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1063 records – page 1 of 107.

Validating the 'clinical learning environment, supervision and nurse teacher' CLES+T instrument in primary healthcare settings using confirmatory factor analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124305
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2012 Jun;21(11-12):1785-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Elisabeth Bos
Hassan Alinaghizadeh
Mikko Saarikoski
Päivi Kaila
Author Affiliation
Center for Family and Community Medicine, Huddinge, Sweden. elisabeth.bos@sll.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2012 Jun;21(11-12):1785-8
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Faculty, Nursing
Humans
Learning
Nurses
Sweden
PubMed ID
22594389 View in PubMed
Less detail

Data quality and factor analysis of the Danish version of the Relationship Scale Questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285664
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(5):e0176810
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Christina Maar Andersen
Anette Fischer Pedersen
Anders Helles Carlsen
Frede Olesen
Peter Vedsted
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(5):e0176810
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The Relationship Scale Questionnaire (RSQ) is a widely-used measure of adult attachment, but whether the results obtained by the RSQ fit the attachment construct has only been examined to a limited extent.
The objectives of this study were to investigate the psychometric properties of the Danish translation of the RSQ and to test whether the results are consistent with the hypothesized model of attachment.
The study included two samples: 602 general practitioners and 611 cancer patients. The two samples were analyzed separately. Data quality was assessed by mean, median and missing values for each item, floor and ceiling effects, average inter-item correlations and Cronbach's a for each subscale. Test-retest was assessed by intra-class correlations among 76 general practitioners. A confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to establish evidence of the four proposed subscales. Due to an inadequate fit of the model, data was randomly split into two equally sized subsamples and an exploratory factor analysis was conducted for all 30 items in the first subsample comprised of 286 cancer patients and 285 general practitioners. The EFA yielded a three-factor structure which was validated through a confirmatory factor analyses in a second subsample comprised of 278 cancer patients and 289 general practitioners.
The data quality of the RSQ was generally good, except low internal consistency and low to moderate test-retest reliability. The four subscales of the RSQ were not confirmed by the confirmatory factor analysis. An exploratory factor analysis suggested a three-factor solution for both general practitioners and patients, which accounted for 61.1% of the variance among general practitioners and 62.5% among patients. The new three-factor solution was verified in a confirmatory factor analyses.
The proposed four-factor model of the RSQ could not be confirmed in this study. Similar challenges have been found by other studies validating the RSQ. An alternative three-factor structure was found for the RSQ.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28472074 View in PubMed
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Stability of a factor-analytic description of smoking behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41011
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 1980 Jun;5(6):467-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1980
Author
J S Williams
D W Crumpacker
M J Krier
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 1980 Jun;5(6):467-78
Date
Jun-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Motivation
Psychological Tests
Smoking - psychology
Abstract
Three types of human smoking behavior, identified by factor analysis of questionnaire responses, were found to exhibit a stable structure in a series of different populations and environments. Type I smoking behavior is closely related to a personally perceived need for tobacco products. Types II and III are related to psychosocial-sensorimotor rewards and the intensification of pleasure, respectively. The typology is easily detectable and remarkably constant in the following populations: staff, employees, and patients of a teaching hospital in London, England; urbanites and suburbanites of mixed ages in a part of metropolitan Denver, Colorado, U.S.A.; college students in Fort Collins, Colorado, U.S.A., elderly urbanites and suburbanites in the metropolitan areas of (a) Stockholm, Sweden and (b) G?teborg, Sweden; and the adult children of the Swedish groups (a) and (b).
PubMed ID
7379702 View in PubMed
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Ethnic stereotypes: a factor analytic investigation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110788
Source
Can J Psychol. 1968 Feb;22(1):35-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1968

Applicability of general grief theory to Swedish women's experience after early miscarriage, with factor analysis of Bonanno's taxonomy, using the Perinatal Grief Scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142108
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 2010 Aug;115(3):201-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Annsofie Adolfsson
Per-Göran Larsson
Author Affiliation
School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden. annsofie.adolfsson@his.se
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 2010 Aug;115(3):201-9
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Grief
Humans
Pregnancy
Sweden
Abstract
Grief is a normal phenomenon but showing great variation depending on cultural and personal features. Bonanno and Kaltman have nonetheless proposed five aspects of normal grief. The aim of this study was to investigate if women with miscarriage experience normal grief.
Content analyses of 25 transcribed conversations with women 4 weeks after their early miscarriages were classified depending on the meaning-bearing units according to Bonanno and Kaltman's categories. In the factor analyses, these categories were compared with the Perinatal Grief Scale and women's age, number of children and number of miscarriages, and gestational weeks.
Women with miscarriage fulfill the criteria for having normal grief according to Bonanno and Kaltman. All of the 25 women had meaning-bearing units that were classified as cognitive disorganization, dysphoria, and health deficits, whereas disrupted social and occupational functioning and positive aspects of bereavement were represented in 22 of 25 women. From the factor analysis, there are no differences in the expression of the intensity of the grief, irrespective of whether or not the women were primiparous, younger, or had suffered a first miscarriage.
Women's experience of grief after miscarriage is similar to general grief after death. After her loss, the woman must have the possibility of expressing and working through her grief before she can finish her pregnancy emotionally. The care-giver must facilitate this process and accept that the intensity of the grief is not dependent on the woman's age, or her number of earlier miscarriages.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20636255 View in PubMed
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Swedish translation, adaptation and psychometric evaluation of the Context Assessment Index (CAI).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123926
Source
Worldviews Evid Based Nurs. 2013 Feb;10(1):41-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Kerstin Nilsson Kajermo
Heidi Böe
Eva Johansson
Eva Henriksen
Brendan McCormack
J Petter Gustavsson
Lars Wallin
Author Affiliation
Clinical Research Utilization (CRU), Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Worldviews Evid Based Nurs. 2013 Feb;10(1):41-50
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Nursing Evaluation Research
Psychometrics - methods
Questionnaires
Sweden
Translations
Abstract
The strength of and relationship between the fundamental elements context, evidence and facilitation of the PARIHS framework are proposed to be key for successful implementation of evidence into healthcare practice. A better understanding of the presence and strength of contextual factors is assumed to enhance the opportunities of adequately developing an implementation strategy for a specific setting. A tool for assessing context-The Context Assessment Index (CAI)-was developed and published 2009. A Swedish version of the instrument was developed and evaluated among registered nurses. This work forms the focus of this paper.
The purpose of this study was to translate the CAI into Swedish, adapt the instrument for use in Swedish healthcare practice and assess its psychometric properties.
The instrument was translated and back-translated to English. The feasibility of items and response scales were evaluated through think aloud interviews with clinically active nurses. Psychometric properties were evaluated in a sample of registered nurses (n = 373) working in a variety of healthcare organisations in the Stockholm area. Item and factor analyses and Cronbach's alpha were computed to evaluate internal structure and internal consistency.
Sixteen items were modified based on the think aloud interviews and to adapt the instrument for use in acute care. A ceiling effect was observed for many items and the originally identified 37 item five-factor model was not confirmed. Item analyses showed an overlap between factors and indicated a one-dimensional scale.
The Swedish version of the CAI has a wider application than the original instrument. This might have contributed to the differences in factor structure. Different opportunities for further development of the scale are discussed.
Further evaluation of the psychometric properties of the CAI is required.
PubMed ID
22647076 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Use of factor analysis in selecting in main traits lying at the basis of the physical development of adult women].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature253030
Source
Gig Sanit. 1974 Nov;(11):73-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1974
Author
V N Ianina
Source
Gig Sanit. 1974 Nov;(11):73-6
Date
Nov-1974
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anthropometry
Body constitution
Computers
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Growth
Humans
Russia
PubMed ID
4282361 View in PubMed
Less detail

First year nursing students' viewpoints about compromised clinical safety.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123840
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2013 May;33(5):475-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Laura A Killam
Sharolyn Mossey
Phyllis Montgomery
Katherine E Timmermans
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences and Emergency Services, Cambrian College, 1400 Barrydowne Road, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3A 3V8. laura.killam@cambriancollege.ca
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2013 May;33(5):475-80
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Canada
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Patient Safety
Q-Sort
Abstract
Undergraduate nursing students must uphold patient safety as a professional and moral obligation across all clinical learning experiences. This expectation commences at entry into the nursing program. As part of a larger study exploring undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students' understanding of clinical safety, this paper specifically focuses on first year students' viewpoints about unsafe clinical learning situations.
Q-methodology was used. Sixty-eight first year nursing students participated in the ranking of 43 statements indicative of unsafe clinical situations and practices. Data was entered into a Q-program for factor analysis.
The results revealed a typology of four discrete viewpoints of unsafe clinical situations for first year students. These viewpoints included an overwhelming sense of inner discomfort, practicing contrary to conventions, lacking in professional integrity and disharmonizing relations. Overall, a consensus viewpoint described exonerating the clinical educator as not being solely responsible for clinical safety.
This information may assist students and educators to cooperatively and purposefully construct a clinical learning milieu conducive to safety.
PubMed ID
22658213 View in PubMed
Less detail

Interaction between employees' physical load factors and early support at the workplace.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127195
Source
Work. 2012;41 Suppl 1:394-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Simo Kaleva
Johanna Turja
Marketta Kivistö
Jorma Seitsamo
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, Helsinki, Finland. simo.kaleva@ttl.fi
Source
Work. 2012;41 Suppl 1:394-6
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Occupational Health
Questionnaires
Weight-Bearing
Workplace
Abstract
Physical workload is a continuous problem, even in modern workplaces. The purpose of the survey was to determine the effect of support on employees' physical load factors at workplaces. Training, guidance and support were the main focus areas of the early support intervention, which aimed to enable supervisors to find weak signals of impaired ergonomics.The survey was carried out in the form of a controlled longitudinal study, and the material was gathered via a questionnaire in both 2008 and 2010 from two co-operative trade groups. The final sample was 301 intervention subjects and 235 control subjects, and the response rate was 45% in both groups. We applied factor analysis to reduce the number of items. The physical load factors' sum score consisted of six items. We used logistic regression in the statistical analysis.Encouragement to improve processes at the workplace increased the probability of positive change (i.e. decrease) in physical load factors. The same applied to working pace, if individuals could control it themselves. In contrast, workload and the support of supervisors had a reversed impact on workers' physical load factors. Focusing on promoting workers' ergonomics is still important in workplaces when aiming to decrease physical load factors.
PubMed ID
22316756 View in PubMed
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The structure of self-care in a group of elderly people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191234
Source
Nurs Sci Q. 2001 Jan;14(1):55-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
O. Söderhamn
C. Cliffordson
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Trollhättan/Uddevalla University, Vänersborg, Sweden.
Source
Nurs Sci Q. 2001 Jan;14(1):55-8
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Self Care
Self Efficacy
Sweden
Abstract
According to Orem's self-care deficit theory of nursing, the structure of self-care consists of self-care agency balanced by therapeutic self-care demand. Different conditioning factors constitute these two constructs. The aim of this study was to investigate through secondary analysis the structure of self-care in a group of elderly. Data were originally collected from a total of 125 randomly chosen elderly individuals (65+ years of age) in Sweden by means of a mailed questionnaire. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to show that self-care agency was totally and significantly balanced against therapeutic self-care demand and explained by five conditioning factors.
PubMed ID
11873355 View in PubMed
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1063 records – page 1 of 107.