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Associations between sociocultural home environmental factors and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5-year olds: BRA-study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291600
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:310-320
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-01-2017
Author
Anne Lene Kristiansen
Mona Bjelland
Anne Himberg-Sundet
Nanna Lien
Lene Frost Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, PO Box 1046 Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: a.l.kristiansen@medisin.uio.no.
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:310-320
Date
Oct-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - ethnology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Family Characteristics - ethnology
Female
Fruit
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Healthy Diet - ethnology
Humans
Male
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Parenting - ethnology
Parents
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Principal Component Analysis
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
The home environment is the first environment to shape childhood dietary habits and food preferences, hence greater understanding of home environmental factors associated with vegetable consumption among young children is needed. The objective has been to examine questionnaire items developed to measure the sociocultural home environment of children focusing on vegetables and to assess the psychometric properties of the resulting factors. Further, to explore associations between the environmental factors and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5 year olds. Parents (n 633) were invited to participate and filled in a questionnaire assessing the child's vegetable intake and factors potentially influencing this, along with a 24-h recall of their child's fruit and vegetable intake. Children's fruit and vegetable intakes at two meals in one day in the kindergarten were observed by researchers. Principal components analysis was used to examine items assessing the sociocultural home environment. Encouragement items resulted in factors labelled "reactive encouragement", "child involvement" and "reward". Modelling items resulted in the factors labelled "active role model" and "practical role model". Items assessing negative parental attitudes resulted in the factor labelled "negative parental attitudes" and items assessing family pressure/demand resulted in the factor labelled "family demand". The psychometric properties of the factors were for most satisfactory. Linear regression of the associations between vegetable intake and the factors showed, as expected, generally positive associations with "child involvement", "practical role model" and "family demand", and negative associations with "negative parental attitudes" and "reward". Unexpectedly, "reactive encouragement" was negatively associated with vegetable consumption. In conclusion, associations between sociocultural home environmental factors and children's vegetable consumption showed both expected and unexpected associations some of which differed by maternal education - pointing to a need for further comparable studies.
PubMed ID
28676449 View in PubMed
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Canadian mock juror attitudes and decisions in domestic violence cases involving asian and white interracial and intraracial couples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121202
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2013 Mar;28(4):667-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Evelyn M Maeder
Annik Mossière
Liann Cheung
Author Affiliation
Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada. evelyn_maeder@carleton.ca
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2013 Mar;28(4):667-84
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Attitude
Canada
Crime Victims - psychology
Decision Making
Domestic Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Emotions
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Family Characteristics - ethnology
Female
Humans
Male
Prejudice - psychology
Sex Distribution
Social Perception
Students - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study manipulated the race of the defendant and the victim (White/White, White/Asian, Asian/Asian, and Asian/White) in a domestic violence case to examine the potential prejudicial impact of race on juror decision making. A total of 181 undergraduate students read a trial transcript involving an allegation of spousal abuse in which defendant and victim race were manipulated using photographs. They then provided a verdict and confidence rating, a sentence, and responsibility attributions, and completed various scales measuring attitudes toward wife abuse and women. Findings revealed that female jurors were harsher toward the defendant than were male jurors. When controlling for attitudes toward Asians, jurors found the defendant guilty more often in cases involving interracial couples, as compared to same-race couples. Path analyses revealed various factors and attitudes involved in domestic violence trial outcomes. Findings contribute to the scarce literature on legal proceedings involving Asians, particularly in domestic violence cases. Outcomes also provide a model for relevant factors and characteristics of jurors in domestic violence cases. Roadblocks inherent in jury research are also discussed.
PubMed ID
22929345 View in PubMed
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Changing roles in Sami families--a case illustration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35535
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1995;54 Suppl 1:42-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
V. Stordahl
Author Affiliation
Regional Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1995;54 Suppl 1:42-6
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Ethnic Groups
Family - ethnology - psychology
Family Characteristics - ethnology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Social Change
Abstract
During the last 20-30 years the Sami society has undergone an accelerating process of change. A planned national policy to integrate the Samis into the Norwegian nation state making them "equal members of our nation state", has resulted in dramatic changes in the standard of living, the educational patterns, and the structure of settlement, occupation and industry. This process of change has dramatically changed the life situation of the Sami people. This paper will examine how these external macroprocesses have changed the role and responsibilities of the family and its members. Special consideration will be given to gender and generational aspects.
PubMed ID
7639902 View in PubMed
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Culture and postpartum mood problems: similarities and differences in the experiences of first- and second-generation Canadian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115840
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2013 Apr;24(2):162-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Lana Mamisachvili
Paola Ardiles
Grazyna Mancewicz
Sherry Thompson
Kapri Rabin
Lori E Ross
Author Affiliation
Women's College Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2013 Apr;24(2):162-70
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Characteristics - ethnology
Family Relations - ethnology
Female
Humans
Mood Disorders - ethnology
Puerperal Disorders - ethnology
Self Concept
Social Stigma
Abstract
Few studies have examined the role of culture in a woman's experience of postpartum mood problems (PPMP). This study explored differences and similarities in experiences of PPMP between first- and second-generation Canadian women.
In this exploratory qualitative study, we interviewed nine first-generation and eight second-generation women who were clients of the Women's Health Centre at St. Joseph's Health Centre in Toronto, Canada. Using semistructured interviews, we explored how women perceived and experienced PPMP.
Four themes reflected cultural issues: PPMP stigma, relationship with parents/in-laws, internalization of society's expectations of motherhood, and identity issues/relationship with self.
The results of this study contribute to a limited literature on possible contributing factors to PPMP and can inform development of resources for delivering culturally appropriate mental health care for women dealing with PPMP.
PubMed ID
23460457 View in PubMed
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Development and validation of a surname list to define Chinese ethnicity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170056
Source
Med Care. 2006 Apr;44(4):328-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Hude Quan
Fulin Wang
Donald Schopflocher
Colleen Norris
P Diane Galbraith
Peter Faris
Michelle M Graham
Merril L Knudtson
William A Ghali
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. hquan@ucalgary.ca
Source
Med Care. 2006 Apr;44(4):328-33
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - classification - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Data Collection - methods
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Emigration and Immigration
Family Characteristics - ethnology
Female
Humans
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Names
Abstract
Surnames have the potential to accurately identify ancestral origins as they are passed on from generation to generation. In this study, we developed and validated a Chinese surname list to define Chinese ethnicity.
We conducted a literature review, a panel review, and a telephone survey in a randomly selected sample from a Canadian city in 2003 to develop a Chinese surname list. The list was then validated to data from the Canadian Community Health Survey. Both surveys collected information on self-reported ethnicity and surname.
Of the 112,452 people analyzed in the Canadian Community Health Survey, 1.6% were self-reported as Chinese. This was similar to the 1.5% identified by the surname list. Compared with self-reported Chinese ethnicity (reference standard), the surname list had 77.7% sensitivity, 80.5% positive predictive value, 99.7% specificity, and 99.6% negative predictive value. When stratifying by sex and marital status, the positive predictive value was 78.9% for married women and 83.6% for never married women.
The Chinese surname list appears to be valid in identifying Chinese ethnicity. The validity may depend on the geographic origins and Chinese dialects in given populations.
PubMed ID
16565633 View in PubMed
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43 records – page 1 of 5.