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Achieved competences in temporomandibular disorders/orofacial pain: a comparison between two dental schools in Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279263
Source
Eur J Dent Educ. 2015 Aug;19(3):161-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Z. Alsafi
A. Michelotti
R. Ohrbach
M. Nilner
T. List
Source
Eur J Dent Educ. 2015 Aug;19(3):161-8
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Dental
Facial pain
Female
Humans
Italy
Male
Personal Satisfaction
Schools, Dental
Students, Dental
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders
Abstract
The aim was to study achieved competences in temporomandibular disorders (TMD)/orofacial pain (OP) at two universities by comparing student's knowledge and understanding, satisfaction with their education and confidence in their clinical competences of TMD/OP.
The study was conducted in collaboration between Malmö University, Sweden—which uses problem-based learning—and the University of Naples Federico II, Italy—which uses traditional educational methods. Final-semester dental students responded to a self-report questionnaire regarding their knowledge and understanding, interpretation of cases histories, clinical experience, satisfaction and confidence in clinical examination, management and treatment evaluation.
No significant difference was found between the students regarding knowledge and understanding. Eighty-seven per cent of the Malmö students and 96% of the Naples students met the criterion on achieved competence. Malmö students had a higher per cent of correct diagnoses than Naples students in the interpretation of case histories. Overall, Malmö students reported most clinical experience and higher confidence than Naple students.
The main findings were that students from Malmö and Naples were, similar in knowledge and understanding of TMD/OP and in satisfaction with their clinical competences. However, Malmö students perceived more confidence in clinical management of patients with TMD/OP. This may reflect that, besides the theoretical part of the programme, a sufficient level of clinical exposure to patients with TMD/OP is essential to gain competences in TMD/OP.
PubMed ID
25168490 View in PubMed
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Assessment and further development of RDC/TMD Axis II biobehavioural instruments: a research programme progress report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141617
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 2010 Oct;37(10):784-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
R. Ohrbach
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA. ohrbach@buffalo.edu
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 2010 Oct;37(10):784-98
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bruxism - psychology
Checklist
Congresses as topic
Consensus
Depression - diagnosis
Facial Pain - psychology
Humans
Ontario
Pain Measurement
Psychophysiologic Disorders - diagnosis
Range of Motion, Articular
Reference Standards
Reproducibility of Results
Sickness Impact Profile
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Abstract
A symposium was held in Toronto, 2008, in which research progress regarding the biobehavioural dimension of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) was presented. An extended workshop was held in April 2009 in which further recommendations were made from an expert panel, using the 2008 symposium material as a base. This paper is a summary of the 2008 symposium proceedings with elaborations based on further developments. Seven studies were conducted between 2001 and 2008, in which the following were investigated: (i) basic properties of Axis II instruments, (ii) reliability and criterion validity of Axis II instruments, (iii) expansion of predictors, (iv) metric equivalence of the depression and non-specific physical symptoms subscales in the RDC/TMD, (v) laboratory investigation of oral behaviours, (vi) field data collection of oral behaviours, and (vii) functional limitation of the jaw. Methods and results for each of these studies are described. Based on the results of these studies that have been published, as well as the direction of interim results from the few studies that await completion and publication, the biobehavioural domain of the RDC/TMD, as published in 1992, is reliable and valid. These results also provide strong evidence supporting the future growth of the biobehavioural domain as the RDC/TMD matures into subsequent protocols for both clinical and research applications.
PubMed ID
20701668 View in PubMed
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Association Between Clinical Signs of Temporomandibular Disorders and Psychological Distress Among an Adult Finnish Population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269758
Source
J Oral Facial Pain Headache. 2015;29(4):370-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Lauri Tuuliainen
Kirsi Sipilä
Pirjo Mäki
Mauno Könönen
Anna Liisa Suominen
Source
J Oral Facial Pain Headache. 2015;29(4):370-7
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Facial Pain - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Masticatory Muscles - pathology
Middle Aged
Myalgia - epidemiology
Palpation
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
To evaluate the association between signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and psychological distress in a general population-based sample of Finnish adults.
The Health 2000 Survey was conducted in 2000-2001 by the National Institute for Health and Welfare in Finland. Of the sample of adults aged 30 or over (n=8,028), 79% participated in a clinical oral health examination, which included examination of TMD signs. The participants (n=6,155) also completed questionnaires, including the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), which measured psychological distress. Associations between TMD signs and psychological distress measured by the GHQ-12 were examined in both genders. Statistical measures included chi-square tests, t tests, and logistic regression analyses.
The prevalence of the TMD signs (limited opening, clicking, crepitation, temporomandibular joint [TMJ] palpation pain, and muscle palpation pain) was 11.2%, 17.6%, 10.5%, 5.1%, and 18.9% in women, and 6.1%, 12.9%, 5.3%, 2.4%, and 7.2% in men, respectively. High GHQ-12 scores, measured as continuous variables and in quartiles by distress level, were significantly associated with masticatory muscle pain on palpation in both genders (P
PubMed ID
26485384 View in PubMed
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Association between craniomandibular disorders and occlusal interferences in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223874
Source
J Prosthet Dent. 1992 May;67(5):692-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
P. Kirveskari
P. Alanen
T. Jämsä
Author Affiliation
Department of Stomatognathic Physiology, University of Turku, Institute of Dentistry, Finland.
Source
J Prosthet Dent. 1992 May;67(5):692-6
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dental Occlusion, Balanced
Dental Occlusion, Centric
Dental Occlusion, Traumatic - epidemiology - therapy
Facial Pain - physiopathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mandible - physiopathology
Masticatory Muscles - physiopathology
Movement
Sound
Temporomandibular Joint - physiopathology
Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction Syndrome - epidemiology - physiopathology
Time Factors
Abstract
The association between clinical signs of craniomandibular disorders (CMD) and occlusal interferences was studied longitudinally in two cohorts of children, 5 and 10 years of age at baseline, representing the nonpatient population. They were followed up for 5 years. The range of active participants was 96 to 106 in the younger group, and 64 to 74 in the older group. The subjects were seen annually for registration of signs of CMD and for the presence of interferences, and for a real or placebo occlusal adjustment. The double-blind study design was applied. Baseline data showed no association between the variables studied; parts of data from second and third examinations disclosed significant associations; and fourth, fifth and sixth examinations disclosed a consistent pattern of significant associations.
PubMed ID
1527758 View in PubMed
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Association between optimism and self-reported facial pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81661
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2006 Jun;64(3):177-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Sipilä Kirsi
Ylöstalo Pekka V
Ek Ellen
Zitting Paavo
Knuuttila Matti L
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. kirsi.sipila@oulu.fi
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2006 Jun;64(3):177-82
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Attitude
Attitude to Health
Cohort Studies
Depression - psychology
Educational Status
Facial Pain - psychology - therapy
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - psychology
Income
Male
Marital status
Migraine Disorders - psychology
Toothache - psychology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess the association between optimism and self-reported facial pain. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data were obtained for 5,696 subjects born in 1966 in Northern Finland and included in the study of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort. Data on facial pain were collected using a questionnaire. Optimism was measured using the revised version of the Life Orientation Test. RESULTS: The data showed that optimism was inversely associated with facial pain. Associations were found only among non-depressive subjects. CONCLUSIONS: It can be concluded that optimism is an independent psychosocial determinant of pain experience that should be taken into account in assessing the prognosis of facial pain and its treatment.
PubMed ID
16809196 View in PubMed
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Association between symptoms of temporomandibular disorders and depression: an epidemiological study of the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46085
Source
Cranio. 2001 Jul;19(3):183-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
K. Sipilä
J. Veijola
J. Jokelainen
M R Järvelin
K S Oikarinen
A M Raustia
M. Joukamaa
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Dept of Prosthetic Dentistry and Stomatognathic Physiology, Finland. kirsir@cc.oulu.fi
Source
Cranio. 2001 Jul;19(3):183-7
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology
Facial Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Facial pain and other symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are rather common in the adult population. According to clinical studies, psychological factors play an important role in the etiology and maintenance of these symptoms. On the other hand, chronic pain can cause depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between symptoms of TMD and depression in a large population sample of young adults. The study was a part of the 31-year follow-up study of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort consisting of 12,058 live births from the year 1966. Questionnaire information concerning TMD symptoms was collected from a subsample of 5,696 subjects. Depression was measured with a question about reported depression (diagnosed by a doctor) and with the Symptom Checklist depression subscale (SCL-25 DS). Of the TMD symptoms, those related to pain had the most significant relations to indicators of depression. In both genders, the proportion of depression indicated with the SCL-25 DS was significantly higher in subjects with pain-related symptoms of TMD, i.e., facial pain and "pain at jaw rest", and in men with "pain on jaw movement", compared with non-pain subjects (p0.05), except "difficulties in mouth opening" among women. Among women, the prevalence of recognized depression was also significantly higher in subjects with pain-related symptoms of TMD, compared with subjects with no pain (p
PubMed ID
11482830 View in PubMed
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Association of depressiveness with chronic facial pain: a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122444
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 May-Jul;71(3-4):644-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kirsi Sipilä
Pirjo Mäki
Anne Laajala
Anja Taanila
Matti Joukamaa
Juha Veijola
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland. kirsi.sipila@uef.fi
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 May-Jul;71(3-4):644-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Depression - complications
Facial Pain - complications
Female
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Abstract
Depression and pain are often co-morbid. Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) include facial pain as one main symptom. Reports are lacking on the association between chronic facial pain and earlier depressiveness. The aim of the study was to investigate whether depressiveness increases the risk for chronic facial pain in a longitudinal population-based study.
Subjects included in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (n = 5696) answered a questionnaire on facial pain and depressiveness using the Symptom Checklist-25 depression sub-scale at the age of 31 years. In addition, reported depression diagnosed by a doctor was enquired about. Three years later a sub-sample of the cohort, including 63 cases with chronic facial pain and 85 pain-free controls, was formed based on the question concerning facial pain.
Of the chronic facial pain cases 17.5% and of the pain-free controls 7.1% were depressive 3 years earlier at baseline (p = 0.050, ?(2) test, crude OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.0-8.0). Of the chronic facial pain cases 6.3% and of the pain-free controls 1.2% reported having had diagnosed depression (p = 0.085, crude OR = 5.7, 95% CI = 0.6-52.2). After adjusting the gender, the association between depressiveness reported at the baseline and chronic facial pain was significant (OR = 4.2, 95% CI = 1.1-16.2). When widespread pain was included in the analysis, the association was not significant.
Depressiveness increases the risk for chronic facial pain in a 3-year follow-up. This association seems to be mediated through widespread pain.
PubMed ID
22816436 View in PubMed
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Association of risk factors with temporomandibular disorders in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296577
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2018 Oct; 76(7):525-529
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Päivi Jussila
Jarno Knuutila
Sampo Salmela
Ritva Näpänkangas
Jari Päkkilä
Pertti Pirttiniemi
Aune Raustia
Author Affiliation
a Research Unit of Oral Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine , University of Oulu , Oulu , Finland.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2018 Oct; 76(7):525-529
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Depression - epidemiology
Facial Pain - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate the association between risk factors and pain-related symptoms and clinical signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC) 1966.
A total of 1962 subjects (1050 women, 912 men) attended the follow-up study. The questionnaires included the subjects' background information concerning living conditions and general health, socioeconomic factors, and dental health. The clinical examination was performed using the modified protocol of Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) presented at the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) Conference in 2010. Cross-tabulation, a chi-square test and Fisher's exact test were used to analyze differences between groups.
Female gender showed statistically significant association with symptoms and signs of TMD, while marital status, living conditions, and socioeconomic group showed no association. A strong association was found between self-reported health condition as well as general health problems [i.e. depression, migraine, fibromyalgia (FM), gastrointestinal diseases] and TMD pain-related symptoms and pain on palpation in the masticatory muscles and TMJs.
In conclusion, general health problems and female gender had a strong association with pain-related symptoms and clinical signs of TMD. These findings are important to take into account when diagnosing and treating TMD patients. Conversely to earlier presented results, no statistically significant association was shown here between marital status, living conditions or socioeconomic group and pain-related symptoms and clinical signs of TMD.
PubMed ID
29916756 View in PubMed
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Association of sense of coherence and clinical signs of temporomandibular disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88821
Source
J Orofac Pain. 2009;23(2):147-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Sipilä Kirsi
Ylöstalo Pekka
Könönen Mauno
Uutela Antti
Knuuttila Matti
Author Affiliation
Department of Stomatognathic Physiology and Prosthetic Dentistry, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland. kirsi.sipila@oulu.fi
Source
J Orofac Pain. 2009;23(2):147-52
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arthralgia - psychology
Facial Pain - psychology
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Logistic Models
Male
Masticatory Muscles - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Social Environment
Stress, Psychological
Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction Syndrome - psychology
Vertical Dimension
Abstract
AIMS: To investigate the association of sense of coherence (SOC) with clinical findings of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) among 30- to 64-year-old subjects. METHODS: A nationally representative health examination survey called the Health 2000 Survey was carried out from 2000 to 2001. The data for this study were obtained from 4859 subjects aged 30 to 64 years who had participated in an interview, been clinically examined, and returned a self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire included a SOC scale which was a 12-item version of the SOC-13 scale. Based on a clinical examination for TMD, the following variables were formed: maximum interincisal distance
PubMed ID
19492539 View in PubMed
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Association of stress and depression with chronic facial pain: A case-control study based on the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290457
Source
Cranio. 2017 May; 35(3):187-191
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Netta Nevalainen
Raija Lähdesmäki
Pirjo Mäki
Ellen Ek
Anja Taanila
Paula Pesonen
Kirsi Sipilä
Author Affiliation
a Institute of Dentistry , University of Oulu , Oulu , Finland.
Source
Cranio. 2017 May; 35(3):187-191
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Pain - etiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - complications - psychology
Facial Pain - etiology - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - complications - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim was to study the association between stress level and chronic facial pain, while controlling for the effect of depression on this association, during a three-year follow-up in a general population-based birth cohort.
In the general population-based Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort, information about stress level, depression and facial pain were collected using questionnaires at the age of 31 years. Stress level was measured using the Work Ability Index. Depression was assessed using the 13-item depression subscale in the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25. Three years later, a subsample of 52 subjects (42 women) with chronic facial pain and 52 pain-free controls (42 women) was formed.
Of the subjects having high stress level at baseline, 73.3% had chronic facial pain, and 26.7% were pain-free three years later. The univariate logistic regression analysis showed that high stress level at 31 years increased the risk for chronic facial pain (crude OR 6.1, 95%, CI 1.3-28.7) three years later. When including depression in a multivariate model, depression associated statistically significantly with chronic facial pain (adjusted OR 2.5, 95%, CI 1.0-5.8), whereas stress level did not (adjusted OR 2.3, 95%, CI 0.6-8.4).
High stress level is connected with increased risk for chronic facial pain. This association seems to mediate through depression.
PubMed ID
27324460 View in PubMed
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144 records – page 1 of 15.