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The Decomposition of Shared Environmental Influences on Externalizing Syndromes in the Swedish Population: A Multivariate Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289628
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2017 08; 20(4):298-309
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2017
Author
Henrik Ohlsson
Kenneth S Kendler
Paul Lichtenstein
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research,Lund University,Malmö,Sweden.
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2017 08; 20(4):298-309
Date
08-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - genetics
Criminal Behavior
Environment
Family
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Genetic
Registries
Substance-Related Disorders - genetics
Sweden
Syndrome
Abstract
Using information from Swedish population registries, we attempt to decompose the shared environment (C) into four subcomponents: close family, family, household, and community. Among pairs differing in their genetic and geographical/household relationships, we examine three externalizing syndromes: drug abuse (DA), criminal behavior (CB), and alcohol use disorders (AUD). The best-fitting common pathway model suggested that total estimates for C were higher for DA (21% for males and 18% for females) than for AUD (16% and 14%) and CB (17% and 10%). Concerning syndrome-specific influences in males, close family effects were stronger for CB and AUD, while community effects were stronger for DA. The two C components in between community experiences and close family experiences (family and household) were estimated to almost entirely derive from the common latent factor. In females, among the four components of C, the community experiences were just slightly above zero, while the C components referred to as the household effect were almost zero. The total close family experiences were similar and most important across syndromes were also divided into common and specific components. For all syndromes, for both males and females, the effects of additive genetic factors were 2-4 times the size of the total effect of the shared environment. Applying standard methods to novel relationships, we expand our understanding of how the shared environment contributes to individual differences in three externalizing syndromes.
Notes
Cites: Psychol Med. 2015 Aug;45(11):2253-62 PMID 25936380
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2009 Jul;135(4):608-37 PMID 19586164
Cites: Behav Genet. 2016 Mar;46(2):183-92 PMID 26494460
Cites: Psychol Med. 2015 Apr;45(5):1061-72 PMID 25171596
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2014 Feb;171(2):209-17 PMID 24077613
Cites: Psychol Med. 2014 Jul;44(9):1913-25 PMID 24180693
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2015 Aug;50(8):1277-84 PMID 25708193
Cites: Nat Genet. 2012 Feb 19;44(3):247-50 PMID 22344220
Cites: Psychol Med. 2014 Nov;44(15):3181-7 PMID 24766797
Cites: Psychol Med. 2015 Oct;45(13):2897-907 PMID 26040779
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 1992 Feb;101(1):3-17 PMID 1537970
Cites: J Adolesc. 2012 Aug;35(4):823-31 PMID 22240325
Cites: J Subst Abuse. 2001;13(4):391-424 PMID 11775073
Cites: Psychol Sci. 2003 May;14(3):273-7 PMID 12741753
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2014 Apr;55(4):304-12 PMID 24261560
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2003 Apr;160(4):687-95 PMID 12668357
Cites: Psychometrika. 2016 Jun;81(2):535-49 PMID 25622929
Cites: Behav Genet. 2002 May;32(3):221-7 PMID 12141783
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2002 May;128(3):490-529 PMID 12002699
Cites: JAMA Psychiatry. 2015 Mar;72(3):211-8 PMID 25565339
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2012 Jul;69(7):690-7 PMID 22393206
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2013 Nov;48(11):1841-9 PMID 23344783
Cites: Psychol Med. 2000 Mar;30(2):281-94 PMID 10824649
Cites: JAMA Psychiatry. 2013 Feb;70(2):235-42 PMID 23229904
Cites: Psychol Med. 2016 Jun;46(8):1639-50 PMID 26996079
Cites: Nature. 2014 Feb 13;506(7487):185-90 PMID 24463508
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1997 Feb;54(2):178-84 PMID 9040286
Cites: Nature. 2009 Aug 6;460(7256):748-52 PMID 19571811
Cites: Behav Genet. 1994 Jan;24(1):35-49 PMID 8192619
PubMed ID
28578747 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Decomposition of Shared Environmental Influences on Externalizing Syndromes in the Swedish Population: A Multivariate Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289470
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2017 08; 20(4):298-309
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2017
Author
Henrik Ohlsson
Kenneth S Kendler
Paul Lichtenstein
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research,Lund University,Malmö,Sweden.
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2017 08; 20(4):298-309
Date
08-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - genetics
Criminal Behavior
Environment
Family
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Genetic
Registries
Substance-Related Disorders - genetics
Sweden
Syndrome
Abstract
Using information from Swedish population registries, we attempt to decompose the shared environment (C) into four subcomponents: close family, family, household, and community. Among pairs differing in their genetic and geographical/household relationships, we examine three externalizing syndromes: drug abuse (DA), criminal behavior (CB), and alcohol use disorders (AUD). The best-fitting common pathway model suggested that total estimates for C were higher for DA (21% for males and 18% for females) than for AUD (16% and 14%) and CB (17% and 10%). Concerning syndrome-specific influences in males, close family effects were stronger for CB and AUD, while community effects were stronger for DA. The two C components in between community experiences and close family experiences (family and household) were estimated to almost entirely derive from the common latent factor. In females, among the four components of C, the community experiences were just slightly above zero, while the C components referred to as the household effect were almost zero. The total close family experiences were similar and most important across syndromes were also divided into common and specific components. For all syndromes, for both males and females, the effects of additive genetic factors were 2-4 times the size of the total effect of the shared environment. Applying standard methods to novel relationships, we expand our understanding of how the shared environment contributes to individual differences in three externalizing syndromes.
Notes
Cites: Psychol Med. 2015 Aug;45(11):2253-62 PMID 25936380
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2009 Jul;135(4):608-37 PMID 19586164
Cites: Behav Genet. 2016 Mar;46(2):183-92 PMID 26494460
Cites: Psychol Med. 2015 Apr;45(5):1061-72 PMID 25171596
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2014 Feb;171(2):209-17 PMID 24077613
Cites: Psychol Med. 2014 Jul;44(9):1913-25 PMID 24180693
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2015 Aug;50(8):1277-84 PMID 25708193
Cites: Nat Genet. 2012 Feb 19;44(3):247-50 PMID 22344220
Cites: Psychol Med. 2014 Nov;44(15):3181-7 PMID 24766797
Cites: Psychol Med. 2015 Oct;45(13):2897-907 PMID 26040779
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 1992 Feb;101(1):3-17 PMID 1537970
Cites: J Adolesc. 2012 Aug;35(4):823-31 PMID 22240325
Cites: J Subst Abuse. 2001;13(4):391-424 PMID 11775073
Cites: Psychol Sci. 2003 May;14(3):273-7 PMID 12741753
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2014 Apr;55(4):304-12 PMID 24261560
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2003 Apr;160(4):687-95 PMID 12668357
Cites: Psychometrika. 2016 Jun;81(2):535-49 PMID 25622929
Cites: Behav Genet. 2002 May;32(3):221-7 PMID 12141783
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2002 May;128(3):490-529 PMID 12002699
Cites: JAMA Psychiatry. 2015 Mar;72(3):211-8 PMID 25565339
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2012 Jul;69(7):690-7 PMID 22393206
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2013 Nov;48(11):1841-9 PMID 23344783
Cites: Psychol Med. 2000 Mar;30(2):281-94 PMID 10824649
Cites: JAMA Psychiatry. 2013 Feb;70(2):235-42 PMID 23229904
Cites: Psychol Med. 2016 Jun;46(8):1639-50 PMID 26996079
Cites: Nature. 2014 Feb 13;506(7487):185-90 PMID 24463508
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1997 Feb;54(2):178-84 PMID 9040286
Cites: Nature. 2009 Aug 6;460(7256):748-52 PMID 19571811
Cites: Behav Genet. 1994 Jan;24(1):35-49 PMID 8192619
PubMed ID
28578747 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary Vitamin K and Association with Hepatic Vitamin K Status in a Yup'ik Study Population from Southwestern Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296925
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2018 02; 62(3):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
02-2018
Author
Nicholas T Au
Tove Ryman
Allan E Rettie
Scarlett E Hopkins
Bert B Boyer
Jynene Black
Jacques Philip
Joseph Yracheta
Alison E Fohner
Morayma Reyes
Timothy A Thornton
Melissa A Austin
Kenneth E Thummel
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2018 02; 62(3):
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Cytochrome P450 Family 4 - genetics
Diet
Female
Humans
Liver - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Status
Prothrombin - analysis - genetics
Vegetables - chemistry
Vitamin K - administration & dosage
Vitamin K 1 - analysis
Vitamin K 2 - analogs & derivatives - analysis
Abstract
The relationship between dietary vitamin K and plasma PIVKA-II concentration, a biomarker of hepatic vitamin K status, in a Yup'ik study population in southwestern Alaska is investigated.
A total of 659 male and female, self-reported Yup'ik people, =14 years of age, were enrolled. Blood is collected for genotyping and plasma PIVKA-II biomarker analysis. A Yup'ik-specific dietary food frequency questionnaire is used to assess vitamin K intake. Among the participants, 22% report not consuming foods rich in vitamin K during the past year and 36% have a PIVKA-II concentration = 2 ng mL-1 , indicating vitamin K insufficiency. The odds of an elevated PIVKA-II concentration are 33% lower in individuals reporting any versus no consumption of vitamin-K-rich foods. The association is significant after adjusting for CYP4F2*3 genotype. Tundra greens are high in vitamin K1 content, but an exploratory analysis suggests that subsistence meat sources have a greater effect on vitamin K status.
A substantial proportion of the Yup'ik population exhibits vitamin K insufficiency, which is associated with low consumption of vitamin K rich foods and which might affect an individual's response to anticoagulant drugs such as warfarin that target the vitamin K cycle.
PubMed ID
29094808 View in PubMed
Less detail

Familial transmission of externalizing syndromes in extended Swedish families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300397
Source
Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2018 04; 177(3):308-318
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Kenneth S Kendler
Henrik Ohlsson
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia.
Source
Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2018 04; 177(3):308-318
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Criminal Behavior - ethnology
Family
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Male
Registries
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Sweden
Syndrome
Abstract
Risk for criminal behavior (CB), alcohol use disorder (AUD), and drug abuse (DA) are known to be familial. We know less about their transmission across three generations. We examined 844,109 probands born in Sweden 1980-1990, their parents, aunts/uncles, and grandparents for registration in population-based registers for CB, AUD, and DA. Mean tetrachoric relative-proband correlations (95% CIs) were highest for DA (+0.24, 0.24-0.25), followed by CB (+0.23,0.22-0.23) and AUD (+0.17, 0.16-0.17). AUD and CB were relatively stably transmitted across generations, while DA resemblance among relatives was stronger in the younger generations. For all three syndromes, male-male transmission was modestly stronger than female-female. Cross-sex transmission was significantly weaker than same-sex transmission for DA and CB but not AUD. Risk to probands with only an affected grandparent or aunt/uncle were increased 50-60% for CB and AUD, and 70-100% for DA. Parallel figures for affected parents only and parents?+?grandparent or aunt/uncle were 2-3-fold and 4-5-fold for CB and AUD, and 4-5-fold and 6-7-fold for DA. CB, AUD, and DA are all substantially familial in the Swedish population with the transmission across three generations stable for CB and AUD but not DA. Modest quantitative sex effects are seen in the familial transmission of CB, AUD, and DA, and qualitative sex effects for CB and DA. Risk prediction in offspring is orderly with affection status in grandparental and avuncular relationships adding appreciably to that from the parental generation.
PubMed ID
29243876 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Interplay between Genes and Psychosocial Home Environment on Physical Activity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297641
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2018 04; 50(4):691-699
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Date
04-2018
Author
Sari Aaltonen
Jaakko Kaprio
Urho M Kujala
Lea Pulkkinen
Richard J Rose
Karri Silventoinen
Author Affiliation
Institute for Molecular Medicine (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, FINLAND.
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2018 04; 50(4):691-699
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Exercise - psychology
Family Relations
Finland
Gene-Environment Interaction
Humans
Leisure Activities
Longitudinal Studies
Parents
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Genetic factors contribute to individual differences in physical activity, but it remains uncertain whether the magnitude of the genetic effects is modified by variations in home environments. We aimed to examine to what extent the psychosocial home environment in childhood and adolescence modifies the genetic influences on leisure time physical activity in young adulthood.
Participants were Finnish twins (N = 3305) who reported their leisure time physical activity at age 24 yr. The psychosocial home environment was assessed by twins at ages 12, 14, and 17 yr, as well as by their parents when the twins were age 12 yr. Gene-environment interaction modeling was performed with OpenMx software.
Parental ratings of positive home atmosphere as well as the twins' ratings of both positive home atmosphere at age 14 yr and lower relational tensions at ages 12 and 14 yr predicted higher leisure time physical activity levels in young adulthood (regression coefficients = 0.33-0.64). Parental perceptions as well as the twins' perceptions of positive home atmosphere at ages 14 and 17 yr increased the additive genetic variation (moderation effects: 0.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.29-0.80; 0.60, 95% CI = 0.26-1.05; and 0.52, 95% CI = 0.19-0.87, respectively). The twins' ratings of positive home atmosphere at age 12 yr and lower relational tensions at ages 12 and 14 yr increased the unique environmental variation of their subsequent physical activity (moderation effects: 0.46, 95% CI = 0.19-0.60; 0.48, 95% CI = 0.29-0.64; and 0.85, 95% CI = 0.12-0.95, respectively).
A psychosocial home environment that is warm and supportive in childhood and adolescence not only increases the mean level of subsequent leisure time physical activity in young adulthood but also modifies the genetic and environmental variances in leisure time physical activity.
PubMed ID
29194096 View in PubMed
Less detail

The joint impact of cognitive performance in adolescence and familial cognitive aptitude on risk for major psychiatric disorders: a delineation of four potential pathways to illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299231
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 2018 04; 23(4):1076-1083
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
K S Kendler
H Ohlsson
R S E Keefe
K Sundquist
J Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 2018 04; 23(4):1076-1083
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Academic Success
Adolescent
Adult
Aptitude
Child
Cognition - physiology
Cognition Disorders - physiopathology
Family - psychology
Female
Forecasting - methods
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - metabolism - physiopathology
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Siblings - psychology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
How do joint measures of premorbid cognitive ability and familial cognitive aptitude (FCA) reflect risk for a diversity of psychiatric and substance use disorders? To address this question, we examined, using Cox models, the predictive effects of school achievement (SA) measured at age 16 and FCA-assessed from SA in siblings and cousins, and educational attainment in parents-on risk for 12 major psychiatric syndromes in 1?140?608 Swedes born 1972-1990. Four developmental patterns emerged. In the first, risk was predicted jointly by low levels of SA and high levels of FCA-that is a level of SA lower than would be predicted from the FCA. This pattern was strongest in autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia, and weakest in bipolar illness. In these disorders, a pathologic process seems to have caused cognitive functioning to fall substantially short of familial potential. In the second pattern, seen in the internalizing conditions of major depression and anxiety disorders, risk was associated with low SA but was unrelated to FCA. Externalizing disorders-drug abuse and alcohol use disorders-demonstrated the third pattern, in which risk was predicted jointly by low SA and low FCA. The fourth pattern, seen in eating disorders, was directly opposite of that observed in externalizing disorders with risk associated with high SA and high FCA. When measured together, adolescent cognitive ability and FCA identified four developmental patterns leading to diverse psychiatric disorders. The value of cognitive assessments in psychiatric research can be substantially increased by also evaluating familial cognitive potential.
PubMed ID
28416810 View in PubMed
Less detail

Reward sensitivity, impulse control, and social cognition as mediators of the link between childhood family adversity and externalizing behavior in eight countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292207
Source
Dev Psychopathol. 2017 12; 29(5):1675-1688
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Date
12-2017
Author
Jennifer E Lansford
Jennifer Godwin
Marc H Bornstein
Lei Chang
Kirby Deater-Deckard
Laura Di Giunta
Kenneth A Dodge
Patrick S Malone
Paul Oburu
Concetta Pastorelli
Ann T Skinner
Emma Sorbring
Laurence Steinberg
Sombat Tapanya
Liane Peña Alampay
Liliana Maria Uribe Tirado
Suha M Al-Hassan
Dario Bacchini
Author Affiliation
Duke University.
Source
Dev Psychopathol. 2017 12; 29(5):1675-1688
Date
12-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aggression - psychology
Child
Colombia
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Family Relations - psychology
Female
Humans
Italy
Jordan
Kenya
Male
Models, Psychological
Neuropsychological Tests
Parenting - psychology
Philippines
Poverty - psychology
Punishment - psychology
Reward
Social Behavior
Social Perception
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Thailand
United States
Abstract
Using data from 1,177 families in eight countries (Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States), we tested a conceptual model of direct effects of childhood family adversity on subsequent externalizing behaviors as well as indirect effects through psychological mediators. When children were 9 years old, mothers and fathers reported on financial difficulties and their use of corporal punishment, and children reported perceptions of their parents' rejection. When children were 10 years old, they completed a computerized battery of tasks assessing reward sensitivity and impulse control and responded to questions about hypothetical social provocations to assess their hostile attributions and proclivity for aggressive responding. When children were 12 years old, they reported on their externalizing behavior. Multigroup structural equation models revealed that across all eight countries, childhood family adversity had direct effects on externalizing behaviors 3 years later, and childhood family adversity had indirect effects on externalizing behavior through psychological mediators. The findings suggest ways in which family-level adversity poses risk for children's subsequent development of problems at psychological and behavioral levels, situated within diverse cultural contexts.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29162175 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.