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The 6-min walk test: responses in healthy Canadians aged 45 to 85 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130789
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2011 Oct;36(5):643-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Kylie Hill
Lisa M Wickerson
Lynda J Woon
Afshin Heidar Abady
Tom J Overend
Roger S Goldstein
Dina Brooks
Author Affiliation
Department of Respirology, West Park Healthcare Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2011 Oct;36(5):643-9
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Algorithms
Exercise Test
Female
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Oxygen consumption
Physical Fitness
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Respiration
Respiratory Rate
Sex Characteristics
Tidal Volume
Time Factors
Walking
Abstract
We sought to describe responses to the 6-min walk test (6MWT) in healthy Canadian adults in order to facilitate interpretation of its results in patient populations. Seventy-seven healthy Canadians aged 45 to 85 years (65 ± 11 years, 40 females) completed this study. During a single visit, three 6MWTs were undertaken. The main outcome measure was 6-min walk distance (6MWD). Age, gender, height, and weight were recorded. In 61 (79%) participants, cardiorespiratory variables were collected during the third 6MWT using a calibrated portable gas analysis system. The 6MWD increased between the first and second test (615 ± 96 to 639 ± 98 m; p
PubMed ID
21967531 View in PubMed
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Absence of effect on exercise capacity of 12-weeks treatment with ramipril in patients with moderate congestive heart failure. Ramipril Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50173
Source
Eur Heart J. 1994 Dec;15(12):1659-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
T. Gundersen
K. Swedberg
O. Amtorp
J. Remes
B. Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Medical Department, Aust-Agder Central Hospital, Arendal, Norway.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1994 Dec;15(12):1659-65
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiac Output, Low - drug therapy
Double-Blind Method
Exercise Test
Heart Failure, Congestive - drug therapy
Humans
Ramipril - therapeutic use
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Pharmacological therapy in cases of chronic congestive heart failure (CHF) is usually evaluated by maximal exercise time. To assess the effect of an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, ramipril, 223 patients with moderate CHF were studied in 24 centres in four Nordic countries in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group design. The study drug was titrated from 1.25 mg to a maximum of 10 mg once daily (o.d) over a period of 4 weeks (mean dose 8 mg). A symptom-limited bicycle exercise test, starting at 30 watts and increasing by 10 watts.min-1, was used to evaluate exercise capacity. Reproducible tests were required at baseline, and the test was repeated after 4, 8 and 12 weeks of treatment. Seven deaths were recorded in the placebo group and one death in the ramipril group. A total of 195 patients completed 12 weeks of treatment (placebo group n = 91, ramipril group n = 104). The groups had similar baseline characteristics. Maximal exercise time was increased by mean (SD) 35 s (9) and 41 s (8) in the placebo and ramipril groups, respectively. The adjusted difference between the groups at 12 weeks was 9 s (12) (ns). A significant decrease in blood pressure and rate-pressure product at rest and at end of exercise was obtained by ramipril as compared with placebo. Significantly fewer patients deteriorated in NYHA class from baseline to 12 weeks of ramipril treatment compared to placebo (P = 0.012). Concomitant medication for CHF increased significantly in the placebo group as compared with ramipril-treated patients (P = 0.003).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
7698136 View in PubMed
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Absence of pre-dose rebound phenomena with once daily 5-ISMN in a controlled-release formulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11864
Source
Eur Heart J. 1992 Jun;13(6):814-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
G. Olsson
J. Allgén
O. Amtorp
G. Nyberg
J O Parker
Author Affiliation
Cardiovascular Medicine, Astra Hässle AB, Mölndal, Sweden.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1992 Jun;13(6):814-7
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angina Pectoris - blood - drug therapy - prevention & control
Delayed-Action Preparations
Double-Blind Method
Drug Tolerance
Exercise Test
Humans
Isosorbide Dinitrate - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Middle Aged
Sweden
Time Factors
Vasodilator Agents - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
To avoid the development of nitrate tolerance secondary to relatively constant elevated plasma nitrate concentrations, intermittent nitrate dosing has been advocated. However, a nitrate-free interval may induce a rebound increase in myocardial ischaemia, and thus increase anginal symptoms during the latter portion of the dosing interval. This was suggested by the results of recent studies in which nitroglycerin patches were administered intermittently with a 12 h nitrate-free interval. The present investigation was carried out to determine whether a controlled-release formulation of 60 mg isosorbide-5-mononitrate (5-ISMN) would produce such a rebound phenomenon. Seventy-nine patients, who had participated in four crossover, placebo-controlled studies in which the treatment arms lasted for between 1 and 2 weeks, were reviewed. These studies had assessed the efficacy of this nitrate preparation by exercise testing and each had included exercise testing at the end of each treatment phase, 24 h after the last medication had been administered. There were no differences noted in the time to onset of angina, the time to onset of 1 mm ST segment depression or the total exercise duration between the two treatment phases, indicating an absence of rebound phenomena at the end of the dosing interval. The reason for the absence of a detectable pre-dose rebound is unclear, but the plasma concentration profile of 5-ISMN produced by the presently used preparation, resulting in a nitrate-low instead of nitrate-free interval, may have contributed.
PubMed ID
1623873 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of noninvasive stress myocardial imaging for detecting coronary artery disease in clinical practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143550
Source
Hosp Pract (1995). 2010 Apr;38(2):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Leonard Schwartz
Christopher B Overgaard
Author Affiliation
Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. Dr.Leonard.Schwartz@uhn.on.ca
Source
Hosp Pract (1995). 2010 Apr;38(2):14-8
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Coronary Angiography - standards
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology
Echocardiography - standards
Exercise Test - standards
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods - standards
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Selection
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Distribution
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon - standards
Abstract
There is a wide variation in reported accuracy ofnoninvasive stress myocardial imaging as a screening tool for coronary artery disease (CAD). This study was undertaken to determine its current accuracy in a wide spectrum of patients with chest pain syndromes using invasive coronary angiography as the gold standard.
The patient population consisted of consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography in whom noninvasive stress imaging, either nuclear or echocardiographic, was performed within 6 months prior to the angiogram. The specificity, sensitivity, positive and negative predictive values, and diagnostic accuracy for detecting > or =1 lesions with > or =50% diameter coronary stenosis were determined for each modality.
Of the 227 eligible patients, 141 were men and 86 were women; 70% had significant CAD. The diagnostic accuracy overall was 71% and was no different for nuclear or echocardiographic testing. The positive predictive value (86% vs. 52%; P = 0.002) and diagnostic accuracy (83% vs. 51%; P = 0.002) were better in men than in women.
In this study, noninvasive stress imaging lacked the accuracy of a good screening test for significant CAD. This finding was particularly true for women, for whom it was not much better than a coin toss.
PubMed ID
20469609 View in PubMed
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ACE genotype and physical training effects: a randomized study among elderly Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49706
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2003 Aug;15(4):284-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Henrik Frederiksen
Lise Bathum
Charlotte Worm
Kaare Christensen
Lis Puggaard
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, Epidemiology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. hfrederiksen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2003 Aug;15(4):284-91
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biomechanics
Body Composition
Denmark
Exercise
Exercise Test
Frail Elderly
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Humans
Oxygen consumption
Patient Selection
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A - genetics
Walking - physiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The level of physical functioning (PF) late in life has, in recent years, been shown to be influenced by genetic factors. One of the most extensively studied genetic variants associated with PF and trainability is insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in the gene encoding Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE). However, ACE studies have mainly been conducted among younger persons in excellent physical shape. In this study, we examine whether the level of PF, trainability, or rate-of-change are associated with the ACE genotype among the elderly. METHODS: We used data from 4 randomized training studies of elderly Danes (N = 203). The measures of PF were self-report, maximal oxygen uptake, muscle strength, walking speed, and body composition. RESULTS: Overall, a favorable change in the measures of PF was observed in training groups compared with control groups. However, within groups, neither pre- or post-training/control period levels of PF nor differences in pre- and post-levels were associated with the ACE genotype. CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of our randomized studies, we could not detect any association between the ACE genotype and the level of PF or change, regardless of whether response to physical training or spontaneous changes was studied.
PubMed ID
14661817 View in PubMed
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Acetylcholine receptor M2 gene variants, heart rate recovery, and risk of cardiac death after an acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91406
Source
Ann Med. 2009;41(3):197-207
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Hautala Arto J
Tulppo Mikko P
Kiviniemi Antti M
Rankinen Tuomo
Bouchard Claude
Mäkikallio Timo H
Huikuri Heikki V
Author Affiliation
Department of Exercise and Medical Physiology, Verve Research, Kasarmintie 13, Oulu, Finland. arto.hautala@verve.fi
Source
Ann Med. 2009;41(3):197-207
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Exercise Test
Female
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - mortality - physiopathology
Polymorphism, Genetic
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Receptor, Muscarinic M2 - genetics
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: We aimed to replicate the previously observed association between acetylcholine receptor subtype M2 (CHRM2) gene polymorphisms and heart rate recovery (HRR) after exercise in patients with a recent acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and assess the prognostic significance of CHRM2 gene variants after AMI. METHODS: HRR was determined as the difference between maximal heart rate and heart rate at 1 minute after the symptom-limited bicycle exercise test in 192 post-AMI patients. Genetic variants at the CHRM2 locus in intron 5 (rs324640) and the 3'-UTR of exon 6 (rs8191992) were assessed. RESULTS: The rs324640 C/C and rs8191992 A/A homozygotes had more than a 3-fold risk of being in the lowest HRR quartile (
PubMed ID
18979273 View in PubMed
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[A comparative analysis of different approaches to identifying cardiovascular diseases in coal miners during medical selection]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49975
Source
Lik Sprava. 1999 Mar;(2):130-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
L N Sizonenko
V V Cherkesov
Source
Lik Sprava. 1999 Mar;(2):130-5
Date
Mar-1999
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis
Coal Mining
Comparative Study
Echocardiography
Electrocardiography
English Abstract
Exercise Test
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis
Personnel Selection - methods
Risk factors
Ukraine
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
An expert evaluation of identifiability of cardiovascular diseases was carried out together with a clinical and functional examination of certain groups of miners of basic underground occupations at different ages and lengths of service, that showed a high incidence of cardiovascular diseases along with a low informative value of methodical approaches, indices and criteria used for their diagnosis in conducting preliminary and periodic health check-ups. To improve the quality of diagnosis of diseases of the circulatory system it is necessary that standardized methods of investigation should be employed together with consistent indices of high informative value as well as a purposive training of physicians.
PubMed ID
10424067 View in PubMed
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The Actiheart in adolescents: a doubly labelled water validation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118532
Source
Pediatr Exerc Sci. 2012 Nov;24(4):589-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Nerissa Campbell
Harry Prapavessis
Casey Gray
Erin McGowan
Elaine Rush
Ralph Maddison
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Exerc Sci. 2012 Nov;24(4):589-602
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Body mass index
Child
Cohort Studies
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Exercise Test - instrumentation - methods
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Monitoring, Physiologic - instrumentation
Motor Activity - physiology
Ontario
Water - diagnostic use
Abstract
This study investigated the validity of the Actiheart device for estimating free-living physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) in adolescents.
Total energy expenditure (TEE) was measured in eighteen Canadian adolescents, aged 15-18 years, by DLW. Physical activity energy expenditure was calculated as 0.9 X TEE minus resting energy expenditure, assuming 10% for the thermic effect of feeding. Participants wore the chest mounted Actiheart device which records simultaneously minute-by-minute acceleration (ACC) and heart rate (HR). Using both children and adult branched equation modeling, derived from laboratory-based activity, PAEE was estimated from the ACC and HR data. Linear regression analyses examined the association between PAEE derived from the Actiheart and DLW method where DLW PAEE served as the dependent variable. Measurement of agreement between the two methods was analyzed using the Bland-Altman procedure.
A nonsignificant association was found between the children derived Actiheart and DLW PAEE values (R = .23, R(2) = .05, p = .36); whereas a significant association was found between the adult derived Actiheart and DLW PAEE values (R = .53, R(2) = .29, p
PubMed ID
23196766 View in PubMed
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Active commuting to school in children and adolescents: an opportunity to increase physical activity and fitness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140649
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Dec;38(8):873-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Palma Chillón
Francisco B Ortega
Jonatan R Ruiz
Toomas Veidebaum
Leila Oja
Jarek Mäestu
Michael Sjöström
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Education and Sport, School of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain. pchillon@ugr.es
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Dec;38(8):873-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bicycling - physiology
Child
Estonia
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Test
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Questionnaires
Schools
Sweden
Transportation
Walking - physiology
Abstract
The purpose was to describe the patterns of commuting to school in young people and to examine its associations with physical activity (PA) and cardiorespiratory fitness.
The sample comprised 2271 Estonian and Swedish children and adolescents (1218 females) aged 9-10 years and 15-16 years. Data were collected in 1998/99. Mode of commuting to and from school was assessed by questionnaire. Time spent (min/day) in PA and average PA (counts/min) was measured by accelerometry. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed by means of a maximal cycle ergometer test.
Sixty-one percent of the participants reported active commuting to school (ACS). Estonian youth showed lower levels of ACS than Swedish (odds ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.53-0.76) and girls reported lower levels than boys (0.74; 0.62-0.88). ACS boys showed higher PA levels than non-ACS boys for moderate, vigorous, MVPA, and average PA levels (all p = 0.01). Participants who cycled to school had higher cardiorespiratory fitness than walkers or passive travellers (p
PubMed ID
20855356 View in PubMed
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Activity patterns of the Canadian Eskimo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature946
Source
Pages 193-215 in O.G. Edholm and E.K.E. Gunderson, eds. Polar human biology. Proceedings of the SCAR/IUPS/IUBS Symposium on Human Biology and Medicine in the Antarctic. William Heinemann Medical Books Publication, Chicago, IL.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1974
Author
Godin, G.
Shephard, R.J.
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto
Source
Pages 193-215 in O.G. Edholm and E.K.E. Gunderson, eds. Polar human biology. Proceedings of the SCAR/IUPS/IUBS Symposium on Human Biology and Medicine in the Antarctic. William Heinemann Medical Books Publication, Chicago, IL.
Date
1974
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Igloolik
Exercise testing
Energy cost
Oxygen consumption
Methodology
Fitness
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1065.
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837 records – page 1 of 84.