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112 records – page 1 of 12.

A 1-year, three-couple expedition as a crew analog for a Mars mission.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31234
Source
Environ Behav. 2002 Sep;34(5):672-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Gloria R Leon
Mera M Atlis
Deniz S Ones
Graeme Magor
Author Affiliation
Clinical Psychology, University of Minnesota, USA.
Source
Environ Behav. 2002 Sep;34(5):672-700
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Arctic Regions
Astronauts - psychology
Canada
Child
Cold Climate
Darkness
Expeditions
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mars
Norway
Personality
Personnel Selection
Questionnaires
Social Isolation
Space Simulation
Spouses - psychology
Abstract
This study assessed the intrapersonal and interpersonal functioning of a three-couple expedition group that included a 2 1/2-year-old child which was ice-locked on a boat in the High Arctic during a major portion of the expedition. Personality assessment indicated that team members were generally well adjusted, scoring relatively higher on well-being and achievement and relatively lower on stress reactivity. Weekly mood ratings showed that the group exhibited significantly higher positive than negative affect. Reported negative events were relatively most frequent at the beginning of the Arctic stay and toward the end of the darkness period and were lowest during the initial darkness interval. The period of darkness had both a salutary and negative impact. A highly important means of coping with stress was seeking emotional support from one's partner. Selection of couples with strong bonds with their partner appears to be one viable approach for crew selection for long-duration missions.
PubMed ID
12481801 View in PubMed
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[24-h profile of arterial pressure in hypertensive patients working in rotatory teams in conditions of Far North (Tyumen Region)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5525
Source
Ter Arkh. 2005;77(1):41-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
L I Gapon
N P Shurkevich
A S Vetoshkin
Source
Ter Arkh. 2005;77(1):41-5
Date
2005
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Autonomic Nervous System - physiopathology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Circadian Rhythm - physiology
Cold Climate
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Expeditions
Female
Humans
Hypertension - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Russia
Abstract
AIM: To specify a 24-h profile of arterial pressure (AP) in hypertensive patients working in duty regime in the Far North (Tyumen Region). MATERIAL AND METHODS: AP parameters were studied in 155 males aged 25-59 with hypertension of stage I, II who were employed for duty work in the Far North areas and 38 control patients with hypertension stage I, II living in a moderate climatic zone (Tyumen). The groups were comparable by gender, age, duration of hypertension, office systolic and diastolic AP (SAP and DAP). All the patients have undergone 24-h monitoring of AP with assessment of basic mean parameters. RESULTS: The study group patients had scare symptoms and lower mean 24-h SAP, but high AP variability, high DAD as reflection of more significant structural changes of vessels and special functioning of the autonomic nervous system in the North. Mean 24-h AP showed more unfavourable changes in hypertensive subjects who had flight from Yamburg-Moscow-Yamburg. CONCLUSION: The data of the study dictate the necessity to develop a differentiated risk strategy for health promotion, prevention and treatment of hypertension in those who work in the North of Tyumen Region in duty regime.
PubMed ID
15759453 View in PubMed
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[Adaptation capabilities of polar explorers in Antarctic mountains].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300693
Source
Kosmicheskaia Biologiia i Aviakosmicheskaia Meditsina. 1987 Nov-Dec;21(6):62-6.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
Aidaraliev AA
Maksimov AL
Chernook TB
Source
Kosmicheskaia Biologiia i Aviakosmicheskaia Meditsina. 1987 Nov-Dec;21(6):62-6.
Date
1987
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Antarctic Regions
Circadian Rhythm
Expeditions
Humans
Hypoxia/physiopathology
Mountaineering
Seasons
Abstract
The examinations were carried out during the 27th Soviet Antarctic expedition. Baseline data were collected before the departure of the test subjects to the Antarctic Region. Prior to their ascent to the high mountain area they were divided into two groups with a high and a low level of hypoxic tolerance in terms of the work capacity index calculated on the basis of standard bicycle ergometry tests. Heart rate, body temperature and salivary content of sodium and potassium were measured 6 times a day at 4-hour intervals. The results obtained were treated by nonparametric tests. It was found that on adaptation day 30 the subjects with low hypoxic tolerance and nonspecific resistance developed changes in biorhythm amplitudes and phases and showed ultradian components with a 12-hour period. By contrast, the subjects with high hypoxic tolerance retained the ability to maintain circadian patterns. By the middle of the wintering time the circadian rhythms shifted towards ultradian components regardless of individual hypoxic tolerance.
PubMed ID
3437743 View in PubMed
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Anders Sparrman and his translation of Rosén von Rosenstein's textbook on children's diseases during Captain Cook's expedition to the antarctic regions and round the world (1772-1775).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41982
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1977 May;66(3):269-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1977
Source
Med J Aust. 1975 Aug 23;2(8):295-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-23-1975
Author
D J Lugg
Source
Med J Aust. 1975 Aug 23;2(8):295-8
Date
Aug-23-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia, Inhalation - history
Antarctic Regions
Appendicitis - history
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning - history
Cold Climate
Equipment and Supplies
Expeditions - history
Frostbite - history - surgery
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - history
Physicians - supply & distribution
Scurvy - history - prevention & control
Toes - surgery
Transportation of Patients
Abstract
An historical review is made of Antarctic medical practice, which is unique because of the absence of an indigenous population. This review begins with the primitive shipboard practice of doctors accompanying Captain James Cook around 1775 and concludes with the modern era of permanent stations and vast scientific endeavour. The heroic era of Scott, Shackleton, Amundsen and Mawson and the highly mechanized transition period are contrasted with the present day. Medical practice on modern expeditions has reached a high standard, but there is still much to be learned concerning human adaptation. Comment is made on the possible utilization of Antarctica's natural resources bringing increases in polar populations and facilitating the expansion of medical research in the future era of polar medicine.
PubMed ID
1101002 View in PubMed
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[Anton Chekhov on the island of Sachalin (author's transl)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49482
Source
MMW Munch Med Wochenschr. 1974 Mar 29;116(13):667-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-29-1974

[A polar expedition in challenging circumstances--experiences and psychological reactions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6021
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Dec 23;123(24):3524-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-23-2003
Author
Siri Steine
Kjetil Steine
Gunnar Sandbaek
Arne G Røseth
Author Affiliation
Markveien legesenter, Grüners gate 8, 0515 Oslo. s.steine@online.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Dec 23;123(24):3524-8
Date
Dec-23-2003
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Anxiety - diagnosis
Arctic Regions
Bonding, Human-Pet
Cold Climate
Dogs
English Abstract
Expeditions
Health status
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
Four men, in the company of 16 dogs, skied for five weeks from Gåsefjord to Ellef Ringnes Land, North Canada. The expedition met with considerable unforeseen challenges such as extreme and prolonged cold, unmotivated Greenland dogs, and much pack ice. Psychological reactions were described and measured by a qualitative free text analysis and a test battery including GHQ-30 (General Health Questionnaire) and STAI State (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) before, during, and after the expedition. Five main themes were found: external influences, relations between men and animals, progress and expectations, interpersonal relations, and thoughts at the end of the expedition. Negative emotional reactions were mostly present at the beginning of the expedition and were related to the environment and the pressure of perceived expectations from the outside world. Frustrations were enhanced by forced inactivity. Perceived essential positive elements were a strong group identity and friendship. The acceptance of dissension was low; the group strived to achieve consensus before decisions were made. The psychometric results showed more stress and anxiety immediately before the expedition than after. These parameters also increased significantly at the beginning of the expedition, then there was a reverse. The level of anxiety was higher in the two leaders. The expedition was concluded in an overall atmosphere of mutual affection, satisfaction, and pride.
PubMed ID
14691490 View in PubMed
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112 records – page 1 of 12.