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A 2 year multidomain intervention of diet, exercise, cognitive training, and vascular risk monitoring versus control to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people (FINGER): a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264224
Source
Lancet. 2015 Jun 6;385(9984):2255-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-6-2015
Author
Tiia Ngandu
Jenni Lehtisalo
Alina Solomon
Esko Levälahti
Satu Ahtiluoto
Riitta Antikainen
Lars Bäckman
Tuomo Hänninen
Antti Jula
Tiina Laatikainen
Jaana Lindström
Francesca Mangialasche
Teemu Paajanen
Satu Pajala
Markku Peltonen
Rainer Rauramaa
Anna Stigsdotter-Neely
Timo Strandberg
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Hilkka Soininen
Miia Kivipelto
Source
Lancet. 2015 Jun 6;385(9984):2255-63
Date
Jun-6-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Double-Blind Method
Exercise
Exercise Therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Risk assessment
Vascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Modifiable vascular and lifestyle-related risk factors have been associated with dementia risk in observational studies. In the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER), a proof-of-concept randomised controlled trial, we aimed to assess a multidomain approach to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people from the general population.
In a double-blind randomised controlled trial we enrolled individuals aged 60-77 years recruited from previous national surveys. Inclusion criteria were CAIDE (Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia) Dementia Risk Score of at least 6 points and cognition at mean level or slightly lower than expected for age. We randomly assigned participants in a 1:1 ratio to a 2 year multidomain intervention (diet, exercise, cognitive training, vascular risk monitoring), or a control group (general health advice). Computer-generated allocation was done in blocks of four (two individuals randomly allocated to each group) at each site. Group allocation was not actively disclosed to participants and outcome assessors were masked to group allocation. The primary outcome was change in cognition as measured through comprehensive neuropsychological test battery (NTB) Z score. Analysis was by modified intention to treat (all participants with at least one post-baseline observation). This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01041989.
Between Sept 7, 2009, and Nov 24, 2011, we screened 2654 individuals and randomly assigned 1260 to the intervention group (n=631) or control group (n=629). 591 (94%) participants in the intervention group and 599 (95%) in the control group had at least one post-baseline assessment and were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis. Estimated mean change in NTB total Z score at 2 years was 0·20 (SE 0·02, SD 0·51) in the intervention group and 0·16 (0·01, 0·51) in the control group. Between-group difference in the change of NTB total score per year was 0·022 (95% CI 0·002-0·042, p=0·030). 153 (12%) individuals dropped out overall. Adverse events occurred in 46 (7%) participants in the intervention group compared with six (1%) participants in the control group; the most common adverse event was musculoskeletal pain (32 [5%] individuals for intervention vs no individuals for control).
Findings from this large, long-term, randomised controlled trial suggest that a multidomain intervention could improve or maintain cognitive functioning in at-risk elderly people from the general population.
Academy of Finland, La Carita Foundation, Alzheimer Association, Alzheimer's Research and Prevention Foundation, Juho Vainio Foundation, Novo Nordisk Foundation, Finnish Social Insurance Institution, Ministry of Education and Culture, Salama bint Hamdan Al Nahyan Foundation, Axa Research Fund, EVO funding for University Hospitals of Kuopio, Oulu, and Turku and for Seinäjoki Central Hospital and Oulu City Hospital, Swedish Research Council, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, and af Jochnick Foundation.
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Neurol. 2015 May;11(5):24825799934
PubMed ID
25771249 View in PubMed
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A 10-week strength training program: effect on the motor performance of an unimpaired upper extremity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50029
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1998 Aug;79(8):925-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
K J Kauranen
P T Siira
H V Vanharanta
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Oulu University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1998 Aug;79(8):925-30
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arm - physiology
Electromyography
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Motor Skills - physiology
Movement - physiology
Weight Lifting
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Muscle strength training is one of the most common therapy methods in physical therapy programs, and the usual goal of this treatment is to improve muscle strength. Little attention has been paid, however, to the effects of strength training on the other components of motor performance. This study examined the effects of a 10-week strength training program on the motor performance of the hand, including reaction time, speed of movement, tapping speed, and coordination in normal healthy volunteers. DESIGN: Before-after trial. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: Sixteen healthy women volunteers aged 25 to 45 years participated. INTERVENTION: Subjects accomplished a 10-week muscle strength training program of the upper extremities. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Reaction time, speed of movement, tapping speed, and coordination were measured three times on consecutive days, and muscle strength and electromyographic values of the right upper extremity were recorded once before the training period. After the training period, the same measurements were made as before the training. RESULTS: The 10-week strength training decreased choice reaction time by 6% (p
PubMed ID
9710164 View in PubMed
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A 24-week dietary and physical activity lifestyle intervention reduces hepatic insulin resistance in the obese with chronic hepatitis C.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117638
Source
Liver Int. 2013 Mar;33(3):410-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Venessa Pattullo
Andres Duarte-Rojo
Wael Soliman
Florencia Vargas-Vorackova
Sanjeev Sockalingam
Ivan G Fantus
Johane Allard
Jenny Heathcote
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Liver Int. 2013 Mar;33(3):410-9
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Basal Metabolism
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Hepatitis C, Chronic - complications - pathology
Humans
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Obesity - complications - diet therapy - therapy
Ontario
Prospective Studies
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Obesity- and virus-mediated insulin resistance (IR) are associated with adverse hepatic and metabolic outcomes in chronic hepatitis C (CHC). This study evaluates the tolerability and effects of a dietary and physical activity (PA) intervention in obese patients with insulin-resistant CHC.
Obese patients (body mass index, BMI =30 kg/m(2) ) with CHC were recruited prospectively. Non-diabetic patients with IR (homeostasis model assessment of IR, HOMA-IR >2.0) proceeded to a 24-week lifestyle intervention comprising pedometer monitored increase in PA (=10 000 steps/day) and an individualised dietary plan.
Ten non-cirrhotic and six cirrhotic patients [age 52 ± 8.5 years, BMI 35.9 (31.46-38.21)kg/m(2) ] were recruited, of whom all 16 (100%) completed the 24-week protocol. Increase in PA from 6853 (2440-9533) to 10 697 (7959-13566) steps/day (P = 0.001) and reduction in caloric intake from 2263 (1805.4-2697.0) to 1281 (1099.5-1856.3) kcal/day (equivalent to reduction of median 33% (25.3-49.8%), P
PubMed ID
23278982 View in PubMed
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2010 clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in Canada: summary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140116
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Nov 23;182(17):1864-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-23-2010
Author
Alexandra Papaioannou
Suzanne Morin
Angela M Cheung
Stephanie Atkinson
Jacques P Brown
Sidney Feldman
David A Hanley
Anthony Hodsman
Sophie A Jamal
Stephanie M Kaiser
Brent Kvern
Kerry Siminoski
William D Leslie
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. papaioannou@hhsc.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Nov 23;182(17):1864-73
Date
Nov-23-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Age Factors
Bone Density
Bone Density Conservation Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Calcium - therapeutic use
Canada
Dietary Supplements
Exercise Therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - diagnosis - therapy
Osteoporotic Fractures - prevention & control
Risk factors
Vitamin D - therapeutic use
Notes
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PubMed ID
20940232 View in PubMed
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The acceptability of physical activity programming within a smoking cessation service for individuals with severe mental illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165975
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Apr;66(1):123-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Guy Faulkner
Adrian Taylor
Shelly Munro
Peter Selby
Chris Gee
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Physical Education and Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. guy.faulkner@utoronto.ca
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Apr;66(1):123-6
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Exercise Therapy
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk Reduction Behavior
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Schizophrenic Psychology
Self Concept
Severity of Illness Index
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Smoking Cessation - psychology
Social Support
Abstract
There is a high prevalence of smoking and physical inactivity among individuals with severe mental illness (SMI). The current study assessed the acceptability of introducing physical activity, including perceived advantages and disadvantages, as an adjunct to a smoking cessation service within this population.
109 participants with SMI who were receiving smoking cessation treatment completed a survey assessing perceived interest in physical activity and a 24-item decisional balance questionnaire reflecting potential advantages and disadvantages of becoming more physically active.
The majority of the participants reported being interested in assistance in becoming more active [63% (69/109)]. The highest rated advantages reported were 'It would improve my health or reduce my risk of disease' and 'It would improve how I feel about myself'. Cost, and being active by oneself were the most frequently reported barriers.
This study suggests that many individuals with SMI seeking treatment for smoking cessation may also be receptive to assistance in becoming more physically active. Such individuals endorse both advantages and disadvantages more frequently than those not interested.
This study provides preliminary support for the acceptability of adding physical activity as a smoking cessation strategy with SMI individuals. Addressing salient barriers will be critical to integrating physical activity within this smoking cessation service.
PubMed ID
17184957 View in PubMed
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ACL injury incidence in female handball 10 years after the Norwegian ACL prevention study: important lessons learned.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116381
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2013 May;47(8):476-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Grethe Myklebust
Arnhild Skjølberg
Roald Bahr
Author Affiliation
Oslo Sport Trauma Research Center, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Department of Sports Medicine, Oslo, Norway. grethe.myklebust@nih.no
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2013 May;47(8):476-9
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anterior Cruciate Ligament - injuries
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Norway
Track and Field - injuries
PubMed ID
23403528 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Active regimen in the management of the postpartum period]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50469
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1974 Nov-dec;(6):46-9
Publication Type
Article

Acute hamstring injuries in Swedish elite sprinters and jumpers: a prospective randomised controlled clinical trial comparing two rehabilitation protocols.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258296
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2014 Apr;48(7):532-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Carl M Askling
Magnus Tengvar
Olga Tarassova
Alf Thorstensson
Author Affiliation
The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, , Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2014 Apr;48(7):532-9
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Athletic Injuries - rehabilitation
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Muscle, Skeletal - injuries
Prospective Studies
Recovery of Function - physiology
Running - injuries
Sprains and Strains - rehabilitation
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Hamstring strain is a common injury in sprinters and jumpers, and therefore time to return to sport and secondary prevention become of particular concern.
To compare the effectiveness of two rehabilitation protocols after acute hamstring injury in Swedish elite sprinters and jumpers by evaluating time needed to return to full participation in the training process.
Prospective randomised comparison of two rehabilitation protocols.
Fifty-six Swedish elite sprinters and jumpers with acute hamstring injury, verified by MRI, were randomly assigned to one of two rehabilitation protocols. Twenty-eight athletes were assigned to a protocol emphasising lengthening exercises, L-protocol, and 28 athletes to a protocol consisting of conventional exercises, C-protocol. The outcome measure was the number of days to return to full training. Re-injuries were registered during a period of 12 months after return.
Time to return was significantly shorter for the athletes in the L-protocol, mean 49 days (1SD±26, range 18-107 days), compared with the C-protocol, mean 86 days (1SD±34, range 26-140 days). Irrespective of protocol, hamstring injuries where the proximal free tendon was involved took a significantly longer time to return than injuries that did not involve the free tendon, L-protocol: mean 73 vs 31 days and C-protocol: mean 116 vs 63 days, respectively. Two reinjuries were registered, both in the C-protocol.
A rehabilitation protocol emphasising lengthening type of exercises is more effective than a protocol containing conventional exercises in promoting time to return in Swedish elite sprinters and jumpers.
PubMed ID
24620041 View in PubMed
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Acute whiplash-associated disorders (WAD): the effects of early mobilization and prognostic factors in long-term symptomatology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49911
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2000 Oct;14(5):457-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
A. Söderlund
C. Olerud
P. Lindberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2000 Oct;14(5):457-67
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Early Ambulation
Exercise Therapy
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Immobilization
Male
Neck - physiopathology
Pain - etiology - rehabilitation
Pain Measurement
Prognosis
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Efficacy
Shoulder - physiopathology
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Whiplash Injuries - complications - rehabilitation
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare two different home exercise programmes for patients with acute whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). A further aim was to describe the initial prognostic variables related to self-reported pain at six months follow-up. DESIGN: A randomized treatment study with a follow-up period of six months. SETTINGS: The study was undertaken in an orthopaedic clinic at a university hospital. SUBJECTS: A total of 59 symptomatic (neck pain, stiffness, etc.) patients with acute whiplash injury. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were randomized to a regular treatment group (RT group) and an additional-exercise treatment group (AT group). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pain Disability Index (PDI), Self-Efficacy Scale (SES), Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ), neck range of motion (ROM), head posture, kinaesthetic sensibility, visual analogue scale (VAS). RESULTS: Patients given an additional exercise did not improve more than patients with regular treatment. Only one CSQ item, 'Ability to decrease pain', showed a significant difference between the groups in its pattern of change over time: the AT group had a significant increase between three and six months whilst values in the RT group decreased. Nonsymptomatic patients at six months follow-up were characterized by initially better self-efficacy, lower disability and significantly different patterns in the use of 'behavioural coping strategies' when compared with symptomatic patients. The nonsymptomatic patients also reported more frequent training than symptomatic patients, i.e. they complied better with the treatment regime. CONCLUSION: This home exercise programme, including training of neck and shoulder ROM, relaxation and general advice seems to be sufficient treatment for acute WAD patients when used on a daily basis. Additionally, patients reporting low self-efficacy and high disability levels may profit from more attention initially, as these psychological factors are significant predictors of pain at long-term follow-up.
PubMed ID
11043871 View in PubMed
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Aerobic exercise intensity assessment and prescription in cardiac rehabilitation: a joint position statement of the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation and the Canadian Association of Cardiac Rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119409
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2013 Jun;20(3):442-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Alessandro Mezzani
Larry F Hamm
Andrew M Jones
Patrick E McBride
Trine Moholdt
James A Stone
Axel Urhausen
Mark A Williams
Author Affiliation
Salvatore Maugeri Foundation IRCCS, Scientific Institute of Veruno, Exercise Pathophysiology Laboratory, Cardiac Rehabilitation Division, Italy. alessandro.mezzani@fsm.it
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2013 Jun;20(3):442-67
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Europe
Exercise Test - standards
Exercise Therapy - standards
Exercise Tolerance
Heart Diseases - diagnosis - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Humans
Predictive value of tests
Recovery of Function
Societies, Medical - standards
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
Aerobic exercise intensity prescription is a key issue in cardiac rehabilitation, being directly linked to both the amount of improvement in exercise capacity and the risk of adverse events during exercise. This joint position statement aims to provide professionals with up-to-date information regarding the identification of different exercise intensity domains, the methods of direct and indirect determination of exercise intensity for both continuous and interval aerobic training, the effects of the use of different exercise protocols on exercise intensity prescription and the indications for recommended exercise training prescription in specific cardiac patients' groups. The importance of functional evaluation through exercise testing prior to starting an aerobic training program is strongly emphasized, and ramp incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test, when available, is proposed as the gold standard for a physiologically comprehensive exercise intensity assessment and prescription. This may allow a shift from a 'range-based' to a 'threshold-based' aerobic exercise intensity prescription, which, combined with thorough clinical evaluation and exercise-related risk assessment, could maximize the benefits obtainable by the use of aerobic exercise training in cardiac rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
23104970 View in PubMed
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592 records – page 1 of 60.