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1350 records – page 1 of 135.

229 people, 15,000 body parts: pathologists help solve Swissair 111's grisly puzzles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203179
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Jan 26;160(2):241-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-26-1999
Author
N. Robb
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Jan 26;160(2):241-3
Date
Jan-26-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation
Attitude of Health Personnel
Coroners and Medical Examiners - psychology
DNA Fingerprinting
Family - psychology
Grief
Humans
Nova Scotia
Professional-Family Relations
Abstract
Only 1 of the 229 passengers and crew members killed when Swissair Flight 111 crashed off Nova Scotia in September was visually identifiable. Identifying everyone else on board involved medical and dental detective work of the first order.
PubMed ID
9951448 View in PubMed
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[A blow in the face. Interview by Mette Fjordbo.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73399
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1993 Jan 20;93(3):4-6, 23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-1993

Abuse is in the eye of the beholder. Report by family members about abuse of demented persons in home care. A total population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73259
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Dec;21(4):247-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
M. Grafström
A. Nordberg
B. Winblad
Author Affiliation
Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Dec;21(4):247-55
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Dementia - nursing
Elder Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Family - psychology
Female
Health status
Home Nursing
Humans
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Mental Status Schedule
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In a population-based study 219 family members of cognitively impaired elderly (casegroup) and 255 family members of cognitively healthy elderly (control-group) were interviewed about their situation as a caregiver to an old person. Twenty-six family members in the case-group reported abusive behavior in the care of the elderly at home. These family members are compared with 154 family members in the control-group, reporting other coping strategies than abusive. In the abusive group most of the elderly were in a mild stage of dementia, and the family members reported more strain in the care situation. The family members were older, judged their health as deteriorated, and were mostly living together with the dependent elderly.
PubMed ID
8310277 View in PubMed
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Abusive relationships in families of women with borderline personality disorder, anorexia nervosa and a control group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193394
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2001 Aug;189(8):522-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
L. Laporte
H. Guttman
Author Affiliation
Allan Memorial Institute, Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2001 Aug;189(8):522-31
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Domestic Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Nuclear Family - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Abstract
In a group of intact families, we examined the rates and parameters of verbal, physical, and sexual abuse in 35 women with borderline personality disorder (BPD), 34 women with anorexia nervosa (AN), and 33 women without a clinical history (NC); their experience of multiple abuse and its correlation with their SCL-90-R scores; and their reports of abuse of their siblings. Corroboration of abuse was obtained from some parents in each group. Women with BPD suffered more intrafamilial verbal and physical abuse. Whereas AN and NC women experienced relatively rare single events of extrafamilial sexual abuse at an older age, those with BPD suffered repeated intrafamilial sexual abuse at a younger age and also suffered more multiple abuse. All multiply abused women had more psychopathology. Siblings were reported abused in the same proportions as subjects; many parents of BPDs corroborated their daughters' reports of all three forms of abuse.
PubMed ID
11531204 View in PubMed
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Acceptance of guideline recommendations and perceived implementation of coronary heart disease prevention among primary care physicians in five European countries: the Reassessing European Attitudes about Cardiovascular Treatment (REACT) survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47472
Source
Fam Pract. 2002 Dec;19(6):596-604
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
F D Richard Hobbs
Leif Erhardt
Author Affiliation
Division of Primary Care, Public and Occupational Health, Department of Primary Care and General Practice, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, UK. f.d.r.hobbs@bham.ac.uk
Source
Fam Pract. 2002 Dec;19(6):596-604
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chi-Square Distribution
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
France
Germany
Great Britain
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - prevention & control
Interviews
Italy
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Physicians, Family - psychology
Primary Health Care
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Although primary care is the major target of coronary heart disease (CHD) clinical recommendations, little is known of how community physicians view guidelines and their implementation. The REACT survey was designed to assess the views, and perceived implementation, of CHD and lipid treatment guidelines among primary care physicians. METHODS: Semi-structured validated telephone interviews were conducted, in the relevant native tongue, with 754 randomly selected primary care physicians (GPs and family doctors) in five European countries (France, Germany, Italy, Sweden and the UK). RESULTS: Most physicians (89%) agreed with the content of current guidelines and reported use of them (81%). However, only 18% of physicians believed that guidelines were being implemented to a major extent. Key barriers to greater implementation of guidelines were seen as lack of time (38% of all physicians), prescription costs (30%), and patient compliance (17%). Suggestions for ways to improve implementation centred on more education, both for physicians themselves (29%) and patients (25%); promoting, publicizing or increasing guideline availability (23%); simplifying the guidelines (17%); and making them clearer (12%). Physicians perceived diabetes to be the most important risk factor for CHD, followed by hypertension and raised LDL-C. Most physicians (92%) believe their patients do associate high cholesterol levels with CHD. After establishing that a patient is 'at risk' of CHD, physicians reported spending an average of 16.5 minutes discussing risk factors and lifestyle changes or treatment that is required. Factors preventing this included insufficient time (42%), having too many other patients to see (27%) and feeling that patients did not listen or understand anyway (21%). CONCLUSIONS: Primary care physicians need more information and support on the implementation of CHD and cholesterol guideline recommendations. This need is recognized by clinicians.
Notes
Comment In: Fam Pract. 2003 Jun;20(3):35012738707
PubMed ID
12429661 View in PubMed
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Access to the world after myocardial infarction: experiences of the recovery process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70416
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2006 Mar-Apr;31(2):63-8; discussion 69
Publication Type
Article
Author
Cathrine Hildingh
Bengt Fridlund
Evy Lidell
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Sweden. hildingh@hos.hh.se
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2006 Mar-Apr;31(2):63-8; discussion 69
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Attitude to Health
Family - psychology
Fear
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Change Events
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Myocardial Infarction - psychology - rehabilitation
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Recovery of Function
Rehabilitation Nursing - organization & administration
Self Care - methods - psychology
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
Myocardial infarction (MI) is a traumatic health event and at the same time a transition of vital importance in human life. The purpose of this study was to elucidate recovery patterns after myocardial infarction with regard to the content of patients' experiences. The study used a descriptive design and a qualitative method. Interviews with 16 men and women were performed, and data were subjected to a thematic content analysis. The recovery process had a pattern of ability, restraints, and reorientation. Through self-help and help from others, the mutual sharing of burdens, and clarifying restraints to recovery, the recovery process progressed toward reorientation. New values and motivation for change, as well as a new balance within the self and relationships were found. The MI had been integrated into life and, through the recovery process, patients' attitudes were better focused, leading to an enhanced quality of life.
PubMed ID
16526524 View in PubMed
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Acting with dedication and expertise: Relatives' experience of nurses' provision of care in a palliative unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276448
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2015 Dec;13(6):1547-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Å. Grøthe
Stian Biong
E K Grov
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2015 Dec;13(6):1547-58
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Death
Family - psychology
Family Relations - psychology
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Neoplasms - complications - psychology
Norway
Nurses - standards
Palliative Care - methods - standards
Qualitative Research
Abstract
Admission of a cancer patient to a palliative unit when near the final stage of their disease trajectory undoubtedly impacts their relatives. The aim of our study was to illuminate and interpret relatives' lived experiences of health personnel's provision of care in a palliative ward.
A phenomenological/hermeneutic approach was employed that was inspired by the philosophical tradition of Heidegger and Ricoeur and further developed by Lindseth and Nordberg. The perspectives of the narrator and the text were interpreted by highlighting relatives' views on a situation in which they have to face existential challenges. The analysis was undertaken in three steps: naïve reading, structural analysis, and comprehensive understanding, including the authors' professional experiences and theoretical background.
Six subthemes appeared: the dying person, the bubble, the sight, the cover, the provision for children's needs, and the availability of immediate help. These components were further constructed into three themes: the meaning of relating, the meaning of action, and the meaning of resources. Our comprehensive understanding of the results suggests that the most important theme is "acting with dedication and expertise."
The following aspects are crucial for relatives of cancer patients hospitalized in a palliative ward: time and existence, family dynamics, and care adjusted to the situation. Our study results led to reflections on the impact of how nurses behave when providing care to patients during the palliative phase, and how they interact with relatives in this situation. We found that cancer patients in a palliative unit most appreciate nurses who act with dedication and expertise.
PubMed ID
24182691 View in PubMed
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Activities of daily living among St Petersburg women after mild stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162564
Source
Occup Ther Int. 2007;14(3):170-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Ann Johansson
Ekaterina Mishina
Andrey Ivanov
Anita Björklund
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, Department of Rehabilitation, Jönköping, Sweden.
Source
Occup Ther Int. 2007;14(3):170-82
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Employment
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Russia
Self Concept
Stroke - physiopathology - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to determine how women living in St Petersburg, Russia, who have had a mild stroke, describe their performance in activities of daily living (ADL) and to elicit possible causes of their occupational dysfunction. Thirty-six women who had experienced a mild stroke and been referred to a rehabilitation centre participated in the study. Data collection was conducted through interviews, including the 'ADL Staircase' and a modified 'Frenchay Activities Index for Stroke Patients'. Additional data were collected through field notes and information from team members and relatives. The results showed that women who have had a mild stroke and ADL limitations experience occupational dysfunction in ADL that is most often caused by a combination of overprotection from relatives, the women's own feelings of anxiety and insecurity, and an overemphasizing of their disability. The results are limited, based on the small sample and restricted geographic area. There is a need to further investigate how individuals who have had a mild stroke can be physically and socially rehabilitated and reintegrated into the community in countries with developing economies such as Russia.
PubMed ID
17621375 View in PubMed
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Actual vs best practice for families post-stroke according to three rehabilitation disciplines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161684
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2007 Sep;39(7):513-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Annie Rochette
Nicol Korner-Bitensky
Johanne Desrosiers
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Quebec, Canada. annie.rochette@umontreal.ca
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2007 Sep;39(7):513-9
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Community Health Services
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physical Therapy Modalities
Questionnaires
Speech Therapy
Spouses - psychology
Stroke - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
To investigate occupational therapists', physiotherapists' and speech language pathologists' family-related rehabilitation practice post-stroke and its association with clinician and environmental variables.
A Canadian cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted on 1755 clinicians. Three case studies describing typical patients after stroke receiving acute care, in-patient rehabilitation, or community rehabilitation, and including specific descriptors regarding family stress and concern, were used to elicit information on patient management.
One-third of the sample identified a family-related problem and offered a related intervention, but only 12/1755 clinicians indicated that they would typically use a standardized assessment of family functioning. Working in the community out-patient setting was associated (OR 9.16), whereas working in a rehabilitation in-patient setting was negatively associated (OR 0.58) with being a problem identifier, the reference group being acute care. Being a PT (OR 0.53) or an SLP (OR 0.49) vs an OT was negatively associated with being a problem identifier, whereas being older (OR 1.02 ) or working in Ontario (OR 1.58) was associated with being a problem identifier. To work in a community out-patient setting (OR 2.43), being older clinicians (OR 1.02) or not perceiving their work environment being supportive of an on-going professional learning (OR 1.72) was associated with being an intervention user,whereas being a PT (OR 0.50) was negatively associated with being a user.
For these 3 disciplines, the prevalence of a family-related focus is low post-stroke. Given the increasing evidence regarding the effectiveness of family-related interventions on stroke outcomes, it is imperative that best practice is implemented.
PubMed ID
17724549 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and analysis of psychometric features of the Caregiver Risk Screen: a tool for detecting the risk of burden in family caregivers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116528
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2013 May;25(5):755-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Silvia Martinez-Rodriguez
Nuria Ortiz-Marqués
Ioseba Iraurgi
María Carrasco
José J Miguel
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain. silvia.martinez@deusto.es
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2013 May;25(5):755-64
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Caregivers - psychology
Cost of Illness
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Family - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - instrumentation
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - psychology
Abstract
There are a limited number of scales available in the Spanish language that can be used to detect burden among individuals who care for a dependent family member. The purpose of this work was to adapt and validate the Caregiver Risk Screen (CRS) scale developed by Guberman et al. (2001) (Guberman, N., Keefe, J., Fancey, P., Nahmiash, D. and Barylak, L. (2001). Development of Screening and Assessment Tools for Family Caregivers: Final Report. Montreal, Canada: Health Transition Fund).
The sample was made up of 302 informal caregivers of dependent family members (average age 57.3 years, and 78.9% were women). Scale structure was subjected to a confirmatory factor analysis. Concurrent and convergent validity were assessed by correlation with validated questionnaires for measuring burden (Zarit Burden Inventory (ZBI)) and psychological health (SCL-90-R).
The results show a high level of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.86), suitable fit of the one-dimensional model tested via confirmatory factor analysis (GFI = 0.91; CFI = 0.91; RMSEA = 0.097), and appropriate convergent validity with similar constructs (r = 0.77 with ZBI; and r-values between 0.45 and 0.63 with SCL-90-R dimensions).
The findings are promising in terms of their adaptation of the CRS to Spanish, and the results enable us to draw the conclusion that the CRS is a suitable tool for assessing and detecting strain in family caregivers. Nevertheless, new research is required that explores all the psychometric features on the scale.
PubMed ID
23388522 View in PubMed
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1350 records – page 1 of 135.