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Anders Sparrman and his translation of Rosén von Rosenstein's textbook on children's diseases during Captain Cook's expedition to the antarctic regions and round the world (1772-1775).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41982
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1977 May;66(3):269-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1977
Source
Med J Aust. 1975 Aug 23;2(8):295-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-23-1975
Author
D J Lugg
Source
Med J Aust. 1975 Aug 23;2(8):295-8
Date
Aug-23-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia, Inhalation - history
Antarctic Regions
Appendicitis - history
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning - history
Cold Climate
Equipment and Supplies
Expeditions - history
Frostbite - history - surgery
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - history
Physicians - supply & distribution
Scurvy - history - prevention & control
Toes - surgery
Transportation of Patients
Abstract
An historical review is made of Antarctic medical practice, which is unique because of the absence of an indigenous population. This review begins with the primitive shipboard practice of doctors accompanying Captain James Cook around 1775 and concludes with the modern era of permanent stations and vast scientific endeavour. The heroic era of Scott, Shackleton, Amundsen and Mawson and the highly mechanized transition period are contrasted with the present day. Medical practice on modern expeditions has reached a high standard, but there is still much to be learned concerning human adaptation. Comment is made on the possible utilization of Antarctica's natural resources bringing increases in polar populations and facilitating the expansion of medical research in the future era of polar medicine.
PubMed ID
1101002 View in PubMed
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Bob Marshall, Part II: Exploring the Koyukuk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201186
Source
Wilderness Environ Med. 1999;10(2):117-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
B C Paton
Author Affiliation
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, USA.
Source
Wilderness Environ Med. 1999;10(2):117-24
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Expeditions - history
Forestry - history
Fresh Water
History, 20th Century
Humans
Mountaineering - history
PubMed ID
10442161 View in PubMed
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A brief history of the discovery of tick-borne encephalitis virus in the late 1930s (based on reminiscences of members of the expeditions, their colleagues, and relatives).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291898
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2017 10; 8(6):813-820
Publication Type
Biography
Historical Article
Journal Article
Portraits
Review
Date
10-2017
Author
Vladimir I Zlobin
Vanda V Pogodina
Olaf Kahl
Author Affiliation
Irkutsk State Medical University, Ministry of Public Health of Russian Federation, Irkutsk, Krasnogo Vosstaniya Str. 1, 664003, Russian Federation.
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2017 10; 8(6):813-820
Date
10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Biography
Historical Article
Journal Article
Portraits
Review
Keywords
Animals
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - physiology
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - history - transmission
Entomology - history
Expeditions - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Ixodes - virology
Siberia
USSR
Virology - history
Abstract
Tick-borne encephalitis virus is the etiological agent of a severe human disease transmitted by hard ticks. It occurs in large parts of eastern, central, and western Asia and in Europe with thousands of human cases each year. Here, the discovery of the virus by Soviet scientists in the late 1930s in the Far East is described. The pioneering work involved with this discovery, which resulted in great scientific and epidemiological achievement, was undertaken under the most difficult conditions, and some of the scientists and their technical assistants paid for it with their health and even their lives. This paper briefly outlines the steps on the way that elucidated the basic etiology and eco-epidemiology of the disease, and does not omit that, as one result of the expeditions and the political situation in the former Soviet Union at that time, some scientists were sent to prison.
PubMed ID
28526419 View in PubMed
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[Early encounters of German-language explorers with the Tibetan medicine in Siberia in the modern era].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122907
Source
Forsch Komplementmed. 2012;19(3):143-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Natalia Surkova
Galina V Chekhirova
Tamara Aseeva
Sergey Nikolaev
Grigori Agalzew
Jörg Melzer
Cécile Vennos
Herbert Schwabl
Reinhard Saller
Author Affiliation
IOEB SO RAN, Forschungsinstitut für allgemeine und experimentelle Biologie der Russischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Ulan-Ude, Russland.
Source
Forsch Komplementmed. 2012;19(3):143-52
Date
2012
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Culture
Europe
Expeditions - history
Germany
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
Humans
Medicine, Tibetan Traditional - history
Siberia
Abstract
The spreading of Tibetan Buddhism and with it the Tibetan medicine in the region east of Lake Baikal, goes back to the 17th century. At the beginning of the 18th century, German speaking scholars were among the first to undertake scientific expeditions through Siberia. As such they were amongst the first scientists of the modern era who encountered the traditions, concepts, and therapeutic methods of Tibetan medicine. The aim of this article is to describe and analyze these first encounters with Tibetan medicine by the example of selected men of science of the 18th and 19th century. This work is based on extensive studies of sources in archives and libraries in Russia and Switzerland. We found documents related to the following scientists: Daniel Gottlieb Messerschmidt (1685-1735), Johann Georg Gmelin (1709-1755), Erik Laxmann (1737-1796), Friedrich Adelung (1768-1843), and Joseph Rehmann (1779-1831). They mentioned the distribution of Tibetan medicine within Russia, the use of medicinal plants and formulas as well as therapeutic techniques. For the scientific community of the time these first encounters of Europeans with practitioners of Tibetan medicine could not lift Tibetan medicine out of other exotic context in the field of ethnography. For today's researchers, these encounters are an important evidence for more than 300 years of development of Tibetan medicine on the vast territory of Siberia. The practice and the scientific examination of Tibetan medicine in Siberia is an active endeavor until today. The present work shows that it is possible and rewarding to follow up the historic and cultural connections from Europe to Asia via the Siberian link.
PubMed ID
22759729 View in PubMed
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Glimpses of Alaskan medical history. A bloody skirmish in Kotzebue Sound (1827).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225617
Source
Alaska Med. 1991 Oct-Dec;33(4):174
Publication Type
Article
Source
Alaska Med. 1991 Oct-Dec;33(4):174
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Expeditions - history
History, 19th Century
Humans
Inuits - history
Wounds, Stab - history
PubMed ID
1816737 View in PubMed
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[Hypothermia was the most probable cause of death of men in the Andree expedition]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57265
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Jan 31;98(5):475-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-2001
Source
Endeavour. 2006 Mar;30(1):36-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Nielsen Kristian Hvidtfelt
Author Affiliation
The Steno Institute, University of Aarhus, Ny Munkegade, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. khn@si.au.dk
Source
Endeavour. 2006 Mar;30(1):36-40
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Expeditions - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Marine Biology - history
Mythology
Natural History - history
Oceans and Seas
Abstract
The sea monster played an important part in launching the Danish Galathea Deep Sea Expedition of 1950-1952. Part scientific object, part media darling and part fundraising strategy, the sea monster brought scientists, journalists and politicians together in support of the expedition. The scientific leader of the expedition, Anton F. Bruun, contended the scientific reality of such a creature; the leader of the press section attached to the expedition, Hakon Mielche, dreamt of the grand headlines finding the sea monster would attract; and everyone involved used the 'poor little thing' to promote the expedition to sponsors and in public.
PubMed ID
16455137 View in PubMed
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32 records – page 1 of 4.