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Aboriginal nursing education in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157124
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
David Gregory
Em M Pijl-Zieber
Jeannette Barsky
Melissa Daniels
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Canada does not have enough aboriginal nurses and aboriginal nursing faculty. Consequently, there is an inadequate number of nurses to meet both on- and off-reserve and community health care staffing needs. In 2002, Health Canada asked the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing to facilitate a national task force that would examine aboriginal nursing in Canada. The task force engaged in an extensive literature review, conducted a national survey of nursing programs, and explored recruitment and retention strategies. In 2007, the association prepared an update on the current status. In this article, the authors review the progress made during the intervening five years in the recruitment, retention and education of aboriginal nursing students.
PubMed ID
18488764 View in PubMed
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Academic dishonesty in nursing schools: an empirical investigation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149336
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2009 Nov;48(11):614-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Donald L McCabe
Author Affiliation
Rutgers Business School, 111 Washington Street, Newark, NJ 07102, USA. dmccabe@andromeda.rutgers.edu
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2009 Nov;48(11):614-23
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Deception
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - ethics - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - ethics - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Plagiarism
Professional Misconduct - ethics - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Schools, Nursing - ethics - organization & administration
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
Academic dishonesty, whether in the form of plagiarism or cheating on tests, has received renewed attention in the past few decades as pervasive use of the Internet and a presumed deterioration of ethics in the current generation of students has led some, perhaps many, to conclude that academic dishonesty is reaching epidemic proportions. What is lacking in many cases, including in the nursing profession, is empirical support of these trends. This article attempts to provide some of that empirical data and supports the conclusion that cheating is a significant issue in all disciplines today, including nursing. Some preliminary policy implications are also considered.
PubMed ID
19650608 View in PubMed
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Affective learning in end-of-life care education: the experience of nurse educators and students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153526
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2008 Dec;14(12):610-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Louise-Andrée Brien
Alain Legault
Nicole Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, Université de Montréal, Quebéc, Canada. louise-andree.brien@umontreal.ca
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2008 Dec;14(12):610-4
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affect
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Competency-Based Education - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Learning
Models, Educational
Models, Nursing
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Problem-Based Learning - organization & administration
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Quebec
Questionnaires
Students, Nursing - psychology
Terminal Care - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
Preparing future nurses to care for dying patients and their families represents a challenge for nursing education. Affective learning, essential to nurture a caring perspective in end-of-life care, can elicit strong emotional reactions in students, to which nurse educators must remain keenly sensitive. This article presents the experience of nurse educators and students with experiential and reflective activities addressing the affective domain of learning, within an intensive 4-week undergraduate course on end-of-life care, developed with a competency-based approach. It stressed the importance of strategic teaching for developing interpersonal competencies in end-of-life care, but revealed difficulties for both nurse educators and students in assessing outcomes derived from affective learning.
PubMed ID
19104478 View in PubMed
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Building community health nursing in the People's Republic of China: a partnership between schools of nursing in Ottawa, Canada, and Tianjin, China.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202181
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1999 Apr;16(2):140-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
N. Edwards
H. Bunn
W C Mei
Z D Hui
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. nedwards@zeus.med.uottawa.ca
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1999 Apr;16(2):140-5
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
China
Clinical Competence - standards
Community Health Nursing - education - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
International Educational Exchange
Job Description
Ontario
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Urban health
Abstract
Community health nursing in China is an emerging specialty. A multi-component collaborative endeavor between the Schools of Nursing of Tianjin Medical University, China, and the University of Ottawa, Canada is described. This project, funded by the Canadian International Development Agency, commenced in 1989. It has laid the groundwork for an expanded role for community health nurses in Tianjin, a municipality of 11 million people located in Northeast China. The historical context for the evolution of community health nursing in China and the emergence of community health nursing as a priority area within the project are described. Major project activities are highlighted, illustrating several underlying principles for strengthening the educational preparation of baccalaureate nurses who can apply community health skills. These include creating a critical mass of faculty who can teach community health nursing, modelling classroom and clinical teaching of community health nursing, bridging the gap between nursing in the community and nursing, in the hospital, and developing a prototype for baccalaureate community health nursing experience. Lessons learned from this initiative are summarized.
PubMed ID
10319665 View in PubMed
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Case seminars open doors to deeper understanding - Nursing students' experiences of learning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146732
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2010 Aug;30(6):533-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Anna Hofsten
Christina Gustafsson
Elisabeth Häggström
Author Affiliation
University of Gävle, SE-801 76 Gävle, Sweden. anna.hofsten@hig.se
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2010 Aug;30(6):533-8
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cooperative Behavior
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - methods
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Learning
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Records
Problem-Based Learning - methods
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Students, Nursing - psychology
Sweden
Teaching - methods
Abstract
The Case Method is a teaching method in which cases from real life inspire students to actively seek knowledge that they discuss in structured seminars. Case seminars in health education have been evaluated, compared and discussed, but descriptions that can help us understand how students learn in the seminars have not previously been published. In a Swedish nursing programme, where case seminars have been used for several years, students were asked to write about their experiences of learning in the seminars. The aim of the present study was to describe this learning process from the students' point of view.
Written data were analysed using content analysis.
A theme concerning how the Case Method opens doors to deeper understanding was identified as a thread running through different codes and categories. Students described the importance of new perspectives and their wish to participate in discussions with other students. The students indicated that the structure, which involved pre-prepared cases and writing on the white board, positioned their own knowledge in a wider context and that the learning atmosphere enabled everyone to participate.
The Case Method seems to involve students in a way that deepens their understanding and critical thinking.
PubMed ID
20005608 View in PubMed
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CĂ©leste Johnston: at the forefront of pain research. Interview by Patrick McCloskey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157911
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Mar;104(3):34-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008

Clinical nurse educators as agents for change: increasing research utilization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172525
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2005 Nov;42(8):899-914
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
F Margaret Milner
C A Estabrooks
C. Humphrey
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Faculty of Nursing, 3rd floor, Clinical Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G3. margaret.milner@ualberta.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2005 Nov;42(8):899-914
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Benchmarking
Clinical Competence
Diffusion of Innovation
Evidence-Based Medicine - education - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Information Dissemination
Linear Models
Mass Media
Mentors
Models, Psychological
Nurse Administrators - education - organization & administration - psychology
Nurse Clinicians - education - organization & administration - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Research - education - organization & administration
Nursing Staff - education - organization & administration - psychology
Organizational Innovation
Self Concept
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the determinants of research utilization among clinical nurse educators. The primary goal for clinical nurse educators is the facilitation of professional development of practicing nurses. Responsibilities include promoting best practice by mentoring others, acting as an information source, and assisting in the development of policies and procedures based on available research evidence. Using Rogers' (Diffusion of Innovations, 4th edn., The Free Press, New York) diffusion of innovations theory as a theoretical foundation, we conducted a secondary analysis to test a predictive model of research utilization using linear regression. Results show that educators report significantly higher research use than staff nurses and managers. Predictors of research utilization include attitude toward research, awareness of information based on research, and involvement in research activities. Localite communication predicted conceptual research use and mass media predicted symbolic use, lending support to the idea that overall, instrumental, conceptual, and symbolic research utilization are conceptually different from one another. Our findings show that the research utilization behaviors of clinical nurse educators position them to facilitate evidence-based nursing practice in organizations. We discuss the theoretical, conceptual, and nursing role implications of our findings for nursing practice, education, and research. Suggestions for future research includes studying actual use of research findings of clinical nurse educators and designing intervention studies that assesses the effectiveness of clinical nurse educators as facilitators of research utilization in organizations.
PubMed ID
16210028 View in PubMed
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Commendations, conversations, and life-changing realizations: teaching and practicing family nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144672
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2010 May;16(2):146-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Nancy J Moules
Hillary Johnstone
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. njmoules@ucalgary.ca
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2010 May;16(2):146-60
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Alberta
Attitude of Health Personnel
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Empathy
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Family Nursing - organization & administration
Grief
Humans
Morale
Narration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Theory
Philosophy, Nursing
Professional-Family Relations
Students, Nursing - psychology
Teaching - organization & administration
Terminal Care - psychology
Abstract
This article embeds a piece of reflective writing and analysis from an undergraduate nursing student about the integration of course content to practice in the nursing of families. Surrounding the reflection of the student, the course professor discusses the content, intent, history, and delivery of the family nursing course and examines how the theory taught is necessarily mirrored in the way it is taught and the ways that students are invited into experiencing and "practicing" the skills, philosophies, theories, and beliefs of nursing families well.
PubMed ID
20335497 View in PubMed
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64 records – page 1 of 7.