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5-years later - have faculty integrated medical genetics into nurse practitioner curriculum?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106400
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2013;10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Ann H Maradiegue
Quannetta T Edwards
Diane Seibert
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2013;10
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advanced Practice Nursing - education
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Faculty, Nursing
Genetics, Medical - education
Humans
Molecular Medicine - education
Questionnaires
Schools, Nursing
United States
Abstract
Abstract Many genetic/genomic educational opportunities are available to assist nursing faculty in their knowledge and understanding of genetic/genomics. This study was conducted to assess advance practice nursing faculty members' current knowledge of medical genetics/genomics, their integration of genetics/genomics content into advance practice nursing curricula, any prior formal training/education in genetics/genomics, and their comfort level in teaching genetics/genomic content. A secondary aim was to conduct a comparative analysis of the 2010 data to a previous study conducted in 2005, to determine changes that have taken place during that time period. During a national nurse practitioner faculty conference, 85 nurse practitioner faculty voluntarily completed surveys. Approximately 70% of the 2010 faculty felt comfortable teaching basic genetic/genomic concepts compared to 50% in 2005. However, there continue to be education gaps in the genetic/genomic content taught to advance practice nursing students. If nurses are going to be a crucial member of the health-care team, they must achieve the requisite competencies to deliver the increasingly complex care patients require.
Notes
Erratum In: Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2013;10: doi/10.1515/ijnes-2013-0094
PubMed ID
24176964 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal nursing education in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157124
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
David Gregory
Em M Pijl-Zieber
Jeannette Barsky
Melissa Daniels
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Canada does not have enough aboriginal nurses and aboriginal nursing faculty. Consequently, there is an inadequate number of nurses to meet both on- and off-reserve and community health care staffing needs. In 2002, Health Canada asked the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing to facilitate a national task force that would examine aboriginal nursing in Canada. The task force engaged in an extensive literature review, conducted a national survey of nursing programs, and explored recruitment and retention strategies. In 2007, the association prepared an update on the current status. In this article, the authors review the progress made during the intervening five years in the recruitment, retention and education of aboriginal nursing students.
PubMed ID
18488764 View in PubMed
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Academic dishonesty in nursing schools: an empirical investigation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149336
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2009 Nov;48(11):614-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Donald L McCabe
Author Affiliation
Rutgers Business School, 111 Washington Street, Newark, NJ 07102, USA. dmccabe@andromeda.rutgers.edu
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2009 Nov;48(11):614-23
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Deception
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - ethics - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - ethics - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Plagiarism
Professional Misconduct - ethics - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Schools, Nursing - ethics - organization & administration
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
Academic dishonesty, whether in the form of plagiarism or cheating on tests, has received renewed attention in the past few decades as pervasive use of the Internet and a presumed deterioration of ethics in the current generation of students has led some, perhaps many, to conclude that academic dishonesty is reaching epidemic proportions. What is lacking in many cases, including in the nursing profession, is empirical support of these trends. This article attempts to provide some of that empirical data and supports the conclusion that cheating is a significant issue in all disciplines today, including nursing. Some preliminary policy implications are also considered.
PubMed ID
19650608 View in PubMed
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Affective learning in end-of-life care education: the experience of nurse educators and students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153526
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2008 Dec;14(12):610-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Louise-Andrée Brien
Alain Legault
Nicole Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, Université de Montréal, Quebéc, Canada. louise-andree.brien@umontreal.ca
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2008 Dec;14(12):610-4
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affect
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Competency-Based Education - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Learning
Models, Educational
Models, Nursing
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Problem-Based Learning - organization & administration
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Quebec
Questionnaires
Students, Nursing - psychology
Terminal Care - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
Preparing future nurses to care for dying patients and their families represents a challenge for nursing education. Affective learning, essential to nurture a caring perspective in end-of-life care, can elicit strong emotional reactions in students, to which nurse educators must remain keenly sensitive. This article presents the experience of nurse educators and students with experiential and reflective activities addressing the affective domain of learning, within an intensive 4-week undergraduate course on end-of-life care, developed with a competency-based approach. It stressed the importance of strategic teaching for developing interpersonal competencies in end-of-life care, but revealed difficulties for both nurse educators and students in assessing outcomes derived from affective learning.
PubMed ID
19104478 View in PubMed
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[A measure of professors' attitudes towards the creativity of student nurses].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227538
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 1991;23(1):41-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
D. Gravelle
H. Lazure
M. Reidy
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 1991;23(1):41-55
Date
1991
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Creativity
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Faculty, Nursing
Humans
Problem Solving
Quebec
Questionnaires - standards
Students, Nursing
Abstract
Creativity and problem solving are closely related in the learning and practice of nursing. The problem underlying this study concerns the attitudes of professors of nursing in 321 French language community colleges in Quebec toward the creative characteristics of their students. However, given the absence of a valid and reliable French instrument, this study focused on the validation of a French version of Torrance's Ideal Pupil Checklist. Content, construct and criteria validity were all verified, as well as the stability and homogeneity aspects of reliability.
PubMed ID
1802366 View in PubMed
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Andragogy as a didactic perspective in the attitudes of nurse instructors in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225958
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 1991 Aug;11(4):278-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1991
Author
S. Janhonen
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 1991 Aug;11(4):278-83
Date
Aug-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Education, Nursing - organization & administration - standards
Faculty, Nursing - standards
Finland
Humans
Learning
Nursing Education Research
Organizational Objectives
Questionnaires
Role
Abstract
In this article the didactic perspectives of nurse instructors (NIs) is examined with the help of andragogy defined by the concepts of self-directed learning, learning as a process and lifelong learning. The results of a pilot study of ongoing research on the educational perspective of NIs, are used as examples to discuss how far NIs have accepted the features of andragogy as their didactic perspective both in their public stance and in their actions as described by NIs themselves.
PubMed ID
1881376 View in PubMed
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238 records – page 1 of 24.