Skip header and navigation

Refine By

117 records – page 1 of 12.

[Accidental explosions in Denmark when working on containers for combustible fluids]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38214
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Jan 30;151(5):305-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-1989
Author
B. Bak
M. Juhl
M. Mikkelsen
F. Lauridsen
J. Pilegaard
N D Røck
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Jan 30;151(5):305-7
Date
Jan-30-1989
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Child
Denmark
English Abstract
Explosions
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
Gases may be formed in containers for inflammable fluids and these may burn explosively if lit. Even apparently empty containers may contain sufficient quantities of gas to result in violent explosions precipitated by procedures which produce heat or sparks in the neighbourhood of the container. Seventeen persons were found to be injured in accidents of this type in a Danish investigation. Two of the accidental injuries proved fatal. The serious risk involved in handling and treating containers which contain or have contained inflammable fluids is, therefore, emphasized.
PubMed ID
2919448 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Accidents with home-made metal-tube fireworks].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228015
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Nov 12;152(46):3466-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-12-1990
Author
H M Andersen
T. Lind
Author Affiliation
Ortopaedkirurgisk afdeling, Haderslev Sygehus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Nov 12;152(46):3466-7
Date
Nov-12-1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blast Injuries - etiology - radiography - surgery
Denmark
Explosions - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Finger Injuries - etiology - radiography - surgery
Humans
Male
Abstract
At the turn of the year 1988/89, injuries caused by home-made fireworks were treated in the orthopaedic-surgical casualty department. Four accidents are described. Construction and use of home-made fireworks are warned against.
PubMed ID
2238242 View in PubMed
Less detail

[ACOUSTIC TRAUMA DUE TO FIRWORKS DIAGNOSED BY EAR SPECIALISTS IN THE PROVINCE.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45235
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1964 Dec 10;126:1689-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-1964
Author
P O JENSEN
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1964 Dec 10;126:1689-92
Date
Dec-10-1964
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Audiometry
Child
Deafness
Denmark
Explosions
Geriatrics
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced
PubMed ID
14257977 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute posttraumatic stress: nonacceptance of early intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71884
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2001;62 Suppl 17:35-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
L. Weisaeth
Author Affiliation
Division of Disaster Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Norway. lars.weisath@psykiatri.uio.no
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2001;62 Suppl 17:35-40
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Acute Disease
Adaptation, Psychological
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cooperative Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dreams - psychology
Explosions - statistics & numerical data
False Negative Reactions
False Positive Reactions
Fear - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Mass Screening - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Sleep Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Social Isolation - psychology
Startle Reaction - physiology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Psychological resistance may be of considerable importance in the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) population, considering that researchers in the field of traumatic stress are frequently unsuccessful in achieving high response rates, that many subjects suffering from PTSD never seek help, and that dropouts from therapy are frequent. This article presents data on the main complaints reported in the acute aftermath of an industrial disaster by 246 employees who had been exposed to the disaster. The dominant concerns were symptomatic complaints related to posttraumatic stress reactions rather than external problems. Sleep disturbance, anxiety/fear responses, and physical symptoms were reported by individuals with complaints in the acute phase as most problematic, while irritability and depressive symptoms appeared very infrequently among the reported main complaints. A high specificity and sensitivity were achieved in predicting later PTSD (as defined by DSM-III criteria) by applying early response variables: thus, there were few false-positives and false-negatives. There was a considerable overlap between the PTSD predictors and the main symptom complaints. From a prevention point of view, this should be advantageous, since it would bring the right people to seek help. However, in a significant proportion of the acutely distressed, the reluctance to seek help was motivated by the very symptoms that predicted PTSD. Even a relatively high rate of subjects agreeing to be screened (82.8%) would have lost 42% of those who qualified for a diagnosis of PTSD, and more than half of the subjects with severe outcomes would not have been included. For primary and secondary prevention, the findings suggest that early screening and outreach should be very active.
PubMed ID
11495094 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addressing the burden of post-conflict surgical disease - strategies from the North Caucasus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135930
Source
Glob Public Health. 2011;6(6):669-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Karsten Lunze
Fatima I Lunze
Author Affiliation
Preventive Medicine, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA. karsten.lunze@post.harvard.edu
Source
Glob Public Health. 2011;6(6):669-77
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altruism
Blast Injuries - complications - psychology - surgery
Capacity Building - methods
Child
Disaster Planning - methods - standards
Ear, Middle - injuries - surgery
Explosions
General Surgery - manpower
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
International Cooperation
Needs Assessment
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Prisoners - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Schools
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Terrorism
War
Abstract
The 2004 terror attack on a school in Beslan, North Caucasus, with more than 1300 children and their families taken hostage and 334 people killed, ended after extreme violence. Following the disaster, many survivors with blast ear injuries developed complications because no microsurgery services were available in the region. Here, we present our strategies in North Ossetia to strengthen subspecialty surgical care in a region of instable security conditions. Disaster modifies disease burden in an environment of conflict-related health-care limitations. We built on available secondary care and partnered international with local stakeholders to reach and treat victims of a humanitarian disaster. A strategy of mutual commitment resulted in treatment of all consenting Beslan victims with blast trauma sequelae and of non disaster-related patients. Credible, sustained partnerships and needs assessments beyond the immediate phases after a disaster are essential to facilitate a meaningful transition from humanitarian aid to capacity building exceeding existing insufficient standards. Psychosocial impacts of disaster might constitute a barrier to care and need to be assessed when responding to the burden of surgical disease in conflict or post-conflict settings. Involving local citizen groups in the planning process can be useful to identify and access vulnerable populations. Integration of our strategy into broader efforts might strengthen the local health system through management and leadership.
PubMed ID
21432701 View in PubMed
Less detail

The aftermath of an industrial disaster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209965
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1997;392:1-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
A. Elklit
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychology, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1997;392:1-25
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Asphyxia - psychology
Blast Injuries - psychology
Burns - psychology
Crisis Intervention
Denmark
Explosions
Female
Humans
Industry
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Relief Work
Ships
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Abstract
An explosion in a Danish supertanker under construction in 1994 caused the death of six workers and injured 15. Six months later 270 workers took part in this study, which analyses the relationships between objective stressors, the workers' own feelings and the reactions of their families after the explosion together with training, attitude to the workplace, general out-look, and received crisis help. Traumatisation, coping style and crisis support was assessed via the Impact of Event Scale (IES), the Coping Styles Questionnaire (CSQ) and the Crisis Support Scale (CSS). Emotionally, workers and their families were strongly affected by the explosion. The IES-score was 17.6 and the invasion score 9.1. The degree of traumatisation was higher in the group who had an 'audience position' than in the group who was directly hit by the explosion. Training in rescue work did not protect against adverse effects. Rescue work had a strong impact on the involved. Social support was a significant factor, that seems to buffer negative effects. High level of social integration, effective leadership in the situation, and professional crisis intervention characterised the disaster situation. All the same, 41 per cent of the workers reached the caseness criteria by Horowitz (IES > or = 19).
PubMed ID
9284976 View in PubMed
Less detail

Airway symptoms and lung function among male workers in an area polluted from an oil tank explosion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267816
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2014 Sep;56(9):953-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Jens-Tore Granslo
Magne Bråtveit
Bjørg Eli Hollund
Stein Håkon Låstad Lygre
Cecilie Svanes
Bente Elisabeth Moen
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2014 Sep;56(9):953-8
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Explosions
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Humans
Lung Diseases - chemically induced
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Petroleum - adverse effects
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory System
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess whether working in an industrial harbor where an oil tank exploded was associated with more airway symptoms and lower lung function in men 1.5 years later.
In a cross-sectional study of 180 men, 18 to 67 years old, airway symptoms and lung function among men who worked in the industrial harbor at the time of the explosion was compared with those of working men with residence more than 20 km away. Regression analyses are adjusted for smoking, occupational exposure, atopy, recent infection, and age.
Exposed men had significantly more upper (ORirritated nose = 2.89 [95% confidence interval = 1.31 to 6.37]) and lower (ORdyspnea uphill = 3.79 [95% confidence interval = 1.69 to 8.46]) airway symptoms, and some indication of more reversible airway obstruction than unexposed workers.
Men working in an area with an oil tank explosion had more airway symptoms and indication of more airway obstruction 1.5 years after the event.
PubMed ID
25153304 View in PubMed
Less detail

Airway symptoms and lung function in the local population after the oil tank explosion in Gulen, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118172
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2012;12:76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jens-Tore Granslo
Magne Bråtveit
Bjørg Eli Hollund
Ågot Irgens
Cecilie Svanes
Nils Magerøy
Bente Elisabeth Moen
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. jens-tore.granslo@helse-bergen.no
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2012;12:76
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Explosions
Female
Humans
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Respiration Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Spirometry
Abstract
Oil tanks containing a mixture of hydrocarbons, including sulphuric compounds, exploded and caught fire in an industrial harbour. This study assesses airway symptoms and lung function in the nearby population 1½ years after the explosion.
A cross-sectional study included individuals =18 years old. Individuals living 20 km away formed a control group. A questionnaire and spirometry tests were completed by 223 exposed individuals (response rate men 70%, women 75%) and 179 control individuals (response rate men 51%, women 65%). Regression analyses included adjustment for smoking, occupational exposure, atopy, infection in the preceding month and age. Analyses of symptoms were also adjusted for stress reactions related to the accident.
Exposed individuals experienced significantly more blocked nose (odds ratio 1.7 [95% confidence interval 1.0, 2.8]), rhinorrhoea (1.6 [1.1, 3.3]), nose irritation (3.4 [2.0, 5.9]), sore throat (3.1 [1.8, 5.5]), morning cough (3.5 [2.0, 5.5]), daily cough (2.2 [1.4, 3.7]), cough >3 months a year (2.9 [1.5, 5.3]) and cough with phlegm (1.9 [1.2, 3.1]) than control individuals. A significantly increasing trend was found for nose symptoms and cough, depending on the proximity of home address to explosion site (daily cough, 3-6km 1.8 [1.0, 3.1],
Notes
Cites: Clin Physiol. 2001 Nov;21(6):648-6011722472
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(5):426-3219688636
Cites: Behav Res Ther. 2003 Dec;41(12):1489-9614705607
Cites: BMJ. 1993 Nov 13;307(6914):1251-58281057
Cites: BMJ. 1994 Sep 24;309(6957):773-47950562
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1995 Sep;152(3):1107-367663792
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1997 Jul;100(1):16-229257782
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 1999 Mar;15(3):293-910395061
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1999 May;53(5):306-1010396538
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1999 Jul-Aug;54(4):254-6310433184
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2004 Nov;114(5):1116-2315536419
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2005 Apr;113(4):406-1115811830
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 2005;27:107-1415958431
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2005 Aug;26(2):319-3816055882
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Sep 15;162(6):499-50716107572
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2005 Nov;26(5):948-6816264058
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Sep 15;176(6):532-5517507545
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Sep 15;176(6):610-617556713
Cites: Addict Behav. 2008 Aug;33(8):1039-4718501524
Cites: Thorax. 2009 Aug;64(8):657-6319359266
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2009 Oct;35(5):368-7519436923
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2009 Dec;35(6):454-6119806271
Cites: Psychol Methods. 2009 Dec;14(4):349-6619968397
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2010 Oct 19;153(8):489-9820733177
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2002 Jul;44(7):601-512134522
PubMed ID
23234609 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Alcohols--dangerous igniting fluids]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13244
Source
Lakartidningen. 1975 Dec 3;72(49):4874-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-3-1975
Author
H. Nordström
B. Nylén
Source
Lakartidningen. 1975 Dec 3;72(49):4874-5
Date
Dec-3-1975
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Burns, Chemical - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Explosions
Humans
Male
Methanol
Sweden
PubMed ID
1195931 View in PubMed
Less detail

117 records – page 1 of 12.