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216 records – page 1 of 22.

110 million dollars vaccine research centre to be built in Saskatoon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164710
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Mar 13;176(6):751
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-13-2007
Source
Contemp Longterm Care. 1990 Jun;13(6):31-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990

Aalto University Undergraduate Centre. Protected Alvar Aalto Building Awarded for Accessibility After Renovation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282482
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;229:256-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Antti Raike
Antti Ahlava
Teemu Tuomi
Pauliina Skyttä
Ira Verma
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;229:256-9
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Architectural Accessibility - standards
Awards and Prizes
Facility Design and Construction
Finland
Universities
Abstract
The main building of the former Helsinki University of Technology (TKK) designed by Alvar Aalto is part of the cultural heritage in Finland. The building underwent a major renovation in 2011-2015 and has now become an awarded Undergraduate Centre for the modern interdisciplinary education of Aalto University. This paper presents how the architectural masterpiece from the 1960's was renovated and updated into a modern and accessible university building. Particular attention was paid for entering the building by wheelchairs, prams and pushchairs. The successful renovation was awarded in 2015 by the 'Esteetön Suomi -palkinto' (Accessible Finland Award), given every two years as a mark of recognition to activities or locations implementing the principles of accessibility and Universal Design for all on a broad scale and in a nationally significant way.
PubMed ID
27534312 View in PubMed
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Accessibility and usability of the physical housing environment of seniors with stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178743
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2004 Sep;27(3):203-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Denise Reid
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1V7, Canada.
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2004 Sep;27(3):203-8
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disabled Persons
Facility Design and Construction
Female
Housing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Psychological Tests
Stroke - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
This study measured how stroke survivors perceived their housing environment. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected using the Usability in My Home Questionnaire with 19 stroke survivors who all lived in the community. Overall, they reported that the design of their homes allowed them to manage their self-care activities but not all of their household activities. The outside design of the home posed difficulties, with uneven ground and poor lighting and stair access. Inside the home, space was a problem, particularly for stroke survivors using wheelchairs. Living in restricted spaces was the result of the person-technology-environment fit. These results show that the housing environment is not experienced similarly by all old persons, and that the environmental experiences reported by the sample often appear inconsistent with the quality of their housing environment as judged by objective indicators; for instance, subjective reports are often more favorable than would be expected in light of the limiting aspects of the objective environment. Recommendations for housing design strategies and for occupational therapy practice are offered.
PubMed ID
15319690 View in PubMed
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Age, bodyweight, smoking habits and the risk of severe osteoarthritis in the hip and knee in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13723
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2005;20(6):537-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Bengt Järvholm
Stefan Lewold
Henrik Malchau
Eva Vingård
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Seweden. bengt.jarholm@envmed.umu.se
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2005;20(6):537-42
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - utilization
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - utilization
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Facility Design and Construction - manpower
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Industry - classification
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Hip - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Osteoarthritis, Knee - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to estimate the risk of severe osteoarthritis, with the need for arthroplasty, in the knee and/or hip according to body mass index (BMI) both within a normal range and in persons with high BMI. Furthermore, we wanted to study the significance of smoking. METHODS: This study identifies male construction workers participating in a national health control program (n = 320,192). The incidence rate for joint replacement was found by matching with the Swedish hospital discharge register between 1987 and 1998. BMI and smoking habit was registered at the time of the health examination. RESULTS: In total 1495 cases of osteoarthritis of the hip and 502 cases of osteoarthritis of the knee were identified and included in this analysis. The incidence rate was found to increase linearly to the BMI even within low and 'normal' BMI. The relative risk for osteoarthritis of the hip was more than two times higher in persons with a BMI of 20-24 than in men with a BMI 17-19. There was almost a doubling of the risk of severe knee osteoarthritis with an increase in BMI of 5 kg/m2. Smoker had a lower risk of osteoarthritis than non-smokers and ex-smokers. CONCLUSIONS: BMI is an important predictor of osteoarthritis even within normal BMI. A decreased risk of osteoarthritis of the hip was found in smokers, but the effect was weak compared to that of BMI or age. Contrary to studies of radiographic osteoarthritis our study indicates higher risk of hip than of knee osteoarthritis.
PubMed ID
16121763 View in PubMed
Less detail

Airborne methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) concentrations associated with the application of polyurethane spray foam in residential construction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165490
Source
J Occup Environ Hyg. 2007 Feb;4(2):145-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Jacques Lesage
Jennifer Stanley
William J Karoly
Fran W Lichtenberg
Author Affiliation
Institut de Recherche Robert-Sauvé en Santé et en Securité du Travail, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. lesage.jacques@irsst.qc.ca
Source
J Occup Environ Hyg. 2007 Feb;4(2):145-55
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - standards
Canada
Chlorofluorocarbons - analysis - standards
Chlorofluorocarbons, Ethane
Facility Design and Construction
Housing
Humans
Isocyanates - analysis - standards
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Particle Size
Polyurethanes
Threshold Limit Values
United States
Abstract
The primary objectives of this study were (a) to measure potential exposures of applicators and assistants to airborne methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI), (b) to measure airborne concentrations of MDI at various distances from the spray foam application, and (c) to measure airborne MDI concentrations as a function of time elapsed since application. Other study objectives were, (a) to compare the results from filter and impinger samples; (b) to determine the particle size distribution in the spray foam aerosol; (c) to determine potential exposures to dichlorofluoroethane; and (d) to measure any off-gassing of MDI after the foam had fully cured. This study was conducted during application of spray polyurethane foam inside five single-family homes under construction in the United States and Canada. Spray foam applicators and assistants may be exposed to airborne MDI concentrations above the OSHA permissible exposure limit. At these concentrations, OSHA recommends appropriate respiratory protection during spray foam application to prevent airborne MDI exposures above established limits and to protect against exposure to dichlorofluoroethane (HCFC-141b). Airborne MDI concentrations decrease rapidly after foam application ceases. The highest airborne concentrations measured after 15 min and 45 min were 0.019 mg/m3 and 0.003 mg/m3, respectively. After 45 min, airborne concentrations were below the limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 0.036-microg per sample. For samples taken 24 hours after completion of foaming, results were also below the LOQ. Approximately two-thirds of the total mass of the airborne particles in the spray foam aerosol was greater than 3.5 microns in diameter. Airborne MDI concentrations determined by filter sampling methods were 6% to 40% lower than those determined by impinger methods.
PubMed ID
17249149 View in PubMed
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[An architect asks: why are these not more alternative living forms designed for long-term patients?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244563
Source
Lakartidningen. 1981 Apr 29;78(18):1880-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-29-1981
Author
G. Hultén
Source
Lakartidningen. 1981 Apr 29;78(18):1880-2
Date
Apr-29-1981
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Disabled Persons
Facility Design and Construction
Humans
Quality of Life
Sweden
PubMed ID
6455576 View in PubMed
Less detail

[An improvement in the functional structure of specialized sanatoria for disabled children with their parents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211515
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 1996 Jul-Aug;(4):35-8
Publication Type
Article

216 records – page 1 of 22.