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A 10-week strength training program: effect on the motor performance of an unimpaired upper extremity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50029
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1998 Aug;79(8):925-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
K J Kauranen
P T Siira
H V Vanharanta
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Oulu University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1998 Aug;79(8):925-30
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arm - physiology
Electromyography
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Motor Skills - physiology
Movement - physiology
Weight Lifting
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Muscle strength training is one of the most common therapy methods in physical therapy programs, and the usual goal of this treatment is to improve muscle strength. Little attention has been paid, however, to the effects of strength training on the other components of motor performance. This study examined the effects of a 10-week strength training program on the motor performance of the hand, including reaction time, speed of movement, tapping speed, and coordination in normal healthy volunteers. DESIGN: Before-after trial. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: Sixteen healthy women volunteers aged 25 to 45 years participated. INTERVENTION: Subjects accomplished a 10-week muscle strength training program of the upper extremities. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Reaction time, speed of movement, tapping speed, and coordination were measured three times on consecutive days, and muscle strength and electromyographic values of the right upper extremity were recorded once before the training period. After the training period, the same measurements were made as before the training. RESULTS: The 10-week strength training decreased choice reaction time by 6% (p
PubMed ID
9710164 View in PubMed
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A 24-week dietary and physical activity lifestyle intervention reduces hepatic insulin resistance in the obese with chronic hepatitis C.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117638
Source
Liver Int. 2013 Mar;33(3):410-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Venessa Pattullo
Andres Duarte-Rojo
Wael Soliman
Florencia Vargas-Vorackova
Sanjeev Sockalingam
Ivan G Fantus
Johane Allard
Jenny Heathcote
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Liver Int. 2013 Mar;33(3):410-9
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Basal Metabolism
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Hepatitis C, Chronic - complications - pathology
Humans
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Obesity - complications - diet therapy - therapy
Ontario
Prospective Studies
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Obesity- and virus-mediated insulin resistance (IR) are associated with adverse hepatic and metabolic outcomes in chronic hepatitis C (CHC). This study evaluates the tolerability and effects of a dietary and physical activity (PA) intervention in obese patients with insulin-resistant CHC.
Obese patients (body mass index, BMI =30 kg/m(2) ) with CHC were recruited prospectively. Non-diabetic patients with IR (homeostasis model assessment of IR, HOMA-IR >2.0) proceeded to a 24-week lifestyle intervention comprising pedometer monitored increase in PA (=10 000 steps/day) and an individualised dietary plan.
Ten non-cirrhotic and six cirrhotic patients [age 52 ± 8.5 years, BMI 35.9 (31.46-38.21)kg/m(2) ] were recruited, of whom all 16 (100%) completed the 24-week protocol. Increase in PA from 6853 (2440-9533) to 10 697 (7959-13566) steps/day (P = 0.001) and reduction in caloric intake from 2263 (1805.4-2697.0) to 1281 (1099.5-1856.3) kcal/day (equivalent to reduction of median 33% (25.3-49.8%), P
PubMed ID
23278982 View in PubMed
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ACL injury incidence in female handball 10 years after the Norwegian ACL prevention study: important lessons learned.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116381
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2013 May;47(8):476-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Grethe Myklebust
Arnhild Skjølberg
Roald Bahr
Author Affiliation
Oslo Sport Trauma Research Center, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Department of Sports Medicine, Oslo, Norway. grethe.myklebust@nih.no
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2013 May;47(8):476-9
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anterior Cruciate Ligament - injuries
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Norway
Track and Field - injuries
PubMed ID
23403528 View in PubMed
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Acute hamstring injuries in Swedish elite sprinters and jumpers: a prospective randomised controlled clinical trial comparing two rehabilitation protocols.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258296
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2014 Apr;48(7):532-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Carl M Askling
Magnus Tengvar
Olga Tarassova
Alf Thorstensson
Author Affiliation
The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, , Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2014 Apr;48(7):532-9
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Athletic Injuries - rehabilitation
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Muscle, Skeletal - injuries
Prospective Studies
Recovery of Function - physiology
Running - injuries
Sprains and Strains - rehabilitation
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Hamstring strain is a common injury in sprinters and jumpers, and therefore time to return to sport and secondary prevention become of particular concern.
To compare the effectiveness of two rehabilitation protocols after acute hamstring injury in Swedish elite sprinters and jumpers by evaluating time needed to return to full participation in the training process.
Prospective randomised comparison of two rehabilitation protocols.
Fifty-six Swedish elite sprinters and jumpers with acute hamstring injury, verified by MRI, were randomly assigned to one of two rehabilitation protocols. Twenty-eight athletes were assigned to a protocol emphasising lengthening exercises, L-protocol, and 28 athletes to a protocol consisting of conventional exercises, C-protocol. The outcome measure was the number of days to return to full training. Re-injuries were registered during a period of 12 months after return.
Time to return was significantly shorter for the athletes in the L-protocol, mean 49 days (1SD±26, range 18-107 days), compared with the C-protocol, mean 86 days (1SD±34, range 26-140 days). Irrespective of protocol, hamstring injuries where the proximal free tendon was involved took a significantly longer time to return than injuries that did not involve the free tendon, L-protocol: mean 73 vs 31 days and C-protocol: mean 116 vs 63 days, respectively. Two reinjuries were registered, both in the C-protocol.
A rehabilitation protocol emphasising lengthening type of exercises is more effective than a protocol containing conventional exercises in promoting time to return in Swedish elite sprinters and jumpers.
PubMed ID
24620041 View in PubMed
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Aerobic interval training increases peak oxygen uptake more than usual care exercise training in myocardial infarction patients: a randomized controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131098
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2012 Jan;26(1):33-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Trine Moholdt
Inger Lise Aamot
Ingrid Granøien
Lisbeth Gjerde
Gitte Myklebust
Liv Walderhaug
Line Brattbakk
Torstein Hole
Torbjørn Graven
Tomas O Stølen
Brage H Amundsen
Harald Edvard Mølmen-Hansen
Asbjørn Støylen
Ulrik Wisløff
Stig A Slørdahl
Author Affiliation
KG Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Trondheim, Norway. trine.moholdt@ntnu.no
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2012 Jan;26(1):33-44
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - rehabilitation
Norway
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Quality of Life
Abstract
Exercise capacity strongly predicts survival and aerobic interval training (AIT) increases peak oxygen uptake effectively in cardiac patients. Usual care in Norway provides exercise training at the hospitals following myocardial infarction (MI), but the effect and actual intensity of these rehabilitation programmes are unknown.
Randomized controlled trial.
Hospital cardiac rehabilitation.
One hundred and seven patients, recruited two to 12 weeks after MI, were randomized to usual care rehabilitation or treadmill AIT.
Usual care aerobic group exercise training or treadmill AIT as 4?×?4 minutes intervals at 85-95% of peak heart rate. Twice weekly exercise training for 12 weeks.
The primary outcome measure was peak oxygen uptake. Secondary outcome measures were endothelial function, blood markers of cardiovascular disease, quality of life, resting heart rate, and heart rate recovery.
Eighty-nine patients (74 men, 15 women, 57.4?±?9.5 years) completed the programme. Peak oxygen uptake increased more (P?=?0.002) after AIT (from 31.6?±?5.8 to 36.2?±?8.6?mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), P?
PubMed ID
21937520 View in PubMed
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Aerobic interval training reduces cardiovascular risk factors more than a multitreatment approach in overweight adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92670
Source
Clin Sci (Lond). 2009 Feb;116(4):317-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Tjønna Arnt E
Stølen Tomas O
Bye Anja
Volden Marte
Slørdahl Stig A
Odegård Rønnaug
Skogvoll Eirik
Wisløff Ulrik
Author Affiliation
Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Clin Sci (Lond). 2009 Feb;116(4):317-26
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Body Composition
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Combined Modality Therapy
Diet
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Obesity - complications - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Overweight - complications - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Oxygen consumption
Patient compliance
Risk factors
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of a multidisciplinary approach (MTG) and aerobic interval training (AIT) on cardiovascular risk factors in overweight adolescents. A total of 62 overweight and obese adolescents from Trøndelag County in Norway, referred to medical treatment at St Olav's Hospital, Trondheim, Norway, were invited to participate. Of these, 54 adolescents (age, 14.0 +/- 0.3 years) were randomized to either AIT (4 x 4 min intervals at 90% of maximal heart rate, each interval separated by 3 min at 70%, twice a week for 3 months) or to MTG (exercise, dietary and psychological advice, twice a month for 12 months). Follow-up testing occurred at 3 and 12 months. VO(2max) (maximal oxygen uptake) increased more after AIT compared with MTG, both at 3 months (11 compared with 0%; P
Notes
Comment In: Clin Sci (Lond). 2009 Feb;116(4):315-619076061
PubMed ID
18673303 View in PubMed
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Aerobic training involving a minor muscle mass shows greater efficiency than training involving a major muscle mass in chronic heart failure patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49956
Source
J Card Fail. 1999 Dec;5(4):300-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
R. Tyni-Lenné
A. Gordon
M. Jensen-Urstad
K. Dencker
E. Jansson
C. Sylvén
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska Institute and Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Card Fail. 1999 Dec;5(4):300-7
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biopsy, Needle
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Test - methods
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Heart Failure, Congestive - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - pathology - physiopathology
Physical Endurance
Quality of Life
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Beneficial training outcomes have been reported in sedentary patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) after exercise training. However, data on training effects in previously trained patients, as well as comparisons of different exercise modes, are lacking. The aim of this study is to compare exercise training on a cycle ergometer (major muscle mass) and aerobic knee-extensor training (minor muscle mass) in previously trained patients with CHF. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twenty-four men and women (age, 63 +/- 10 years [mean +/- SD]) with stable, moderate CHF (left ventricular ejection fraction, 30% +/- 11%) who had completed their first exercise training period more than 1 year ago were allocated to either the exercise or control group. After stratification for sex, age, ejection fraction, and cardiac output response, the training group was further randomized to either cycle ergometer or knee-extensor training for 8 weeks. The control and training patients did not differ at baseline, and the measured variables did not change in the control group during the 8 weeks. Citrate synthase activity in skeletal muscle increased after cycle training (23%; P
PubMed ID
10634671 View in PubMed
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Aetiology and risk factors of musculoskeletal disorders in physically active conscripts: a follow-up study in the Finnish Defence Forces.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142413
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2010;11:146
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Henri Taanila
Jaana Suni
Harri Pihlajamäki
Ville M Mattila
Olli Ohrankämmen
Petteri Vuorinen
Jari Parkkari
Author Affiliation
Tampere Research Centre of Sports Medicine, the UKK Institute, PO Box 30, 33501 Tampere, Finland. henri.taanila@uta.fi
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2010;11:146
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Therapy - methods
Exercise Tolerance - physiology
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Young Adult
Abstract
Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are the main reason for morbidity during military training. MSDs commonly result in functional impairment leading to premature discharge from military service and disabilities requiring long-term rehabilitation. The purpose of the study was to examine associations between various risk factors and MSDs with special attention to the physical fitness of the conscripts.
Two successive cohorts of 18 to 28-year-old male conscripts (N = 944, median age 19) were followed for six months. MSDs, including overuse and acute injuries, treated at the garrison clinic were identified and analysed. Associations between MSDs and risk factors were examined by multivariate Cox's proportional hazard models.
During the six-month follow-up of two successive cohorts there were 1629 MSDs and 2879 health clinic visits due to MSDs in 944 persons. The event-based incidence rate for MSD was 10.5 (95% confidence interval (CI): 10.0-11.1) per 1000 person-days. Most MSDs were in the lower extremities (65%) followed by the back (18%). The strongest baseline factors associated with MSDs were poor result in the combined outcome of a 12-minute running test and back lift test (hazard ratio (HR) 2.9; 95% CI: 1.9-4.6), high waist circumference (HR 1.7; 95% CI: 1.3-2.2), high body mass index (HR 1.8; 95% CI: 1.3-2.4), poor result in a 12-minute running test (HR 1.6; 95% CI: 1.2-2.2), earlier musculoskeletal symptoms (HR 1.7; 95% CI: 1.3-2.1) and poor school success (educational level and grades combined; HR 2.0; 95% CI: 1.3-3.0). In addition, risk factors of long-term MSDs (>or=10 service days lost due to one or several MSDs) were analysed: poor result in a 12-minute running test, earlier musculoskeletal symptoms, high waist circumference, high body mass index, not belonging to a sports club and poor result in the combined outcome of the 12-minute running test and standing long jump test were strongly associated with long-term MSDs.
The majority of the observed risk factors are modifiable and favourable for future interventions. An appropriate intervention based on the present study would improve both aerobic and muscular fitness prior to conscript training. Attention to appropriate waist circumference and body mass index would strengthen the intervention. Effective results from well-planned randomised controlled studies are needed before initiating large-scale prevention programmes in a military environment.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20602765 View in PubMed
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Alberta Diabetes and Physical Activity Trial (ADAPT): a randomized theory-based efficacy trial for adults with type 2 diabetes--rationale, design, recruitment, evaluation, and dissemination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146122
Source
Trials. 2010;11:4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Ronald C Plotnikoff
Kerry S Courneya
Ronald J Sigal
Jeffrey A Johnson
Nicholas Birkett
David Lau
Kim Raine
Steven T Johnson
Nandini Karunamuni
Author Affiliation
School of Education, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW Australia. ron.plotnikoff@newcastle.edu.au
Source
Trials. 2010;11:4
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy - instrumentation
Alberta
Behavior Therapy
Biological Markers - blood
Counseling
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - psychology - therapy
Exercise Therapy - methods
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Pamphlets
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Selection
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Design
Telephone
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The primary aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of three physical activity (PA) behavioural intervention strategies in a sample of adults with type 2 diabetes.
Participants (N = 287) were randomly assigned to one of three groups consisting of the following intervention strategies: (1) standard printed PA educational materials provided by the Canadian Diabetes Association [i.e., Group 1/control group)]; (2) standard printed PA educational materials as in Group 1, pedometers, a log book and printed PA information matched to individuals' PA stage of readiness provided every 3 months (i.e., Group 2); and (3) PA telephone counseling protocol matched to PA stage of readiness and tailored to personal characteristics, in addition to the materials provided in Groups 1 and 2 (i.e., Group 3). PA behaviour measured by the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire and related social-cognitive measures were assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 18-months (i.e., 6-month follow-up). Clinical (biomarkers) and health-related quality of life assessments were conducted at baseline, 12-months, and 18-months. Linear Mixed Model (LMM) analyses will be used to examine time-dependent changes from baseline across study time points for Groups 2 and 3 relative to Group 1.
ADAPT will determine whether tailored but low-cost interventions can lead to sustainable increases in PA behaviours. The results may have implications for practitioners in designing and implementing theory-based physical activity promotion programs for this population.
ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00221234.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20067626 View in PubMed
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The Alberta Diabetes and Physical Activity Trial (ADAPT): a randomized trial evaluating theory-based interventions to increase physical activity in adults with type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121291
Source
Ann Behav Med. 2013 Feb;45(1):45-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
R C Plotnikoff
N. Karunamuni
K S Courneya
R J Sigal
J A Johnson
S T Johnson
Author Affiliation
Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia. ron.plotnikoff@newcastle.edu.au
Source
Ann Behav Med. 2013 Feb;45(1):45-56
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Alberta
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - therapy
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
Physical activity (PA) is associated with reduced morbidity and mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); however, most T2DM adults are insufficiently active.
To explore the effectiveness of two innovative/theoretically based behavioral-change strategies to increase PA and reduce hemoglobin A1c (A1c) in T2DM adults.
Participants (n = 287) were randomly assigned to a control group or an intervention group (i.e., print-based materials/pedometer group or print-based materials/pedometer plus telephone-counseling group). Changes in PA and A1c and other clinical measures were examined by Linear Mixed Model analyses over 18 months, along with moderating effects for gender and age.
PA and A1c levels did not significantly change in intervention groups. Step counts significantly increased in the print-based materials and pedometer plus telephone counseling group, for women.
No significant effects were found for PA or A1c levels for T2DM adults. The multi-component strategy including telephone counseling may have potential for women. The trial was registered on ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00221234.
PubMed ID
22922954 View in PubMed
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