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18FDG uptake in brown fat: potential for false positives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77628
Source
Radiol Technol. 2007 May-Jun;78(5):361-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Evans Kevin D
Tulloss Timothy A
Hall Nathan
Author Affiliation
Radiologic Sciences and Therapy, Division of the School of Allied Medical Professions and the Department of Radiology at the Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
Source
Radiol Technol. 2007 May-Jun;78(5):361-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue, Brown - metabolism - radionuclide imaging
Artifacts
False Positive Reactions
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 - diagnostic use - pharmacokinetics
Humans
Neoplasms - metabolism - radionuclide imaging
Radiopharmaceuticals - diagnostic use - pharmacokinetics
Abstract
CONTEXT: (18)FDG is used widely to enhance PET and PET-CT images. However, this radiotracer tends to be taken up by brown fat, which can lead to false-positive diagnoses. Purpose To determine which patients, areas of the body and circumstances are more likely to be associated with false-positive diagnoses due to (18)FDG uptake in brown fat. METHOD: A review of the literature was conducted on factors that contribute to false-positive diagnoses caused by (18)FDG uptake in brown fat. RESULTS: Brown fat commonly is found in women and children and can be located in the supraclavicular, mediastinal, paravertebral and perirenal areas of the body. Research has shown that these areas can be sources of a false-positive diagnosis because of (18)FDG uptake. Studies also have indicated that cold climate affects the uptake of (18)FDG, contributing to false-positive results on PET-CT examinations. CONCLUSIONS: This literature review should stimulate continued research into and awareness of the potential for false-positive PET findings in women and children during the winter months and in cold climates. This information is especially applicable to young female patients undergoing PET or PET-CT.
PubMed ID
17519372 View in PubMed
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Absence of indigenous specific West Nile virus antibodies in Tyrolean blood donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134646
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Jan;31(1):77-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
S T Sonnleitner
J. Simeoni
E. Schmutzhard
M. Niedrig
F. Ploner
H. Schennach
M P Dierich
G. Walder
Author Affiliation
Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, Medical University Innsbruck, Fritz Pregl Straße 1-3/III, Innsbruck, Austria. sissyson@gmx.at
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Jan;31(1):77-81
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Blood Donors
Child, Preschool
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - immunology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Europe
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Neutralization Tests
West Nile Fever - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
West Nile virus - immunology
Abstract
In the last several years, West Nile virus (WNV) was proven to be present especially in the neighboring countries of Austria, such as Italy, Hungary, and the Czech Republic, as well as in eastern parts of Austria, where it was detected in migratory and domestic birds. In summer 2010, infections with WNV were reported from Romania and northern Greece with about 150 diseased and increasingly fatal cases. We tested the sera of 1,607 blood donors from North Tyrol (Austria) and South Tyrol (Italy) for antibodies against WNV by using IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Initial results of the ELISA tests showed seroprevalence rates of 46.2% in North Tyrol and 0.5% in South Tyrol, which turned out to be false-positive cross-reactions with antibodies against tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) by adjacent neutralization assays. These results indicate that seropositivity against WNV requires confirmation by neutralization assays, as cross-reactivity with TBEV is frequent and because, currently, WNV is not endemic in the study area.
PubMed ID
21556676 View in PubMed
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Accuracy and false-positive rate of the cytologic diagnosis of follicular cervicitis: observations from the College of American Pathologists Pap Educational Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112651
Source
Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2013 Jul;137(7):907-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Manon Auger
Walid Khalbuss
Ritu Nayar
Chengquan Zhao
Patricia Wasserman
Rhona Souers
Nicole Thomas
Ann T Moriarty
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, McGill University and McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B4, Canada.
Source
Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2013 Jul;137(7):907-11
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - diagnosis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - diagnosis - epidemiology
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Papanicolaou test
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Societies, Medical
United States - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Uterine Cervicitis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Vaginal Smears - methods - standards
Abstract
Follicular cervicitis is usually easily identifiable on Papanicolaou (Pap) tests; however, historically, follicular cervicitis is reported to lead to false-positive diagnoses of epithelial cell abnormalities.
To assess participant responses in the College of American Pathologists (CAP) Pap educational program (CAP-PAP) to determine the accuracy and false-positive rate of follicular cervicitis cases. Design.-We performed a retrospective review of 4914 participant responses for gynecologic cytology challenges with the reference diagnosis of follicular cervicitis during 11 years (2000-2010) from CAP-PAP. Reference diagnosis category, false-positive rates by participant type (laboratory, cytotechnologist, pathologist), and preparation type (conventional smears, ThinPrep) were analyzed.
Of the total 4914 general category responses, 4368 (88.9%) were benign while 546 (11.1%) responses were epithelial cell abnormalities (false positives). Of benign responses, only 2026 (46.4%) were an exact match to follicular cervicitis. Adenocarcinoma and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion were the most common diagnoses chosen as a false-positive interpretation (42.3% and 20.1%, respectively). Participant type was significantly associated with false-positive interpretations (laboratory: 19.2%; cytotechnologist: 11.1%; pathologist: 7.9%; P
PubMed ID
23808462 View in PubMed
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Accuracy at radiography and probing for the diagnosis of proximal caries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238995
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1985 Apr;93(2):178-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1985
Author
I. Mejàre
H G Gröndahl
K. Carlstedt
A C Grever
E. Ottosson
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1985 Apr;93(2):178-84
Date
Apr-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bicuspid - radiography
Dental Caries - diagnosis - epidemiology - radiography
False Positive Reactions
Humans
Periodontics - instrumentation
Probability
Sweden
Abstract
In 63 teenagers the proximal surfaces of premolars to be extracted for orthodontic reasons and the adjacent surfaces of neighboring teeth, 598 surfaces in all, were examined radiographically and by probing. Direct inspection after extraction revealed that 51% of the surfaces had incipient carious lesions and 5% lesions with cavities. Of the surfaces with cavities 82.1% were correctly diagnosed radiographically if any radiolucency, regardless of its extent, was used as a diagnostic criterion. However, this yielded a false positive rate of 19.6%. If only radiolucencies extending at least into the inner third of the enamel were called positive the true positive rate was 36.7% and the associated false positive rate 1.6%. At a 5% cavity frequency the predictive positive values were 17% and 53%, respectively. Probing yielded a true positive rate of about 29% and a false positive rate of 1.1% with a predictive positive value of 50-57%. All radiolucencies extending into the dentin were associated with cavities. When the most liberal radiographic criterion was used 37.5% of all carious lesions, whether associated with a cavity or not, were detected and 3.8% of sound surfaces were falsely called carious. The corresponding predictive positive value at the actual rate of incipient lesions and lesions with cavities was 92.6%.
PubMed ID
3858967 View in PubMed
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Accuracy in identifying patients with loss of consciousness in a police-operated emergency call centre - first step in the chain of survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163888
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2007 Jul;51(6):742-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
A. Bach
E F Christensen
Author Affiliation
Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Aarhus Traumacentre, Aarhus, Denmark. allanbach@dadlnet.dk
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2007 Jul;51(6):742-6
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Emergencies
False Negative Reactions
False Positive Reactions
Heart Arrest - diagnosis
Humans
Police
Survival Analysis
Survivors
Telephone
Unconsciousness - diagnosis - etiology - mortality
Wakefulness
Abstract
The first link in the 'chain of survival' is the activation of Emergency Medical Services (EMS). In the major part of Denmark, police officers operate the alarm 1-1-2 centre, including calls for EMS. Our aim was to study the police 1-1-2 operators' accuracy in identifying calls concerning patients with loss of consciousness as a key symptom of life-threatening conditions. 'Unconsciousness' was defined as patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of or = 9, 972 of whom were reported 'awake', giving a specificity of 72%. The positive predictive value (percentage of patients found with a GCS score of
PubMed ID
17465976 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of frozen section diagnosis: a retrospective analysis of 4785 cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135291
Source
APMIS. 2011 Apr;119(4-5):259-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Charlotte Winther
Niels Graem
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. charlottewinther@dadlnet.dk
Source
APMIS. 2011 Apr;119(4-5):259-62
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
False Negative Reactions
False Positive Reactions
Female
Frozen Sections - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Intraoperative Period
Male
Pathology Department, Hospital
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
During a 1-year period 4785 intraoperative consultations were performed. The pathology reports were retrospectively reviewed to determine the accuracy of frozen section diagnosis in various tissue types. Skin for evaluation of section margins and axillary sentinel lymph nodes for evaluation of metastatic disease were most frequently sent for frozen section diagnosis. The number of discordant cases were 182, 178 were false negative and four were false positive. When frozen section diagnoses were compared with permanent section diagnoses, the overall diagnostic concordance was 95.1%. The number of deferred specimens was 57. The accuracy of frozen section diagnosis varied between tissue types, and axillary sentinel lymph nodes accounted for the greatest number of discordances. In conclusion, the frozen section diagnosis is a reliable method with varying concordance and deferral rates between tissue types. We suggest regular monitoring of the performance in frozen section diagnosis.
PubMed ID
21492225 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of noninvasive stress myocardial imaging for detecting coronary artery disease in clinical practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143550
Source
Hosp Pract (1995). 2010 Apr;38(2):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Leonard Schwartz
Christopher B Overgaard
Author Affiliation
Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. Dr.Leonard.Schwartz@uhn.on.ca
Source
Hosp Pract (1995). 2010 Apr;38(2):14-8
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Coronary Angiography - standards
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology
Echocardiography - standards
Exercise Test - standards
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods - standards
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Selection
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Distribution
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon - standards
Abstract
There is a wide variation in reported accuracy ofnoninvasive stress myocardial imaging as a screening tool for coronary artery disease (CAD). This study was undertaken to determine its current accuracy in a wide spectrum of patients with chest pain syndromes using invasive coronary angiography as the gold standard.
The patient population consisted of consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography in whom noninvasive stress imaging, either nuclear or echocardiographic, was performed within 6 months prior to the angiogram. The specificity, sensitivity, positive and negative predictive values, and diagnostic accuracy for detecting > or =1 lesions with > or =50% diameter coronary stenosis were determined for each modality.
Of the 227 eligible patients, 141 were men and 86 were women; 70% had significant CAD. The diagnostic accuracy overall was 71% and was no different for nuclear or echocardiographic testing. The positive predictive value (86% vs. 52%; P = 0.002) and diagnostic accuracy (83% vs. 51%; P = 0.002) were better in men than in women.
In this study, noninvasive stress imaging lacked the accuracy of a good screening test for significant CAD. This finding was particularly true for women, for whom it was not much better than a coin toss.
PubMed ID
20469609 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of the Third Molar Eruption Predictor in predicting eruption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194372
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 2001 Jun;91(6):638-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
I. Ventä
S. Schou
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland. irja.venta@helsinki.fi
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 2001 Jun;91(6):638-42
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bayes Theorem
Calibration
Denmark
False Negative Reactions
False Positive Reactions
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting - methods
Humans
Male
Molar - radiography
Molar, Third - physiology - radiography
Observer Variation
Odontometry
Probability
Radiography, Panoramic
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Tooth Crown - radiography
Tooth Eruption
Tooth, Impacted - physiopathology
Tooth, Unerupted - physiopathology - radiography
Abstract
To evaluate the possibility of applying the Third Molar Eruption Predictor to all panoramic radiographs.
Panoramic radiographs were retrospectively analyzed from a 4-year follow-up study of third molars carried out at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. The radiographs, taken at a mean age of 20.6 years, included 45 unerupted or partially erupted mandibular third molars in 28 subjects. Because the device was calibrated both with simple proportions and by use of the methods of Bayes' Decision Theory, the separation point of the device was therefore adjusted at 12 mm from the distal surface of the second molar.
The predictions of future eruption or impaction made with the calibrated device and the actual clinical outcome 4 years later were in conformity for 80% of the mandibular third molars.
The Third Molar Eruption Predictor may be applied to all panoramic radiographs, but it seems to require calibration before use.
PubMed ID
11402274 View in PubMed
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Acute posttraumatic stress: nonacceptance of early intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71884
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2001;62 Suppl 17:35-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
L. Weisaeth
Author Affiliation
Division of Disaster Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Norway. lars.weisath@psykiatri.uio.no
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2001;62 Suppl 17:35-40
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Acute Disease
Adaptation, Psychological
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cooperative Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dreams - psychology
Explosions - statistics & numerical data
False Negative Reactions
False Positive Reactions
Fear - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Mass Screening - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Sleep Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Social Isolation - psychology
Startle Reaction - physiology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Psychological resistance may be of considerable importance in the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) population, considering that researchers in the field of traumatic stress are frequently unsuccessful in achieving high response rates, that many subjects suffering from PTSD never seek help, and that dropouts from therapy are frequent. This article presents data on the main complaints reported in the acute aftermath of an industrial disaster by 246 employees who had been exposed to the disaster. The dominant concerns were symptomatic complaints related to posttraumatic stress reactions rather than external problems. Sleep disturbance, anxiety/fear responses, and physical symptoms were reported by individuals with complaints in the acute phase as most problematic, while irritability and depressive symptoms appeared very infrequently among the reported main complaints. A high specificity and sensitivity were achieved in predicting later PTSD (as defined by DSM-III criteria) by applying early response variables: thus, there were few false-positives and false-negatives. There was a considerable overlap between the PTSD predictors and the main symptom complaints. From a prevention point of view, this should be advantageous, since it would bring the right people to seek help. However, in a significant proportion of the acutely distressed, the reluctance to seek help was motivated by the very symptoms that predicted PTSD. Even a relatively high rate of subjects agreeing to be screened (82.8%) would have lost 42% of those who qualified for a diagnosis of PTSD, and more than half of the subjects with severe outcomes would not have been included. For primary and secondary prevention, the findings suggest that early screening and outreach should be very active.
PubMed ID
11495094 View in PubMed
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Adverse effects of screening for gestational diabetes: a prospective cohort study in Toronto, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209887
Source
J Med Screen. 1997;4(3):128-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
D. Kerbel
R. Glazier
S. Holzapfel
M. Yeung
S. Lofsky
Author Affiliation
Public Health Branch, Ontario Ministry of Health, Canada.
Source
J Med Screen. 1997;4(3):128-32
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - congenital - prevention & control
False Positive Reactions
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Neonatal Screening - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Abstract
To investigate the adverse effects associated with a false positive 50 g glucose challenge test for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).
Consecutive women attending a prenatal registration clinic at a large community hospital in suburban Toronto, Canada.
Prospective cohort study of women between 12 and 24 weeks' gestation with no previous history of diabetes mellitus or GDM. Main outcome measures included anxiety (Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory), depression (Centers for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale), perceived maternal health, and concern about health of the newborn.
Among 2564 eligible subjects, there were 897 subjects with complete data at enrollment and at 32 weeks' gestation, including 88 who had false positive glucose challenge test results. At 32 weeks, only 20% (95% confidence limits 11%, 28%) of women with false positive glucose challenge test results rated their health as excellent, compared with 38% (35%, 42%) of those having negative results and those not tested (P = 0.001). These results were sustained at 36 weeks. There was no association between glucose challenge test result and the change in anxiety (P = 0.57), depression (P = 0.09) or concern about health of the newborn (P = 0.91) between baseline and 32 weeks' gestation, nor were these associations found at 36 weeks.
False positive glucose challenge test results are about six times more likely than true positive results in the general population. Pregnant women with false positive GDM screening results experience a significant decline in their perception of their own health. These adverse effects should be taken into account when deciding about a policy of screening all pregnant women for gestational diabetes.
PubMed ID
9368868 View in PubMed
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289 records – page 1 of 29.