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Cultural remains in local and regional context on the central Alaska Peninsula: housepits, language, and cultural affinities at Marraatuq after 1000 B.P.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101947
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2010;47(2):97-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Patricia L McClenahan
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2010;47(2):97-103
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Anthropology, Cultural - education - history
Archaeology - education - history
Continental Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Family - ethnology - history - psychology
Family Health - ethnology
History, 15th Century
History, 16th Century
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
Housing - history
Humans
Language - history
Residence Characteristics - history
Abstract
Professor Dumond's research on the Alaska Peninsula provided information that prior to 1,000 years ago people of both sides of the Alaska Peninsula shared material culture and exhibited subsistence interests that persisted into historic times, During the Late Precontact Era (ca. 1100 A.D. to mid-1700s) these Alutiiq societies shared cultural traits including language, house styles, and material culture with their relatives and neighbors on Kodiak Island. Until recently, few data were available regarding potential variability in house construction techniques, or styles and functions of Alutiiq semi-subterranean houses of this era found on the Alaska Peninsula, This paper provides examples of a few known prehistoric and historic Alaska Peninsula and Kodiak Alutiiq houses and presents previously unreported data from archaeological tests at Marraatuq on the Central Alaska Peninsula, Taken together with Dumond's 1998-1999 field work at Leader Creek and archaeological research on Kodiak Island, the work provides further evidence that interregional interaction was strong during the Late Precontact Era. However, large population centers and ranked political hierarchies probably were not hallmarks of central Alaska Peninsula communities during the Late Precontact Era and historic times as they were on the Kodiak and Aleutian islands.
PubMed ID
21495284 View in PubMed
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Feeding the family during times of stress: experience and determinants of food insecurity in an Inuit community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101710
Source
Geogr J. 2011;177(1):44-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
James D Ford
Maude Beaumier
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Montreal, Quebec.
Source
Geogr J. 2011;177(1):44-61
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Networks - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Family - ethnology - history - psychology
Family Health - ethnology
Food Supply - economics - history
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Nunavut - ethnology
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Starvation - economics - ethnology - history
Stress, Physiological
Stress, Psychological - economics - ethnology - history
Abstract
This paper uses a mixed methods approach to characterise the experience of food insecurity among Inuit community members in Igloolik, Nunavut, and examine the conditions and processes that constrain access, availability, and quality of food. We conducted semi-structured interviews (n= 66) and focus groups (n= 10) with community members, and key informant interviews with local and territorial health professionals and policymakers (n= 19). The study indicates widespread experience of food insecurity. Even individuals and households who were food secure at the time of the research had experienced food insecurity in the recent past, with food insecurity largely transitory in nature. Multiple determinants of food insecurity operating over different spatial-temporal scales are identified, including food affordability and budgeting, food knowledge and preferences, food quality and availability, environmental stress, declining hunting activity, and the cost of harvesting. These determinants are operating in the context of changing livelihoods and climate change, which in many cases are exacerbating food insecurity, although high-order manifestations of food insecurity (that is, starvation) are no longer experienced.
PubMed ID
21560272 View in PubMed
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Help for all parents?: Child-rearing advice in English Canada in the 1960s and 1970s.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129083
Source
Histoire Soc. 2011;44(87):53-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Jessica Haynes
Source
Histoire Soc. 2011;44(87):53-82
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - ethnology
Child
Child Care - economics - history
Child Rearing - ethnology - history - psychology
Child Welfare - economics - ethnology - history - psychology
Child, Preschool
Cultural Diversity
Family - ethnology - history - psychology
Family Characteristics - ethnology - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Parent-Child Relations - ethnology - legislation & jurisprudence
Parenting - ethnology - history - psychology
Social Class - history
Socioeconomic Factors - history
Abstract
Changes occurring in Canadian society during the 1960s and 1970s were poorly reflected in the child-rearing advice directed to English-Canadian parents. Despite the rise in the number of women working outside the home and feminist calls for a more equitable division of child care, experts only sometimes modified their advice to acknowledge this reality. In addition, the creation of the welfare state seemed to encourage child-rearing advisors to ignore class disparities. Finally, experts in this period rarely acknowledged any racial diversity in the Canadian population, despite an increasingly multicultural society. They continued to presume as the norm a white, Anglo-Saxon, middle-class family in which mothers remained the primary caregivers.
PubMed ID
22145176 View in PubMed
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More than a photo: Germans from Russia remember their familial relationships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131539
Source
J Fam Hist. 2011;36(3):333-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Jessica Clark
Author Affiliation
Western Wyoming Community College, Rock Springs.
Source
J Fam Hist. 2011;36(3):333-49
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ethnic Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Family - ethnology - history - psychology
Family Relations - ethnology
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Intergenerational Relations - ethnology
Memory
Midwestern United States - ethnology
Narration - history
Parent-Child Relations - ethnology
Russia - ethnology
Sibling Relations - ethnology
Abstract
Most narrators of the Dakota Memories Oral History Project (DMOHP), the children and grandchildren of ethnic German immigrants from Russia, reminisce a great deal about their family relationships -- grandparent-grandchild relationships, parent-child relationships, and sibling-sibling relationships. They share memories of their grandmothers baking them delicious dough dishes, of their fathers making them labor endlessly in the fields, and of their siblings coaxing them into mischief. Through these relationships, Germans from Russia not only learned about their ethnic group's identity, but they also reshaped it into a new identity, blending their past with their present. Within the context of family relationships, these German Russian descendants forged a new identity rooted in their ethnic heritage and history, but serviceable to new, American-born generations.
PubMed ID
21898966 View in PubMed
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Three thousand families: English Canada's colonizing vision and British family settlement, 1919-39.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138308
Source
J Can Stud. 2011;45(3):5-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Rebecca J Mancuso
Source
J Can Stud. 2011;45(3):5-33
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Emigration and Immigration - history
Family - ethnology - history - psychology
Great Britain - ethnology
History, 20th Century
Humans
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Residence Characteristics - history
Abstract
After the First World War, Canada's immigration policy became more restrictive and immigration more controlled. For English Canadians, immigration of the "right type" of people—those from the British Isles—remained vital to strengthening the nation. This article examines the 3,000 Family Scheme, a joint British-Canadian settlement project in which British families, comprised of over 18,000 individuals, were relocated to homesteads as colonizers of Canada's remote areas. There, many endured isolation and hardship, and were largely blamed for their own plight. A nation-building project that failed, the 3,000 Family Scheme reveals the connections among several enduring national myths in the interwar years: the potential for agricultural expansion, British superiority, and the capabilities of a maturing Canadian state to control the settlement process.
PubMed ID
22413177 View in PubMed
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Wage labor, housing policy, and the nucleation of Inuit households.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176794
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2005;42(2):66-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Pamela Stern
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2005;42(2):66-81
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - ethnology
Employment - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Family Health - ethnology
Government Programs - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Housekeeping - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Housing - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Inuits - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Northwest Territories - ethnology
Nuclear Family - ethnology - history - psychology
Public Policy - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Residence Characteristics - history
Social Support
Abstract
Public policy practices in the Canadian North, particularly those connected to housing and employment, are encouraging a reorganization of Inuit social organization to more closely resemble the insular and independent nuclear family household idealized by Eurocanadians. This has wide-ranging implications for the social stability of northern communities without sufficient employment opportunities. The paper examines the symbolic and structural effects of housing policies and employment on culturally valued social practices such as sharing in Holman, a community in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region of the Northwest Territories of Canada.
PubMed ID
21847838 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.