, 36% and 19%, respectively, and emotional and physical neglect by 31% and 33%, respectively. Looking at the full range of ACE, 17% reported having experienced none, while 34% reported having experienced more than five ACEs. After controlling for age, immigrant background and marital status, the number of ACEs significantly increased the risk of attempted suicide and current drug abuse.
The associations observed between early life trauma and later health risk behaviour indicate the need for early prevention. The findings also emphasize the important role of prison health services in secondary prevention among women inmates.
PubMed ID
23045353 View in PubMed
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Adverse childhood experiences in relation to mood and anxiety disorders in a population-based sample of active military personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124248
Source
Psychol Med. 2013 Jan;43(1):73-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
J. Sareen
C A Henriksen
S L Bolton
T O Afifi
M B Stein
G J G Asmundson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. sareen@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
Psychol Med. 2013 Jan;43(1):73-84
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Domestic Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology
Mood Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - complications - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Although it has been posited that exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) increases vulnerability to deployment stress, previous literature in this area has demonstrated conflicting results. Using a cross-sectional population-based sample of active military personnel, the present study examined the relationship between ACEs, deployment related stressors and mood and anxiety disorders.
Data were analyzed from the 2002 Canadian Community Health Survey-Canadian Forces Supplement (CCHS-CFS; n = 8340, age 18-54 years, response rate 81%). The following ACEs were self-reported retrospectively: childhood physical abuse, childhood sexual abuse, economic deprivation, exposure to domestic violence, parental divorce/separation, parental substance abuse problems, hospitalization as a child, and apprehension by a child protection service. DSM-IV mood and anxiety disorders [major depressive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic attacks/disorder and social phobia] were assessed using the composite international diagnostic interview (CIDI).
Even after adjusting for the effects of deployment-related traumatic exposures (DRTEs), exposure to ACEs was significantly associated with past-year mood or anxiety disorder among men [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.34, 99% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.73, p
PubMed ID
22608015 View in PubMed
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The alliance in couple therapy: Partner influence, early change, and alliance patterns in a naturalistic sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140464
Source
J Consult Clin Psychol. 2010 Oct;78(5):635-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Morten G Anker
Jesse Owen
Barry L Duncan
Jacqueline A Sparks
Author Affiliation
Bufetat, Familievernkontoret i Vestfold, Tønsberg, Norway.
Source
J Consult Clin Psychol. 2010 Oct;78(5):635-45
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Couples Therapy - methods
Family Conflict - psychology
Feedback
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Professional-Patient Relations
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between the alliance and outcome in couple therapy and examine whether the alliance predicted outcomes over and above early change. The authors also investigated partner influence and gender and sought to identify couple alliance patterns that predicted couple outcomes.
The authors examined the alliances and outcomes at posttreatment and follow-up of 250 couples seeking treatment for marital distress in a naturalistic setting. The Session Rating Scale was used to measure the alliance; the Outcome Rating Scale and Locke Wallace Marital Adjustment Scale were used to measure outcomes. Couples were White, Euro-Scandinavian, and heterosexual, with a mean age of 38.5 years and average number of years together of 11.8. On a subsample (n = 118) that included couples with 4 or more sessions, the authors investigated the relationship between the alliance and outcome controlling for early change, and patterns of alliance development were delineated.
In the full sample, first-session alliances were not predictive of outcomes, but last-session alliances were predictive for both individuals and their partners. In the subsample, third-session alliances predicted outcome significantly above early change (d = 0.25) that exceeded the reliable change index. Couple alliances that started over the mean and increased were associated with significantly more couples achieving reliable or clinically significant change. Gender influences were mixed.
Given the current findings suggesting a potential alliance impact over and above symptom relief as well as the importance of ascending alliance scores, continuous assessment of the alliance appears warranted.
PubMed ID
20873899 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological study of ADHD and conduct disorder: Does family conflict moderate the association?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283789
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2017 Apr;52(4):457-464
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Sigfusdottir
Asgeirsdottir
Hall
Sigurdsson
Young
Gudjonsson
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2017 Apr;52(4):457-464
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology
Conduct Disorder - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Risk factors
Abstract
To examine the role of family conflict in the relationship between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder (CD).
A cross-sectional national population survey was carried out among 10,838 14-16 year old students in all secondary schools in Iceland. Three latent measures, financial status, ADHD and CD, and one observed measure, family structure, were included in the study. A structural equation model was used to evaluate direct effects between ADHD and CD for four different groups; females and males, experiencing family conflict and those not experiencing family conflict.
ADHD was significantly and positively associated with CD for all groups. When controlling for financial status and family structure it was found that ADHD was positively and significantly associated with CD for adolescent females and males not experiencing family conflict as well as for those experiencing family conflict. The link between ADHD and CD was significantly stronger for those adolescents who had experienced family conflict compared to those who had not experienced family conflict. These results suggest that family conflict moderates the association between ADHD and CD for both girls and boys.
The results of this study indicate that family environment and ADHD symptoms are important when predicting CD among adolescent youth. Most notably, family conflict exacerbates the effects of ADHD symptoms on CD among both females and males.
PubMed ID
28236147 View in PubMed
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Associations between sexual abuse and family conflict/violence, self-injurious behavior, and substance use: the mediating role of depressed mood and anger.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135401
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2011 Mar;35(3):210-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Bryndis Bjork Asgeirsdottir
Inga Dora Sigfusdottir
Gisli H Gudjonsson
Jon Fridrik Sigurdsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, De Crespigny Park, Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AF, UK.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2011 Mar;35(3):210-9
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anger
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - etiology - psychology
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Humans
Iceland
Linear Models
Male
Questionnaires
Schools
Self-Assessment
Self-Injurious Behavior - etiology - psychology
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Students
Substance-Related Disorders - etiology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine whether depressed mood and anger mediate the effects of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence on self-injurious behavior and substance use.
A cross-sectional national survey was conducted including 9,085 16-19 year old students attending all high schools in Iceland in 2004. Participants reported frequency of sexual abuse, family conflict/violence, self-injurious behavior, substance use, depressed mood, and anger.
Sexual abuse and family conflict/violence had direct effects on self-injurious behavior and substance use among both genders, when controlling for age, family structure, parental education, anger, and depressed mood. More importantly, the indirect effects of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence on self-injurious behavior among both males and females were twice as strong through depressed mood as through anger, while the indirect effects of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence on substance use were only significant through anger.
These results indicate that in cases of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence, substance use is similar to externalizing behavior, where anger seems to be a key mediating variable, opposed to internalizing behavior such as self-injurious behavior, where depressed mood is a more critical mediator.
Practical implications highlight the importance of focusing on a range of emotions, including depressed mood and anger, when working with stressed adolescents in prevention and treatment programs for self-injurious behavior and substance use.
PubMed ID
21481460 View in PubMed
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Atomoxetine improves patient and family coping in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in Swedish children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150784
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2009 Dec;18(12):725-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Pär Svanborg
Gunilla Thernlund
Per A Gustafsson
Bruno Hägglöf
Alexander Schacht
Björn Kadesjö
Author Affiliation
Eli Lilly Sweden AB, Box 721, 169 27 Solna, Sweden. svanborg_par@lilly.com
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2009 Dec;18(12):725-35
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adaptation, Psychological - drug effects
Adrenergic Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - drug therapy - psychology
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - psychology
Caregivers - psychology
Child
Child Rearing
Combined Modality Therapy
Cost of Illness
Double-Blind Method
Education
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Harm Reduction
Humans
Male
Parenting - psychology
Propylamines - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Quality of Life - psychology
Self Concept
Sweden
Abstract
This 10-week study assessed the efficacy of atomoxetine in combination with psychoeducation compared to placebo and psychoeducation in the improvement of Quality of Life in Swedish stimulant-naive children and adolescents with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. A total of 99 patients were treated with atomoxetine (49 patients) or placebo (50 patients) for 10 weeks and assessed regarding broader areas of functioning using the Quality of Life measures Child Health and Illness Profile-Child Edition (CHIP-CE), Family Strain Index [FSI; equivalent to the Family Burden of Illness Module used in the study], Appraisal of Stress in Child-Rearing (ASCR), Five to fifteen (FTF), "I think I am" ("Jag tycker jag är"), and Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R) before and after the active treatment phase. Simultaneously, the patients' parents participated in a 4-session psychoeducation program. A statistically significant difference in favor of atomoxetine was seen in the improvement from baseline to study endpoint for the CHIP-CE domains "Achievement" and "Risk avoidance", for the FSI total score, for the ASCR section (I) domain "Child as a burden", for all FTF domains except for "Language and Speech", and for the CDRS-R total score. No difference between treatment groups was observed in the patient-assessed evaluation of self-esteem using the "I think I am" scale. Atomoxetine combined with psychoeducation had a positive effect on various everyday coping abilities of the patients as well as their families during 10 weeks of treatment, whereas the patients' self-image and the parents' image of the climate in the family were not significantly improved.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19466476 View in PubMed
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Breaking the cycle/mending the hoop: adverse childhood experiences among incarcerated American Indian/Alaska Native women in New Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86815
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2008 Mar;29(3):300-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
De Ravello Lori
Abeita Jessica
Brown Pam
Author Affiliation
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. lderavello@cdc.gov
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2008 Mar;29(3):300-15
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Domestic Violence - psychology
Family Characteristics
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Life Change Events
Middle Aged
New Mexico
Prisoners - psychology
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Survivors - psychology
Abstract
Incarcerated American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women have multiple physical, social, and emotional concerns, many of which may stem from adverse childhood experiences (ACE). We interviewed 36 AI/AN women incarcerated in the New Mexico prison system to determine the relationship between ACE and adult outcomes. ACE assessment included physical neglect, dysfunctional family (e.g., household members who abused substances, were mentally ill or suicidal, or who were incarcerated), violence witnessed in the home, physical abuse, and sexual abuse. The most prevalent ACE was dysfunctional family (75%), followed by witnessing violence (72%), sexual abuse (53%), physical abuse (42%), and physical neglect (22%). ACE scores were positively associated with arrests for violent offenses, lifetime suicide attempt(s), and intimate partner violence.
PubMed ID
18350429 View in PubMed
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The brief family relationship scale: a brief measure of the relationship dimension in family functioning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258384
Source
Assessment. 2014 Feb;21(1):67-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Carlotta Ching Ting Fok
James Allen
David Henry
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, USA.
Source
Assessment. 2014 Feb;21(1):67-72
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Family
Family Conflict - psychology
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Male
Models, Psychological
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Rural Population
Social Environment
Social Values
Abstract
The Relationship dimension of the Family Environment Scale, which consists of the Cohesion, Expressiveness, and Conflict subscales, measures a person's perception of the quality of his or her family relationship functioning. This study investigates an adaptation of the Relationship dimension of the Family Environment Scale for Alaska Native youth. The authors tested the adapted measure, the Brief Family Relationship Scale, for psychometric properties and internal structure with 284 12- to 18-year-old predominately Yup'ik Eskimo Alaska Native adolescents from rural, remote communities. This non-Western cultural group is hypothesized to display higher levels of collectivism traditionally organized around an extended kinship family structure. Results demonstrate a subset of the adapted items function satisfactorily, a three-response alternative format provided meaningful information, and the subscale's underlying structure is best described through three distinct first-order factors, organized under one higher order factor. Convergent and discriminant validity of the Brief Family Relationship Scale was assessed through correlational analysis.
PubMed ID
22084400 View in PubMed
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Childhood adversities, adulthood life events and depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142673
Source
J Affect Disord. 2010 Dec;127(1-3):130-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Jyrki Korkeila
Jussi Vahtera
Hermann Nabi
Mika Kivimäki
Katariina Korkeila
Markku Sumanen
Karoliina Koskenvuo
Markku Koskenvuo
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Satakunta Hospital District, Finland. jyrki.korkeila@utu.fi
Source
J Affect Disord. 2010 Dec;127(1-3):130-8
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Family Conflict - psychology
Finland
Hospitalization
Humans
Life Change Events
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Psychosocial Deprivation
Risk factors
Statistics as Topic
Young Adult
Abstract
The role of childhood adversities in predicting adulthood depression has been suggested to be complex and in need of additional comprehensive studies.
This investigation set out to examine whether increased exposure to life events (LEs) in adulthood mediates the association between childhood adversities and adulthood depression.
This study is based on a random health survey sample from the Finnish working-aged population (n=16,877) with a follow-up of up to 7 years. Depression was identified by Beck Depression Inventory, records of antidepressant prescriptions and hospitalization due to depression obtained from national health registers.
Childhood adversities were associated with an increased likelihood of experiencing a high number of LEs in adulthood and their perceived burdensomeness. The mean number of new LEs correlated significantly (P
PubMed ID
20569993 View in PubMed
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39 records – page 1 of 4.