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5-years later - have faculty integrated medical genetics into nurse practitioner curriculum?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106400
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2013;10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Ann H Maradiegue
Quannetta T Edwards
Diane Seibert
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2013;10
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advanced Practice Nursing - education
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Faculty, Nursing
Genetics, Medical - education
Humans
Molecular Medicine - education
Questionnaires
Schools, Nursing
United States
Abstract
Abstract Many genetic/genomic educational opportunities are available to assist nursing faculty in their knowledge and understanding of genetic/genomics. This study was conducted to assess advance practice nursing faculty members' current knowledge of medical genetics/genomics, their integration of genetics/genomics content into advance practice nursing curricula, any prior formal training/education in genetics/genomics, and their comfort level in teaching genetics/genomic content. A secondary aim was to conduct a comparative analysis of the 2010 data to a previous study conducted in 2005, to determine changes that have taken place during that time period. During a national nurse practitioner faculty conference, 85 nurse practitioner faculty voluntarily completed surveys. Approximately 70% of the 2010 faculty felt comfortable teaching basic genetic/genomic concepts compared to 50% in 2005. However, there continue to be education gaps in the genetic/genomic content taught to advance practice nursing students. If nurses are going to be a crucial member of the health-care team, they must achieve the requisite competencies to deliver the increasingly complex care patients require.
Notes
Erratum In: Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2013;10: doi/10.1515/ijnes-2013-0094
PubMed ID
24176964 View in PubMed
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25-year analysis of a dental undergraduate research training program (BSc Dent) at the University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154080
Source
J Dent Res. 2008 Dec;87(12):1085-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
J E Scott
J. de Vries
A M Iacopino
Author Affiliation
Oral Biology, University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
J Dent Res. 2008 Dec;87(12):1085-8
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aptitude Tests
Career Choice
Cohort Studies
Curriculum
Decision Making
Dental Research - education - trends
Education, Dental - trends
Education, Dental, Graduate - trends
Educational Measurement
Evidence-Based Dentistry - education
Faculty, Dental
Humans
Manitoba
Program Development
Schools, Dental - trends
Students, Dental
Abstract
Research in the context of the dental school has traditionally been focused on institutional/faculty accomplishments and generating new knowledge to benefit the profession. Only recently have significant efforts been made to expand the overall research programming into the formal dental curriculum, to provide students with a baseline exposure to the research and critical thinking processes, encourage evidence-based decision-making, and stimulate interest in academic/research careers. Various approaches to curriculum reform and the establishment of multiple levels of student research opportunities are now part of the educational fabric of many dental schools worldwide. Many of the preliminary reports regarding the success and vitality of these programs have used outcomes measures and metrics that emphasize cultural changes within institutions, student research productivity, and student career preferences after graduation. However, there have not been any reports from long-standing programs (a minimum of 25 years of cumulative data) that describe dental school graduates who have had the benefit of research/training experiences during their dental education. The University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry initiated a BSc Dent program in 1980 that awarded a formal degree for significant research experiences taking place within the laboratories of the Faculty-based researchers and has continued to develop and expand this program. The success of the program has been demonstrated by the continued and increasing demands for entry, the academic achievements of the graduates, and the numbers of graduates who have completed advanced education/training programs or returned to the Faculty as instructors. Analysis of our long-term data validates many recent hypotheses and short-term observations regarding the benefits of dental student research programs. This information may be useful in the design and implementation of dental student research programs at other dental schools.
PubMed ID
19029073 View in PubMed
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AAA releases results of first anatomy salary/faculty survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182749
Source
Anat Rec B New Anat. 2003 Dec;275(1):181
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003

Aboriginal nursing education in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157124
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
David Gregory
Em M Pijl-Zieber
Jeannette Barsky
Melissa Daniels
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Canada does not have enough aboriginal nurses and aboriginal nursing faculty. Consequently, there is an inadequate number of nurses to meet both on- and off-reserve and community health care staffing needs. In 2002, Health Canada asked the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing to facilitate a national task force that would examine aboriginal nursing in Canada. The task force engaged in an extensive literature review, conducted a national survey of nursing programs, and explored recruitment and retention strategies. In 2007, the association prepared an update on the current status. In this article, the authors review the progress made during the intervening five years in the recruitment, retention and education of aboriginal nursing students.
PubMed ID
18488764 View in PubMed
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"A bumpy road": Kindergarten staff's experiences with an intervention to promote healthy diets in toddlers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301624
Source
Appetite. 2018 08 01; 127:37-43
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-01-2018
Author
Berit Johannessen
Sissel H Helland
Elling Bere
Nina Cecilie Øverby
Liv Fegran
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Nursing Sciences, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, PO Box 422, 4604 Kristiansand, Norway. Electronic address: berit.johannessen@uia.no.
Source
Appetite. 2018 08 01; 127:37-43
Date
08-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Cooking
Faculty
Feeding Behavior
Food Preferences
Health promotion
Healthy Diet
Humans
Norway
Schools
Abstract
This study explores the experiences of kindergarten staff with a multi-component kindergarten-based intervention, the aims of which were to reduce levels of food neophobia and to promote healthy diets in toddlers (aged 2-3 years). A qualitative design was chosen for the study, and the data are based on three focus group interviews. Altogether, 15 kindergarten staff were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. The focus group interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Five main themes emerged from the interviews: i) Successful development of sensory knowledge, ii) Food neophobia, iii) Implementing new routines, a challenge for some, iv) Lack of cooking skills, and v) Inspired to continue. A main finding was that all kindergarten staff perceived the sensory education sessions as successful and reported that both toddlers and staff expanded their food vocabulary and increased their attention to sensory impressions of food. However, the staff reported that some toddlers were less willing to taste new lunch dishes than to taste new foods in the sensory education sessions. The staff also noted that the guidelines for feeding practices resulted in unfamiliar situations at the lunch table. The staff agreed that cooking novel foods was time consuming and left less time for other tasks. Finally, all kindergarten staff expressed that they would like to continue with portions of the food intervention. Our main interpretation is that the intervention presented several challenges, especially regarding cooking and feeding practices. If kindergartens are to be a place to promote healthy eating habits in the early years, sufficient time and resources for cooking seem to be needed and food and feeding practices included in the curriculum of kindergartens and higher education for kindergarten teachers.
ISRCTN74823448.
PubMed ID
29704540 View in PubMed
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Academic careers in medical education: perceptions of the effects of a faculty development program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200453
Source
Acad Med. 1999 Oct;74(10 Suppl):S72-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999

Academic dishonesty in nursing schools: an empirical investigation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149336
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2009 Nov;48(11):614-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Donald L McCabe
Author Affiliation
Rutgers Business School, 111 Washington Street, Newark, NJ 07102, USA. dmccabe@andromeda.rutgers.edu
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2009 Nov;48(11):614-23
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Deception
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - ethics - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - ethics - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Plagiarism
Professional Misconduct - ethics - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Schools, Nursing - ethics - organization & administration
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
Academic dishonesty, whether in the form of plagiarism or cheating on tests, has received renewed attention in the past few decades as pervasive use of the Internet and a presumed deterioration of ethics in the current generation of students has led some, perhaps many, to conclude that academic dishonesty is reaching epidemic proportions. What is lacking in many cases, including in the nursing profession, is empirical support of these trends. This article attempts to provide some of that empirical data and supports the conclusion that cheating is a significant issue in all disciplines today, including nursing. Some preliminary policy implications are also considered.
PubMed ID
19650608 View in PubMed
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Academic family physicians' perception of genetic testing and integration into practice: a CERA study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115009
Source
Fam Med. 2013 Apr;45(4):257-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Arch G Mainous
Sharleen P Johnson
Svetlana Chirina
Richard Baker
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA. mainouag@musc.edu
Source
Fam Med. 2013 Apr;45(4):257-62
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Faculty, Medical
Family Practice - education - methods
Female
Genetic Testing - methods
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Middle Aged
Self Report
United States
Abstract
Genetic testing for a variety of diseases is becoming more available to primary care physicians, but it is unclear how useful physicians perceive these tests to be. We examined academic family physicians' perception of and experiences with clinical genetic testing and direct-to-consumer genetic testing.
This study is an analysis of a survey conducted as part of the Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA). Academic family physicians in the United States and Canada were queried about their perception of genetic testing's utility, how frequently patients ask about genetic testing, and the importance of genetic testing in future practice and education of students and residents.
The overall survey had a response rate of 45.1% (1,404/3,112). A majority (54.4%) of respondents felt that they were not knowledgeable about available genetic tests. Respondents perceived greater utility of genetic tests for breast cancer (94.9%) and hemochromatosis (74.9%) than for Alzheimer's disease (30.3%), heart disease (25.4%), or diabetes (25.2%). Individuals with greater self-perceived knowledge of genetic tests were more likely to feel that genetic testing would have a significant impact on their future practice (23.1%) than those with less knowledge (13.4%). Respondents had little exposure to direct-to-consumer genetic tests, but a majority felt that they were more likely to cause harm than benefit.
Academic family physicians acknowledge their lack of knowledge about genetic tests. Educational initiatives may be useful in helping them incorporate genetic testing into practice and in teaching these skills to medical students and residents.
PubMed ID
23553089 View in PubMed
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The activities and responsibilities of the vice chair for education in U.S. and Canadian departments of medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123194
Source
Acad Med. 2012 Aug;87(8):1041-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Erica Brownfield
Benjamin Clyburn
Sally Santen
Gustavo Heudebert
Paul A Hemmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. ebrownf@emory.edu
Source
Acad Med. 2012 Aug;87(8):1041-5
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - organization & administration
Canada
Education, Medical
Faculty, Medical
Female
Humans
Job Description
Leadership
Male
Organizational Objectives
Physician Executives
Questionnaires
United States
Abstract
A profile of the activities and responsibilities of vice chairs for education is notably absent from the medical education literature. The authors sought to determine the demographics, roles and responsibilities, and major priorities and challenges faced by vice chairs for education.
In 2010, the authors sent a confidential, Web-based survey to all 82 identified department of medicine vice chairs for education in the United States and Canada. The authors inquired about demographics, roles, expectations of and for their position, opinions on the responsibilities outlined for their position, metrics used to evaluate their success, top priorities, and job descriptions. Analysis included creating descriptive statistics and categorizing the qualitative comments.
Fifty-nine vice chairs for education (72%) responded. At the time of appointment, only 6 (10%) were given a job description, and only 17 (28%) had a defined job description and metrics used to evaluate their success. Only 20 (33%) had any formal budget management training, and 23 (38%) controlled an education budget. Five themes emerged regarding the responsibilities and goals of the vice chair for education: oversee educational programs; possess educational expertise; promote educational scholarship; serve in leadership activities; and, disturbingly, respondents found expectations to be vague and ill defined.
Vice chairs for education are departmental leaders. The authors' findings and recommendations can serve as a beginning for defining educational directions and resources, building consensus, and designing an appropriate educational infrastructure for departments of medicine.
Notes
Comment In: Acad Med. 2012 Aug;87(8):999-100122827983
PubMed ID
22722351 View in PubMed
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816 records – page 1 of 82.