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The 2 Ã? 2 model of perfectionism: a comparison across Asian Canadians and European Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123132
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):567-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Véronique Franche
Patrick Gaudreau
Dave Miranda
Author Affiliation
School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Jacques Lussier, ON, Canada. vfran053@uottawa.ca
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):567-74
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Educational Status
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Personal Satisfaction
Personality
Students - psychology
Abstract
The 2 Ã? 2 model of perfectionism posits that the 4 within-person combinations of self-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism (i.e., pure SOP, mixed perfectionism, pure SPP, and nonperfectionism) can be distinctively associated with psychological adjustment. This study examined whether the relationship between the 4 subtypes of perfectionism proposed in the 2 Ã? 2 model (Gaudreau & Thompson, 2010) and academic outcomes (i.e., academic satisfaction and grade-point average [GPA]) differed across 2 sociocultural groups: Asian Canadians and European Canadians. A sample of 697 undergraduate students (23% Asian Canadians) completed self-report measures of dispositional perfectionism, academic satisfaction, and GPA. Results replicated most of the 2 Ã? 2 model's hypotheses on ratings of GPA, thus supporting that nonperfectionism was associated with lower GPA than pure SOP (Hypothesis 1a) but with higher GPA than pure SPP (Hypothesis 2). Results also showed that mixed perfectionism was related to higher GPA than pure SPP (Hypothesis 3) but to similar levels as pure SOP, thus disproving Hypothesis 4. Furthermore, results provided evidence for cross-cultural differences in academic satisfaction. While all 4 hypotheses were supported among European Canadians, only Hypotheses 1a and 3 were supported among Asian Canadians. Future lines of research are discussed in light of the importance of acknowledging the role of culture when studying the influence of dispositional perfectionism on academic outcomes.
PubMed ID
22731112 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and analysis of psychometric features of the Caregiver Risk Screen: a tool for detecting the risk of burden in family caregivers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116528
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2013 May;25(5):755-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Silvia Martinez-Rodriguez
Nuria Ortiz-Marqués
Ioseba Iraurgi
María Carrasco
José J Miguel
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain. silvia.martinez@deusto.es
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2013 May;25(5):755-64
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Caregivers - psychology
Cost of Illness
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Family - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - instrumentation
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - psychology
Abstract
There are a limited number of scales available in the Spanish language that can be used to detect burden among individuals who care for a dependent family member. The purpose of this work was to adapt and validate the Caregiver Risk Screen (CRS) scale developed by Guberman et al. (2001) (Guberman, N., Keefe, J., Fancey, P., Nahmiash, D. and Barylak, L. (2001). Development of Screening and Assessment Tools for Family Caregivers: Final Report. Montreal, Canada: Health Transition Fund).
The sample was made up of 302 informal caregivers of dependent family members (average age 57.3 years, and 78.9% were women). Scale structure was subjected to a confirmatory factor analysis. Concurrent and convergent validity were assessed by correlation with validated questionnaires for measuring burden (Zarit Burden Inventory (ZBI)) and psychological health (SCL-90-R).
The results show a high level of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.86), suitable fit of the one-dimensional model tested via confirmatory factor analysis (GFI = 0.91; CFI = 0.91; RMSEA = 0.097), and appropriate convergent validity with similar constructs (r = 0.77 with ZBI; and r-values between 0.45 and 0.63 with SCL-90-R dimensions).
The findings are promising in terms of their adaptation of the CRS to Spanish, and the results enable us to draw the conclusion that the CRS is a suitable tool for assessing and detecting strain in family caregivers. Nevertheless, new research is required that explores all the psychometric features on the scale.
PubMed ID
23388522 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of the Good Nursing Care Scale for Patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71271
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Sep;17(3):308-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Lisbeth Rehnström
Lennart Christensson
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Mitra Unosson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Care, Division of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Sep;17(3):308-14
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Care - psychology - standards
Nursing Evaluation Research - methods - standards
Patient satisfaction
Perioperative Nursing - standards
Psychometrics
Quality of Health Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Surgical Procedures, Operative - nursing - psychology
Sweden
Translating
Abstract
The aim of this study was to adapt the instrument 'Good Nursing Care Scale for Patients' to Swedish conditions as a measure of patients' satisfaction, as well as estimating its reliability and validity. Following a pilot test, discussions in the author group, testing for readability among patients and judgement of content validity by a panel of experts, the final version was reduced to 72 items focusing on good caring. The refined instrument was assessed for internal consistency in 447 surgical in-patients, for 2 week test-retest reliability in 100 patients and subjected to orthogonal principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation, followed by second-order factor analysis. The internal consistency item-item correlation coefficient ranged from 0.15 to 0.91, correlation between each item and the total scale was >or=0.30 for 70 items, Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the final scale was 0.79 and test-retest reliability was 0.75. An orthogonal principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation was conducted on the final 71 items and the 15 first-order factors with eigenvalues >or=1 explained 66% of the total variance. A second-order factor analysis of these 15 factors as items resulted in a seven-factor solution. The total variance explained by the seven factors was 79%. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the seven factors ranged between 0.32 and 0.95. The instrument seems reliable and valid to assess the patients' satisfaction with what happened during their hospital stay. To confirm the factor structure and improve factor consistency additional development and testing is suggested.
PubMed ID
12919467 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and reliability of the Readiness for Inter professional Learning Scale in a Danish student and health professional setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278118
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2016 Feb 16;16:60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-2016
Author
Birgitte Nørgaard
Eva Draborg
Jan Sørensen
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2016 Feb 16;16:60
Date
Feb-16-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Denmark
Educational Measurement - methods
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health Occupations - education - standards
Humans
Interdisciplinary Studies - standards - trends
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - standards
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Students, Health Occupations - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Translations
Young Adult
Abstract
Shared learning activities aim to enhance the collaborative skills of health students and professionals in relation to both colleagues and patients. The Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale is used to assess such skills. The aim of this study was to validate a Danish four-subscale version of the RIPLS in a sample of 370 health-care students and 200 health professionals.
The questionnaire was translated following a two-step process, including forward and backward translations, and a pilot test. A test of internal consistency and a test-retest of reliability were performed using a web-based questionnaire.
The questionnaire was completed by 370 health care students and 200 health professionals (test) whereas the retest was completed by 203 health professionals. A full data set of first-time responses was generated from the 570 students and professionals at baseline (test). Good internal association was found between items in Positive Professional Identity (Q13-Q16), with factor loadings between 0.61 and 0.72. The confirmatory factor analyses revealed 11 items with factor loadings above 0.50, 18 below 0.50, and no items below 0.20. Weighted kappa values were between 0.20 and 0.40, 16 items with values between 0.40 and 0.60, and six items between 0.60 and 0.80; all showing p-values below 0.001.
Strong internal consistency was found for both populations. The Danish RIPLS proved a stable and reliable instrument for the Teamwork and Collaboration, Negative Professional Identity, and Positive Professional Identity subscales, while the Roles and Responsibility subscale showed some limitations. The reason behind these limitations is unclear.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26879933 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and validation of the instrument Clinical Learning Environment and Supervision for medical students in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280942
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2016 Dec 01;16(1):308
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2016
Author
Eva Öhman
Hassan Alinaghizadeh
Päivi Kaila
Håkan Hult
Gunnar H Nilsson
Helena Salminen
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2016 Dec 01;16(1):308
Date
Dec-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - standards
Educational Measurement
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Learning
Primary Health Care
Reproducibility of Results
Students, Medical - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Workplace
Abstract
Clinical learning takes place in complex socio-cultural environments that are workplaces for the staff and learning places for the students. In the clinical context, the students learn by active participation and in interaction with the rest of the community at the workplace. Clinical learning occurs outside the university, therefore is it important for both the university and the student that the student is given opportunities to evaluate the clinical placements with an instrument that allows evaluation from many perspectives. The instrument Clinical Learning Environment and Supervision (CLES) was originally developed for evaluation of nursing students' clinical learning environment. The aim of this study was to adapt and validate the CLES instrument to measure medical students' perceptions of their learning environment in primary health care.
In the adaptation process the face validity was tested by an expert panel of primary care physicians, who were also active clinical supervisors. The adapted CLES instrument with 25 items and six background questions was sent electronically to 1,256 medical students from one university. Answers from 394 students were eligible for inclusion. Exploratory factor analysis based on principal component methods followed by oblique rotation was used to confirm the adequate number of factors in the data. Construct validity was assessed by factor analysis. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to confirm the dimensions of CLES instrument.
The construct validity showed a clearly indicated four-factor model. The cumulative variance explanation was 0.65, and the overall Cronbach's alpha was 0.95. All items loaded similarly with the dimensions in the non-adapted CLES except for one item that loaded to another dimension. The CLES instrument in its adapted form had high construct validity and high reliability and internal consistency.
CLES, in its adapted form, appears to be a valid instrument to evaluate medical students' perceptions of their clinical learning environment in primary health care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27905932 View in PubMed
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Adaptation, data quality and confirmatory factor analysis of the Danish version of the PACIC questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138823
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2012 Feb;22(1):31-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Helle Terkildsen Maindal
Ineta Sokolowski
Peter Vedsted
Author Affiliation
Section of General Practice, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. htm@alm.au.dk
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2012 Feb;22(1):31-6
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diabetes mellitus, type 2 - therapy
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Participation
Patient satisfaction
Psychometrics
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires - standards
Abstract
The Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) 20-item questionnaire measures how chronic care patients perceive their involvement in care. We aimed to adapt the measure into Danish and to assess data quality, internal consistency and the proposed factorial structure.
The PACIC was translated by a standardised forward-backward procedure, and filled in by 560 patients receiving type 2 diabetes care. Data quality was assessed by mean, median, item response, missing values, floor and ceiling effects, internal consistency (Cronbach's a and average inter-item correlation), item-rest correlations and factorial structure was assessed by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA).
The item response was high (missing answers: 0.5-2.9%). Floor effect was 2.7-69.2%, above 15% for 17 items. Ceiling effect was 4.0-40.4%, above 15% for 12 items. The subscales had average inter-item correlations over 0.30 and CFA showed high factor loadings (range 0.67-0.77). All had a over 0.7 and included items with both high and low loadings. The CFA model fit was good for two indices out of six (TLI and SRMR).
Danish PACIC is now available and validated in primary care in a type 2 diabetes population. The psychometric properties were satisfactory apart from ceiling and floor effects. We endorse the proposed five scale structure. All the subscales showed good model fit, and may be used for separate sum scores.
PubMed ID
21134901 View in PubMed
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Adapting the Jalowiec Coping Scale in Norwegian adult psoriasis patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200970
Source
Qual Life Res. 1999 Aug;8(5):435-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
A. Wahl
T. Moum
B R Hanestad
I. Wiklund
M H Kalfoss
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. astrid.klopstad.wahl@hib.no
Source
Qual Life Res. 1999 Aug;8(5):435-45
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Psoriasis - psychology
Psychometrics - methods
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to adapt the Jalowiec Coping Scale (JCS) to accommodate adult patients with psoriasis. The sample comprised 334 patients who were treated consecutively at three dermatology departments in the eastern Norway. A total number of 273 hospitalised patients (20%) and out-patients (80%) completed the questionnaire, yielding a response rate of 82%. The study assessed the reliability and the face, content and construct validity of the Norwegian version of the JCS. In addition, researchers investigated the most frequently used/effective coping strategies, the relationships between demographic/clinical variables, self-reported physical symptoms and the use of coping strategies. The results (correlational coefficients and interitem alpha s) indicated that there was an overlap in substantive content among the original JCS subscales, due either to measurement error (bias or response style) and/or because the patients in the present study were in a demanding situation in relation to their disease, which may have activated a variety of coping strategies. A factor analysis resulted in a three-factor solution (confrontive problem-solving, normalising/optimistic and combined emotive) with satisfactory internal consistency. This factor solution comprised 31 items with an explained variance of 37% of the total pool of items. The most frequently used and effective coping strategies could be labelled as emotion-focused (optimistic/maintain control). Significant correlations were found between age, hospital setting, self-reported physical symptoms and different coping subscales. However, further studies are needed to assess the validity and reliability of the JCS among different population groups in Norway.
PubMed ID
10474285 View in PubMed
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Adherence to self-care and social support.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47594
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2001 Sep;10(5):618-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
M. Toljamo
M. Hentinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing and Health Administration, Oulu University Hospital, University of Oulu, Finland. maisa.toljamo@oulu.fi
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2001 Sep;10(5):618-27
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - metabolism - prevention & control - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Family - psychology
Female
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Logistic Models
Male
Nursing Methodology Research
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Education - standards
Peer Group
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Self Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Support
Abstract
The purpose of the study reported in this paper was to describe adherence to self-care, perceived difficulties and social support in a group of adult patients (n = 213) with insulin-treated diabetes from two outpatient clinics in Northern Finland. Data were collected by questionnaire. The instruments were developed to measure adherence to self-care, difficulties in self-care and social support. The response rate was 76%. One-way ANOVA, logistic regression analysis, contingency and Pearson's correlation coefficients were used in the statistical analysis. A fifth of the respondents were neglecting their self-care. The others undertook flexible, regimen-adherent or self-planned self-care. The subjects had no difficulties with insulin treatment, but had more problems with other aspects of self-care. Poor metabolic control, smoking and living alone predicted neglect of self-care, but if patients had support from family and friends, living alone was not a predictor of neglect of self-care. Those with poor metabolic control perceived themselves as getting peer support from other persons with diabetes.
PubMed ID
11822512 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' self-efficacy to overcome barriers to Physical Activity Scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116730
Source
Res Q Exerc Sport. 2012 Dec;83(4):513-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
John J M Dwyer
Tala Chulak
Scott Maitland
Kenneth R Allison
Daria C Lysy
Guy E J Faulkner
Judy Sheeshka
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition at the University of Guelph, College of Social and Applied Human Sciences, Ontario, Canada. dwyer@uoguelph.ca
Source
Res Q Exerc Sport. 2012 Dec;83(4):513-21
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Attitude to Health
Chi-Square Distribution
Exercise
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Self Efficacy
Abstract
This paper describes a revised measure of self-efficacy to overcome barriers to moderate and vigorous physical activity in a sample of 484 high school students in Toronto, Ontario. The students had a mean age of 15.3 years. Principal axis factoring with oblique rotation yielded five factors: self-efficacy to overcome internal, harassment, physical environment, social environment, and responsibilities barriers. Two problematic items were removed, which resulted in a 22-item measure. Subsequent analyses were conducted on responses to this shortened measure. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the five-factor model and demonstrated age- and sex-invariance. The subscales had good internal consistency reliability. Structural regressions demonstrated a strong relationship between the resulting factors and a physical activity measure (energy expenditure), showing predictive validity.
PubMed ID
23367813 View in PubMed
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1073 records – page 1 of 108.