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1340 records – page 1 of 134.

Medical women in academia: silenced by the system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186422
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Mar 4;168(5):542; author reply 544
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-4-2003
Author
Shirley Epstein
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Mar 4;168(5):542; author reply 544
Date
Mar-4-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Physicians, Women - psychology
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2002 Oct 15;167(8):877-912406946
Comment On: CMAJ. 2002 Oct 15;167(8):877-912406946
PubMed ID
12615741 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of family structure to later criminality: a population-based follow-up study of adolescent psychiatric inpatients in Northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122358
Source
Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2013 Apr;44(2):233-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Olli Ikäheimo
Matti Laukkanen
Helinä Hakko
Pirkko Räsänen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2013 Apr;44(2):233-46
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Crime - psychology
Criminals - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Single-Parent Family - psychology
Violence - psychology
Abstract
The influence of family structure on criminality in adolescents is well acknowledged in population based studies of delinquents, but not regarding adolescent psychiatric inpatients. The association of family structure to criminality was examined among 508 adolescents receiving psychiatric inpatient treatment between 2001 and 2006. Family structure and DSM-IV based psychiatric diagnoses were based on the K-SADS-PL-interview and criminality on criminal records provided by the Finnish Legal Register Centre. After adjusting for socio-demographic, clinical and family factors, the adolescents from single parent families, child welfare placements and those not living with their biological parents showed an increased risk of committing crimes at an earlier age than adolescents from two parent families. Lack of a safe and stable family environment has important implications for adolescents with severe mental disorder. When these adolescents are discharged from hospital, special attention should be focused on organizing stable and long term psychosocial support which compensates for the lack of stable family environment and seeks to prevent future adversities.
PubMed ID
22825484 View in PubMed
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[Question from an anonymous general practitioner: When a patient takes his life--who is to share the responsibility with me?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68376
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Feb 23;97(8):876, 879-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-23-2000
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Feb 23;97(8):876, 879-80
Date
Feb-23-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Malpractice
Physician's Role
Physicians, Family - psychology
Suicide
Sweden
PubMed ID
10741038 View in PubMed
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[Organ donation--focus on the relatives].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168432
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Jun 26;168(26-32):2584-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-2006
Author
Anja Marie Jensen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Jun 26;168(26-32):2584-5
Date
Jun-26-2006
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Family - psychology
Humans
Tissue and Organ Procurement - ethics
PubMed ID
16824430 View in PubMed
Less detail

The perspectives of bereaved family members on their experiences of support in palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106532
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2013 Jun;19(6):282-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Tina Lundberg
Mariann Olsson
Carl Johan Fürst
Author Affiliation
Palliative Research Centre, PO Box 11189, SE-100 61 Stockholm, Sweden. tina.lundberg@esh.se
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2013 Jun;19(6):282-8
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bereavement
Family - psychology
Humans
Palliative Care
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
To explore family members' supportive interactions in palliative care and the emotional experiences that they associate with these interactions.
Qualitative individual interviews were performed with bereaved family members recruited from an urban palliative care service in Sweden. The interviews were analysed using inductive qualitative content analysis.
Five categories of supportive interactions with staff members were linked with emotional consequences: informational support, supportive encounters, professional focus of staff, a supportive environment, and bereavement support. Having a dialogue with family members nurtured certainty and security, supportive encounters gave a warm and comforting feeling, and bereavement support contributed to feelings of strength. Environmental factors contributed to dignity.
Supportive interactions with staff and within a home-like environment help to build resilience if tailored to the family member's own needs.
PubMed ID
24151739 View in PubMed
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Lived experiences of nurses as family caregivers in advanced cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125889
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2012;22(1):53-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Lisa Cicchelli
Deborah McLeod
Author Affiliation
IWK Health Centre-Breast Health, Halifax, NS. lisa.cicchelli@iwk.nshealth.ca
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2012;22(1):53-61
Date
2012
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Caregivers - psychology
Family - psychology
Humans
Neoplasms - nursing
Nurses - psychology
Abstract
Research regarding experiences of nurses caring for family members with a cancer diagnosis is limited. To address this gap, a hermeneutic phenomenology approach was used to explore lived experiences of five nurses caring for family members living with advanced cancer. Their experiences were fraught with tensions and conflicts as they balanced the roles of nurse and caregiver. At the heart of their experiences was a sense of being caught in a web of conflicting expectations. Their struggles of expectations stemmed from anticipating the illness trajectory, expectations from family, expectations from other health professionals, and expectations from the nurse caregivers of themselves. Conflict between their professional and personal lives was most challenging. Implications of this care-giving situation are described.
PubMed ID
22443048 View in PubMed
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Living an everyday life through a child's cancer trajectory: families' lived experiences 7 years after diagnosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261653
Source
J Pediatr Oncol Nurs. 2013 Nov-Dec;30(6):293-300
Publication Type
Article
Author
Annelie Johansson Sundler
Inger Hallström
Kina Hammarlund
Maria Björk
Source
J Pediatr Oncol Nurs. 2013 Nov-Dec;30(6):293-300
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Family - psychology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Neoplasms - diagnosis - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to illuminate the lived experiences of families where a child had survived 7 years from a diagnosis of childhood cancer. This article describes one part of an inductive and longitudinal research project that included 17 families. Four families whose child was diagnosed with cancer 7 years previously were interviewed using a hermeneutical phenomenological approach. The families lived experience was described in one essential theme, "Living an everyday life through the child's cancer trajectory," further illuminated in 3 related themes: "Leaving the disease behind yet feeling its presence," "Being the same yet always different," and "Feeling stronger yet vulnerable." The results suggest that family members feel vulnerable even if a long period of time has passed since completion of treatment. To varied degrees they still may need support. When moving forward in life, the family members are helped if they can reconcile their memories and experiences derived from the childhood cancer trajectory.
PubMed ID
24334756 View in PubMed
Less detail

Family dynamics and infant temperament in urban Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59794
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1991;5(4):211-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
M. Tómasdóttir
M E Wilson
M A White
T. Agùstsdóttir
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1991;5(4):211-7
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Iceland
Infant
Pregnancy
Temperament
Abstract
Pregnancy is a time of transition and crisis when many families are challenged with the addition of an infant. Studies of this challenge are unknown for Icelandic families. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of pregnancy and the young infant on family dynamics and the relationship between family dynamics and the infant's developing temperament. Fifty families completed the Family Dynamics Measure during the third trimester of pregnancy and when the infant was eight months old. Mothers also completed the Revised Infant Temperament Questionnaire. Mothers perceived a decrease in role reciprocity across this transition. More stable organized families had more rhythmic infants. There was no association between family structure and either family dynamics or infant temperament. After the birth of the child, fathers perceived more role reciprocity while mothers perceived more individuation and mutuality. Mothers of second infants reported greater individuation than mothers with first infants.
PubMed ID
1767145 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Use of benzodiazepines in hospitals--a frustration for general practitioners].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221871
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jan 10;113(1):66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-1993
Author
T M Halvorsen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jan 10;113(1):66
Date
Jan-10-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benzodiazepines - administration & dosage
Drug Utilization
Hospitalization
Humans
Norway
Physicians, Family - psychology
PubMed ID
8424256 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit: views of family caregivers in chronic illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166792
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2006 Sep;12(9):438-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Allison Williams
Valorie A Crooks
Kelli I Stajduhar
Diane Allan
S Robin Cohen
Author Affiliation
School of Geography and Earth Sciences, McMaster University, Burke Science Building, Room 343, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1. awill@mcmaster.ca
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2006 Sep;12(9):438-45
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Caregivers - psychology
Chronic Disease
Compensation and Redress
Family - psychology
Humans
Abstract
Based on a pilot evaluation of Canada's recently introduced Compassionate Care Benefit (CCB), the purpose of this paper is to highlight the experiences of family caregivers caring for people with non-malignant advanced chronic illness.
Using Patton's (1997) utilization-focused evaluation approach, 25 telephone interviews were conducted with three groups of family caregivers: those who had successfully applied for the CCB; those who were unsuccessful in their applications; those who had never applied for the benefit.
The CCB has a number of limitations, particularly for caregivers of patients diagnosed with non-malignant advanced chronic illness. The central limitations are: difficulties associated with accurate prognostication; limited definition of "family member"; insufficient length of the funding period.
By modelling similar programmes internationally, such as those in Sweden, Norway, and the Netherlands, Canada would likely find the CCB to have greater relevance and accessibility to Canadian caregivers, particularly those caring for people with non-malignant advanced chronic illness.
PubMed ID
17077803 View in PubMed
Less detail

1340 records – page 1 of 134.