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19 records – page 1 of 2.

[At what age does cognitive decline begin? Sir William Osler, 1849-1919].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119742
Source
Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi. 2012 Jan-Mar;116(1):11-4
Publication Type
Article

[Experience of teaching industrial medicine in post-graduate professional training sysem (to 15th jubilee of Industrial Medicine Department Foundation in Postgraduate Training Faculty of Moscow Sechenov Medical Academy)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150966
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2009;(3):40-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009

The first pneumonectomies for lung cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157629
Source
J Perioper Pract. 2008 Mar;18(3):130-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Harold Ellis
Author Affiliation
University of London.
Source
J Perioper Pract. 2008 Mar;18(3):130-1
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Faculty, Medical - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - history
Medical Staff, Hospital - history
Pneumonectomy - history
United States
Abstract
The year 1933 was remarkable in the history of lung surgery in that five surgeons, in five separate medical centres in the USA and Canada, performed the first, and successful, pneumonectomies for tumours of the lung.
PubMed ID
18426132 View in PubMed
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Source
J Neurol. 2011 Apr;258(4):706-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Gunnar Grant
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. gunnar.grant@ki.se
Source
J Neurol. 2011 Apr;258(4):706-7
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Faculty, Medical - history
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Nervous System - anatomy & histology - pathology
Pathology - history
Sweden
PubMed ID
21052707 View in PubMed
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Lister and Osler: comparisons, contrasts, and connections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183079
Source
J Am Coll Surg. 2003 Nov;197(5):838-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Joseph B VanderVeer
Author Affiliation
College of Physicians of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
Source
J Am Coll Surg. 2003 Nov;197(5):838-45
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Experimentation - history
Animals
Antisepsis - history
Canada
Christianity - history
England
Faculty, Medical - history
General Surgery - history
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Microscopy - history
PubMed ID
14585422 View in PubMed
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[Olaus Rudbeck as scientist and professor of medicine]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29601
Source
Sven Med Tidskr. 2004;8(1):39-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Gunnar Eriksson
Source
Sven Med Tidskr. 2004;8(1):39-44
Date
2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anatomy - history
Animals
Archaeology - history
Blood Circulation
Botany - history
English Abstract
Faculty, Medical - history
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
Humans
Sweden
Abstract
Olaus Rudbeck (1630-1702) was one of the pioneers in the study of lymphatic vessels. As a young student at Uppsala University he began dissecting small animals with great diligence and found the lymphatic connection between the intestines and the circulating blood, leading the prepared nutrients via the thoracic duct to the veins. By applying ligatures to the lymphatic vessels he could observe the direction of the flow. His observations confirmed William Harvey's newly advanced theory about the circulation of the blood and were in agreement with the then modern mechanistic view of body functions. Rudbeck demonstrated his findings for Queen Christina in the spring of 1652 and received from her money for a visit to the University of Leiden, Holland in the autumn of 1653. He had just before his departure published his own discoveries, but the Danish anatomist Thomas Bartholin had reported very similar results slightly before. During his stay in Holland (autumn 1653-summer 1654) where he was admired for his anatomical skillfullness, a priority dispute began between him and one of Bartholin's students, lasting for years. Back in Uppsala Rudbeck began and extensive activity, including the foundations of the botanical garden, the anatomical theatre and other university buildings. He became a professor of medicine in 1660 but soon left his anatomical studies for work in several disciplines and trades. He was a prominent master-builder and garden architect as well as an astronomer, botanist, musician and archaeologist. In the last mentioned capacity he published his ill-famed Atlantica, a gigantic reconstruction of the history of old Sweden from the times of the Flood, through the era of vast conquests including Russia and the Mediterranean region, supposed to have take place in the third and second millenium B.C. Rudbeck mingled philogical methods and mythological explanations with excavations and natural history to reach his phantastic conclusions. At the same time the Atlantica (in three volumes plus one unfinished) is a very personal document, demonstrating i.a. that he had a medical practices, including advanced anatomical surgery, as when helping at the birth of one of his children. The boy was christened "Johannes Caesar" in commemoration of the event, but apparently it was not a regular Caeserian section.
PubMed ID
16025602 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.