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54 records – page 1 of 6.

[A 5-year series. Injuries in moped and motorcycle accidents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241814
Source
Lakartidningen. 1983 Jun 15;80(24):2514-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1983

The Balkan beam - Florsch├╝tz frame and its use during the Great War.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262792
Source
Int Orthop. 2014 Oct;38(10):2209-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Stella Fatovic-Ferencic
Marko Pecina
Source
Int Orthop. 2014 Oct;38(10):2209-13
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Croatia
External Fixators - history
Extremities - injuries - surgery
Fracture Fixation - history
Fractures, Bone - history - surgery
History, 20th Century
Humans
Orthopedics - history
Russia
Serbia
World War I
Abstract
We remember the military medical practice of Croatian surgeon, Vatroslav Florschütz (1879-1967), known for his invention of the traction frame for repositioning bone fracture fragments of the upper and lower extremities. The method, known as the Balkan frame / beam or Balkan splint, was introduced and published in 1911 and used in war medicine thereafter. The memory of this invention adds to our orthopaedic heritage and sheds light on its creator working under the most demanding war circumstances. On the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of World War I, reminiscence of Florschütz's war experience, his orthopaedic innovation and other innovations contributes to our understanding of human efforts to save lives and restore bodily function of the wounded during wars.
PubMed ID
24859899 View in PubMed
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Burn injuries in small children, a population-based study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29247
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2006 Feb;15(2):129-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Anna Carlsson
Giggi Udén
Anders Håkansson
Elisabeth Dejin Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Doctoral student, Department of Nursing, School of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden. anna.carlsson@hs.mah.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2006 Feb;15(2):129-34
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - statistics & numerical data
Age Distribution
Burns - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Causality
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Extremities - injuries
Female
Health services needs and demand
Hospitals, University - utilization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Injury Severity Score
Male
Parents - education
Population Surveillance
Primary Health Care - utilization
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES. The aim of this study was to describe characteristics in burn injuries in children (zero to six years old), consulting primary care and hospital-based care in Malmö, Sweden. Burn-injured children consulting the University Hospital or the 21 Health Centres, during year 1998 and year 2002, were included. BACKGROUND. Epidemiological studies of burns in children have mostly been hospital-based and the cases that never reached the hospital have been excluded. DESIGN. The study had a retroperspective design with data collected from medical records. METHODS. Chi-squared test was used to analyse differences in nominal data and cross tables were used to analyse the proportions between the characteristics of the injuries and sex, age and nationality. RESULTS. The burn-injured children were 148 and 80% of those were scalds, caused by hot liquid (71%) or hot food (29%). The greatest number was boys between one and two years old. Children to foreign born parents were more frequently affected and the extent of the injuries often larger. Almost all the accidents (96%) occurred in home environment, while a family member was next to the child. The Health Centres received more often children affected on hand/arm and by causes like hot food than the University Hospital. CONCLUSIONS. Our data demonstrate the importance of developing a programme for the prevention of paediatric scalds with education of family members to be aware of the danger. With present study the knowledge about the occurrence of injuries in scald accidents in children has become deeper. This knowledge may contribute to more individual adept child accident prevention programme, to use in the child health care.
PubMed ID
16422729 View in PubMed
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[Characteristic of combat trauma and treatment of gunshot fractures of long bones of the limbs].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184139
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2003 May;324(5):4-12, 80
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
N A Efimenko
V M Shapovalov
A K Dulaev
A M Baranovskii
V P Retunskikh
P A Ivanov
A V Dydykin
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2003 May;324(5):4-12, 80
Date
May-2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bones of Upper Extremity - injuries - surgery
Fracture Fixation
Fractures, Bone - surgery
Hospitals, Military
Humans
Leg Bones - injuries - surgery
Medical Records
Military Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Military Personnel
Quality of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Transportation of Patients
War
Wounds, Gunshot - surgery
Abstract
Treatment of the patients with gunshot fractures of extremity long bones is one of the main problems of field surgery. The complex study of medical records obtained from 718 servicemen with gunshot fractures of extremity long bones who participated in counter-terrorist operation in the Republic of Chechnia (1994-1996) allowed to evaluate character and severity of the injuries, content of the treatment measures conducted at the stages of medical evacuation. The peculiarities of fighting trauma were the following: the high frequency of combined (22.5%) and multiple (25.9%) injuries, the high share of multi-fragmentation and splintered (76.4%), intra-articular fractures (17.3%), the primary defects of bones (7.1%) and soft tissues (4.8%), the injuries of main vessels (12.1%) and nerves (18.5%). Owing to the short periods of evacuation to the stage of specialized medical care (up to 18.2 +/- 5.3 h), high share of preserving variant of primary surgical treatment (82.3%); high quality of medical immobilization at the expense of wide introduction of functionally stable external osteosynthesis (51.2% of the casualties) it was possible to improve the treatment results.
PubMed ID
12908396 View in PubMed
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[Characteristics of the sequelae to frostbite of the extremities]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51703
Source
Klin Khir. 1990;(3):22-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
V K Gusak
L G Anishchenko
I I Speranskii
S R Bogoslavskaia
Iu N Lavrukhin
V F Ablitsov
Source
Klin Khir. 1990;(3):22-3
Date
1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
English Abstract
Extremities - injuries
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Frostbite - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Male
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
At the burn centre in Donetsk, from 1979 to 1988, 236 sufferers with a III-IV degree frostbite of the extremities were treated. Operated on were 189 patients, who underwent necrectomy, amputation of the extremity and different types of skin plasty. Of these patients, 49.8% were recognized as invalids. After 1-10 years, all the patients after a III-IV degree frostbite of the extremities make complaints, require different types of treatment, 38.9%--the operative one. For timely and qualitative rehabilitation of this category of the sufferers, their prophylactic medical examination is necessary.
PubMed ID
2366416 View in PubMed
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Commercial logging fatalities in Ontario, 1986-1991.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210527
Source
Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 1996 Dec;17(4):299-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
R. West
M J Shkrum
J G Young
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Victoria Hospital, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 1996 Dec;17(4):299-304
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - mortality
Accidents, occupational - mortality
Adult
Aged
Craniocerebral Trauma - mortality
Extremities - injuries
Forestry
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Trauma - mortality
Ontario - epidemiology
Seasons
Thoracic Injuries - mortality
Abstract
Despite the economic importance and hazardous nature of commercial logging in various regions, few medical studies have examined fatalities in this industry. Data derived from the files of the Ontario Chief Coroner's Office revealed 52 deaths, all men, from 1986 to 1991 in the province of Ontario. Forty-four cases were accidents (age range 20-73 years; average, 44 years), the majority involving experienced loggers. Personal error resulting in preventable unsafe work practices was a factor in most accidents (n = 35; 79.5%). Almost one half of injured workers were struck by either dead or cut trees. Although the majority of cases occurred in remote areas, delayed medical attention as a factor contributing to death was uncommon. Many of the injuries were nonsurvivable and most victims (n = 33; 75%) were dead at the scene. Most deaths were caused by either head and neck injuries (n = 20; 45.5%), multiple trauma (n = 10; 23%), chest trauma only (n = 6; 13.5%), or mechanical asphyxia (n = 5; 11%). Blood alcohol was negative in 24 accident victims tested. Eight deaths (age range 42-52 years; average, 49 years) were due to cardiac causes, mainly ischemic heart disease. Disease may have contributed to two accidents.
PubMed ID
8947353 View in PubMed
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Comparison of four pain scales in patients with hip fracture or other lower limb trauma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137385
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2011 Apr;55(4):495-502
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
K A Leino
K S Kuusniemi
K K Lertola
K T Olkkola
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care, Emergency Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. kari.leino@tyks.fi
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2011 Apr;55(4):495-502
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Endpoint Determination
Female
Finland
Hip Fractures - complications - surgery
Humans
Lower Extremity - injuries - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - diagnosis - etiology
Pain Measurement - methods
Perioperative Period
Abstract
The applicability of the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) has been questioned in the assessment of pain in the elderly. We compared VAS with three other pain scales, Verbal Rating Scale (VRS), Red Wedge Scale (RWS) and Box Scale (BS), in hip fracture patients.
VAS, VRS, RWS and BS were compared in 140 analysable patients undergoing surgery, 70 with hip fracture and 70 with other lower limb trauma. Pain scores were recorded once a day, repeated after 10 min, for 4 subsequent days starting pre-operatively. The primary endpoint was the rate of successful pain measurements in hip fracture patients and 90% was chosen as a sufficient level for an applicable pain scale.
Age was different between the groups (hip fracture 78 ± 11, other trauma 49 ± 11 years, P
PubMed ID
21288225 View in PubMed
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The effect of wrist guard use on upper-extremity injuries in snowboarders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174211
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Jul 15;162(2):149-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2005
Author
Brent Hagel
I Barry Pless
Claude Goulet
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, Canada. brent.hagel@ualberta.ca
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Jul 15;162(2):149-56
Date
Jul-15-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Protective Devices
Risk-Taking
Skiing - injuries
Upper Extremity - injuries
Wounds and injuries - prevention & control
Wrist
Abstract
The objective of this investigation was to determine the effect of wrist guard use on all upper-extremity injuries in snowboarders. This matched case-control study was conducted at 19 ski areas in Quebec, Canada. Cases were 1,066 injured snowboarders who reported upper-extremity injuries to the ski patrol during the 2001-2002 season. Controls were 970 snowboarders with non-upper-extremity injuries who were matched to cases on ski area and the nearest date, age, and sex, in that order. The response rate was 71.8% (73.5% for cases and 70.1% for controls). Cases were compared with controls with regard to wrist guard use. The prevalence of wrist guard use among snowboarders with hand, wrist, or forearm injuries was 1.6%; for those with elbow, upper arm, or shoulder injuries, it was 6.3%; and for controls, it was 3.9%. Thus, wrist guard use reduced the risk of hand, wrist, or forearm injury by 85% (adjusted odds ratio = 0.15, 95% confidence interval: 0.05, 0.45). However, the adjusted odds ratio for elbow, upper arm, or shoulder injury was 2.35 (95% confidence interval: 0.70, 7.81). These results provide evidence that use of wrist guards reduces the risk of hand, wrist, and forearm injuries but may increase the risk of elbow, upper arm, and shoulder injuries.
PubMed ID
15972933 View in PubMed
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Electrical injuries in Canadian burn care. Identification of unsolved problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32754
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1999 Oct 30;888:75-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1999
Author
E E Tredget
H A Shankowsky
W A Tilley
Author Affiliation
Firefighters' Burn Treatment Unit, University of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1999 Oct 30;888:75-87
Date
Oct-30-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Burns, Electric - etiology - pathology - surgery
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Extremities - injuries
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Over the past decade, the Firefighters' Burn Treatment Unit of the University of Alberta Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, has treated 1399 inpatients suffering from thermal injury. Regional burn care is provided in a 10-bed intensive care unit with 18 plastic surgery reconstructive beds for a large referral region of central and northern Alberta, portions of the Northwest Territories, and neighboring provinces of British Columbia and Saskatchewan. Of the total burn inpatients during this period, 74 electrical injuries were treated (5.3% of all admissions): 71 were males (95.9%) and 3 females (4.1%). The mean age of all patients was 33.9 +/- 12.6 years (range 1-67). Compared to our general population of thermally injured patients, those with electrical injuries had smaller injuries [9.9 +/- 12.9% TBSA (range 1-65) versus 15.1 +/- 10.1], shorter length of hospitalization [18.6 +/- 7.3 days (range 1-80) versus 26.2 +/- 0.8], and substantially lower mortality once reaching the hospital (0% versus 4%). Electrical injuries were classified as flash in 30 cases, contact in 42 cases, and lightning in 2 cases; 74.3% of injuries occurred during work-related activities. A total of 118 operative procedures were performed during the acute admission (1.6 procedures per patient), including 19 amputations: 12 in the upper and 7 in the lower extremity. The mean time of amputation was 9.3 +/- 5.3 days after admission. In contact injuries of the upper extremity, 14 patients suffered amputations or neurologic injury that required reconstruction with free tissue transfers and nerve grafts. Long-term functional outcome of these patients using sensory testing, the Jebsen-Taylor hand function test, and wound coverage has revealed that these patients have substantial persistent sensory impairment of their upper extremities postinjury despite reconstruction, although many remain active and functional with acceptable wound coverage. Based on our analysis of electrical injury as it presents to one typical Canadian burn unit, our patients suffer limb loss on a delayed basis, which leads to substantial morbidity. Reconstruction of the upper extremity with microsurgical techniques after profound electrical injury has provided acceptable coverage, but in many instances is associated with poor or marginal sensory recovery limiting reemployment options for patients with upper extremity electrical burns. Further understanding of the cellular biology of delayed tissue loss after electric injury would offer the potential for reduction in amputation rate and improvement in functional outcome and overall morbidity.
PubMed ID
10842620 View in PubMed
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Fractures and dislocations of the extremities in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249951
Source
J Trauma. 1977 May;17(5):351-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1977
Author
M H Reed
Source
J Trauma. 1977 May;17(5):351-4
Date
May-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Dislocations - epidemiology
Extremities - injuries
Female
Femoral Fractures - epidemiology
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Hand Injuries - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Manitoba
Pelvic Bones - injuries
Radius Fractures - epidemiology
Seasons
Sex Factors
Abstract
A prospective study of 410 fractures seen in 398 children during 1 year was carried out. Fractures were more common on the left, and the upper extremities were more frequently injured than the lower extremities. The two commonest sites were the hand and the distal forearm. The radius was the bone most commonly fractured. Fifty-seven (13.9%) of the fractures involved epiphyses and 67 (16.3%) were torus fractures. Of the 398 patients 236 were males. There was a slightly increased incidence of fractures in the summer months and in older patients.
PubMed ID
859186 View in PubMed
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54 records – page 1 of 6.