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Acoustic-reflex responses in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48476
Source
Am J Otolaryngol. 1994 Mar-Apr;15(2):109-13
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Virtaniemi
M. Laakso
J. Nuutinen
S. Karjalainen
E. Vartiainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Am J Otolaryngol. 1994 Mar-Apr;15(2):109-13
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Impedance Tests
Adult
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Autonomic Nervous System - physiology
Autonomic Nervous System Diseases - physiopathology
Blood Glucose - analysis
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - drug therapy - metabolism - physiopathology
Diabetic Angiopathies - physiopathology
Diabetic Neuropathies - physiopathology
Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem - physiology
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Male
Reaction Time - physiology
Reflex, Acoustic - physiology
Reflex, Stretch - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: Patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) are especially susceptible to microangiopathic complications such as nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Microangiopathic changes are also the most important findings in histopathologic studies of the inner ear and central nervous systems in diabetic subjects. No previous studies have measured acoustic-reflex latencies (ARL) or amplitudes (ARA) in patients with IDDM. ARL and ARA reflect the function of the acoustic-reflex arch. Furthermore, possible changes in the tympanic membrane, ossicular chain, and stapedius muscle may affect the shape of acoustic-reflex. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Acoustic-reflex thresholds, latencies, and amplitudes were studied in 53 patients with IDDM and 42 randomly selected nondiabetic control subjects, aged between 20 and 40 years, using the Madsen Model ZO 73 Impedance Bridge (Madsen Electronics, Copenhagen, Denmark). Subjects with an abnormal tympanic membrane, conductive hearing loss, and known cause for hearing impairment eg, noise damage, were excluded from the study. RESULTS: There were no differences between control and diabetic subjects in the contralateral acoustic-reflex thresholds. In contrast, patients with IDDM had longer ARLs and decreased ARAs compared with those of control subjects. ARA amplitude had linear correlation with the amplitude of tympanogram, whereas ARL had no linear correlation with auditory brainstem latencies in the same study subjects. Acoustic-reflex responses in insulin-dependent diabetic patients were not associated with the duration of diabetes, metabolic control, microangiopathy, or neuropathy. CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged ARLs and decreased ARAs in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes are probably caused more by the stiff middle ear system than disturbances in the brainstem.
PubMed ID
8179101 View in PubMed
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[Age- and sex-related differences in brainstem auditory evoked potentials in secondary school students living in Northern European Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146160
Source
Fiziol Cheloveka. 2009 Nov-Dec;35(6):56-67
Publication Type
Article

Analysis of measurements from the first Swedish universal neonatal hearing screening program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93945
Source
Int J Audiol. 2007 Nov;46(11):680-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Hergils Leif
Author Affiliation
Center for Medical Technology Assessment, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. leihe@inr.liu.se
Source
Int J Audiol. 2007 Nov;46(11):680-5
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain Stem - physiology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Databases as Topic
Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem - physiology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neonatal Screening - organization & administration
Otoacoustic Emissions, Spontaneous - physiology
Reference Values
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Software
Sweden
United States
Abstract
This study analyses results from the first Swedish UNHS program. It includes over 33 000 measurement files from 14 287 children at two maternity wards. The screening program uses a two-stage TEOAE test procedure. A database was created in MedLog after data transformation in Word and Excel. The coverage rate was 99.1%. Bilateral pass rate after retesting was 97.0%. A unilateral pass criterion would have resulted in 1268 fewer children (9.0% of target group) for retesting and 231 fewer children (1.6% of target group) for diagnostic evaluation. When the first test was performed on the day the child was born, the pass rate was 64.8%; the pass rate increased to 89.2% when testing> or =3 days after birth. High coverage rates and pass rates were found to be possible, independent of the number of children born at the maternity ward. Learning curves were observed in the program with improvements distributed over time. Test performance was clearly better when the children were tested day two after birth or later.
PubMed ID
17978950 View in PubMed
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[A new method for detecting congenital hearing disorders. Infants are screened by measuring otoacoustic emissions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33402
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Mar 10;96(10):1166-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-1999
Author
L. Hergils
Author Affiliation
ENT Dept, Universitetssjukhuset, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Mar 10;96(10):1166-8
Date
Mar-10-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Europe
Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem
Hearing Disorders - congenital - diagnosis - physiopathology
Hearing Tests - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Otoacoustic Emissions, Spontaneous
Sweden
United States
Abstract
Despite various infant screening programmes, congenital hearing deficit is normally detected too late. However, the measurement of otoacoustic emissions (OAE) has now proved to be an effective means of assessing neonatal hearing. The article consists in an outline of both international and Swedish experience of universal neonatal screening programmes using OAE testing. Since universal OAE screening was introduced at University Hospital, Linköping, in September 1995, some 6,000 infants have been tested. During the first two years 98.5 per cent of the children participated. Satisfactory bilateral OAE test results were obtained in 97.1 per cent of cases. Where further investigation was necessary, it took the form of auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing during natural rest, or full diagnostic ABR testing under general anaesthesia.
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 1999 Jun 9;96(23):2835-610405529
PubMed ID
10193119 View in PubMed
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Assessing auditory evoked potentials of wild harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294363
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 07; 140(1):442
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2016
Author
Andreas Ruser
Michael Dähne
Abbo van Neer
Klaus Lucke
Janne Sundermeyer
Ursula Siebert
Dorian S Houser
James J Finneran
Eligius Everaarts
Jolanda Meerbeek
Rune Dietz
Signe Sveegaard
Jonas Teilmann
Author Affiliation
Institute for Terrestrial and Aquatic Wildlife Research, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Büsum, SH, Germany.
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 07; 140(1):442
Date
07-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation
Animals
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Denmark
Evoked Potentials, Auditory - physiology
Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem - physiology
Noise - adverse effects
Phocoena - physiology
Abstract
Testing the hearing abilities of marine mammals under water is a challenging task. Sample sizes are usually low, thus limiting the ability to generalize findings of susceptibility towards noise influences. A method to measure harbor porpoise hearing thresholds in situ in outdoor conditions using auditory steady state responses of the brainstem was developed and tested. The method was used on 15 live-stranded animals from the North Sea during rehabilitation, shortly before release into the wild, and on 12 wild animals incidentally caught in pound nets in Denmark (inner Danish waters). Results indicated that although the variability between individuals is wide, the shape of the hearing curve is generally similar to previously published results from behavioral trials. Using 10-kHz frequency intervals between 10 and 160 kHz, best hearing was found between 120 and 130?kHz. Additional testing using one-third octave frequency intervals (from 16 to 160?kHz) allowed for a much faster hearing assessment, but eliminated the fine scale threshold characteristics. For further investigations, the method will be used to better understand the factors influencing sensitivity differences across individuals and to establish population-level parameters describing hearing abilities of harbor porpoises.
PubMed ID
27475168 View in PubMed
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Assessment of diagnostic approaches to idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss and their influence on treatment and outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149071
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2010 Mar;130(3):384-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Ramesh Nosrati-Zarenoe
Magnus Hansson
Elisabeth Hultcrantz
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Otorhinolaryngology, Linköping University, Linköping.
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2010 Mar;130(3):384-91
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Blood Chemical Analysis
Brain Stem Infarctions - diagnosis
Child
Databases, Factual
Diagnosis, Differential
Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem - physiology
Female
Hearing Loss, Sudden - classification - etiology - therapy
Hematoma, Subdural - diagnosis
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Neuroma, Acoustic - diagnosis
Pons - blood supply
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden
Tinnitus - etiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Vertigo - etiology
Vestibular Function Tests
Young Adult
Abstract
Results from a database for sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) demonstrate no correlation between laboratory findings, treatment, and outcome in 400 patients. The patients with pathological test results were not treated differently from those with normal test results. The value of laboratory findings and MRI might increase if the results are categorized to more specific diagnoses.
To investigate diagnostic test batteries for SSNHL and evaluate their value in the management of idiopathic SSNHL.
A total of 400 patients submitted to the Swedish national database for SSNHL were analyzed. Information was collected about the patient's past medical history, potential precipitating events, trauma, medical history, hearing loss, current disease, diagnostic protocol, and treatment, using questionnaires as well as two audiograms, one at the first ENT clinic visit and another 3 months later.
In all, 65% of these 400 patients underwent hematological tests and 40% had an MRI/CT scan. Twenty-two of 160 MRI investigated had pathological findings including 5 acoustic neuromas. Also, 300 of these 400 patients were evaluated as having idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL); 24% of them had one or more pathological test results. No significant correlation was found between either the MRI findings or the laboratory findings with regard to treatment or hearing recovery in patients with ISSNHL.
PubMed ID
19688620 View in PubMed
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Audiometric accuracy of the click ABR in infants at risk for hearing loss.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229392
Source
J Am Acad Audiol. 1990 Apr;1(2):59-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
M L Hyde
K. Riko
K. Malizia
Author Affiliation
Otologic Function Unit, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Am Acad Audiol. 1990 Apr;1(2):59-66
Date
Apr-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Audiometry, Evoked Response - methods - standards
Audiometry, Pure-Tone - methods - standards
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Child, Preschool
Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem - physiology
False Negative Reactions
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - diagnosis - physiopathology - prevention & control
Humans
Infant
Mass Screening - organization & administration
Ontario
Abstract
The auditory brainstem response (ABR) to clicks is widely used for early detection of hearing loss in the child at risk for hearing dysfunction, but there is a lack of direct, large-sample estimates of test accuracy. In this report, results and preliminary analyses are presented that relate click ABR thresholds obtained at 3 to 12 months corrected age to detailed follow-up behavioral puretone audiometry at 3 to 8 years of age, for 1,367 ears in 713 children at risk for hearing loss. The data are analyzed in terms of conventional 2 x 2 decision matrices and associated parameters, using dichotomous (binary) measures of hearing loss and ABR test outcome. The accuracy of the ABR appears to depend strongly on the precise criteria that are chosen to define both hearing loss and ABR outcome. ABR accuracy is excellent for detecting average sensorineural hearing loss at 2 and 4 kHz in excess of 30 dB, and the overall results for a wide range of hearing loss and ABR abnormality criteria can be conveniently summarized in terms of relative operating characteristics (ROCs).
PubMed ID
2132587 View in PubMed
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Benchmark dose calculations for methylmercury-associated delays on evoked potential latencies in two cohorts of children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31489
Source
Risk Anal. 2002 Jun;22(3):465-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Katsuyuki Murata
Esben Budtz-Jørgensen
Philippe Grandjean
Author Affiliation
Department of Hygiene, Akita University School of Medicine, Japan.
Source
Risk Anal. 2002 Jun;22(3):465-74
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem - drug effects
Female
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Male
Maternal Exposure
Mercury - analysis
Methylmercury Compounds - administration & dosage - toxicity
Portugal
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk assessment
Abstract
Delays in evoked potential latencies were observed at increased exposures to methylmercury from seafood in two cohorts of children. Because this outcome parameter appeared to be virtually independent of confounders, including cultural differences, a joint analysis of benchmark doses was carried out. Comparable cohort members included 382 Faroese and 113 Madeiran children without middle ear infection or neurological disease at age seven years. Maternal hair-mercury concentrations at parturition in the Faroese cohort ranged from 0.6 to 39.1 microg/g (geometric average, 4.49 microg/g). In Madeira, mothers who had not changed their diet since pregnancy had current hair-mercury concentrations ranging from 1.1 to 54.4 microg/g (geometric average 10.14 microg/g). The mercury-associated delay in peak III latencies at two frequencies (20 and 40 Hz) showed similar regression equations in the two groups of children, and benchmark dose calculations were therefore carried out for the two groups separately and jointly. For a doubling of a 5% prevalence of abnormal results of the peak III latencies at 40 Hz in a linear dose-response model, the benchmark dose for the maternal hair-mercury concentration was 8.79 microg/g for the Faroese children; 8.04 microg/g for the Madeiran children; and 9.46 microg/g for both groups. Results were similar for the 20 Hz condition. Benchmark dose results were substantially lower using a logarithmic or square root curve function, although the difference in fit between the curves was far from statistically significant. The benchmark results using evoked potential latencies are in close agreement with results based on neuropsychological test performance.
PubMed ID
12088226 View in PubMed
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Brainstem auditory-evoked potentials of 8-year-old preterm children in relation to their psycholinguistic abilities and MRI findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31280
Source
Early Hum Dev. 2002 Dec;70(1-2):25-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Päivi Olsén
Anneli Yliherva
Eija Pääkkö
Marjo Riitta Järvelin
Uolevi Tolonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital of Oulu, PL 23, 90029, Oulu, Finland. paivi.olsen@oulu.fi
Source
Early Hum Dev. 2002 Dec;70(1-2):25-34
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain - pathology
Cerebral Palsy
Child
Cohort Studies
Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - physiology - psychology
Language Development
Language Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Language Tests
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Psycholinguistics
Psychomotor Performance - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Brainstem auditory potential (BAEP) has been used to demonstrate brainstem damage and to provide prognosis for the outcome for newborn children. There are contradictory results of its power to predict problems in language development or problems at school. It is well known that preterm children experience an excess of these problems. AIM: To study if BAEP findings of 8-year-old preterm children differ from those of the full-term born control children and whether there is correlation to their linguistic problems or to the findings in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). STUDY DESIGN: Population-based cohort study. SUBJECTS: Forty-two preterm children aged 8 years born with birth weight 2500 g, 24 of whom had BAEP recordings and MRI. OUTCOME MEASURES: Differences in BAEPs between the preterm and the control children. Correlation of BAEPs with linguistic problems and with MRI findings. RESULTS: No differences were found in the absolute latencies nor in the interpeak intervals and in the I/V amplitude ratio. Nor did the results differ even when cerebral palsy disabled preterm children, preterm children with mild neurodevelopmental dysfunction or healthy preterm children were compared to each other or to the control children. No correlation to the linguistic problems or to the findings of periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) in MRI or to the different measurements of the brainstem were found. CONCLUSION: If hearing impairment does not exist, BAEP does not give further information on neurodevelopmental nor linguistic problems of the preterm children.
PubMed ID
12441202 View in PubMed
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Brainstem auditory evoked potential, visual evoked potential and nerve conduction velocity and their relation with HbA1c and beta 2 microglobulin in children with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35642
Source
Turk J Pediatr. 1994 Oct-Dec;36(4):279-87
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Akinci
G. Deda
U. Karagöl
T. Teziç
Author Affiliation
Dr. Sami Ulus Children's Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
Source
Turk J Pediatr. 1994 Oct-Dec;36(4):279-87
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - physiopathology
Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem
Evoked Potentials, Visual
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Neural Conduction
beta 2-Microglobulin - analysis
Abstract
Brain stem auditory evoked response (BAER), visual evoked response (VER) and nerve conduction velocities (NCV) were studied in 18 insulin-dependent diabetic children between the ages of 3.5 and 16 years (mean 9.0 +/- 3.2 years). The results were compared with those of age-matched controls. The VER latencies of the diabetic children in the right eye and left eye were significantly prolonged when compared with the control group. NCV of n. peroneus and the latency of sensorial n. medianus were significantly impaired when compared with the control group. Although the latencies of waves III, IV and V of the right ear and the interpeak latencies of I-III, I-V, III-V of both ears were prolonged, the comparison with the control group was not significant. The beta 2 microglobulin levels of the diabetic patients were significantly higher than those of the control group. There was a positive correlation between the beta 2 microglobulin and the BAER interpeak latencies of wave III-V in both ears (r: 0.51 p
PubMed ID
7825233 View in PubMed
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37 records – page 1 of 4.