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Acting on audit & feedback: a qualitative instrumental case study in mental health services in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295007
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 01 31; 18(1):71
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-31-2018
Author
Monica Stolt Pedersen
Anne Landheim
Merete Møller
Lars Lien
Author Affiliation
Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Concurrent Substance Abuse and Mental Health Disorders, Innlandet Hospital Trust, P.B. 104, 2340, Brumunddal, Norway. monica.stolt.pedersen@sykehuset-innlandet.no.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 01 31; 18(1):71
Date
01-31-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Benchmarking
Evidence-Based Practice
Feedback
Health Personnel
Humans
Medical Audit
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation - therapy
Mental Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Norway
Organizational Case Studies
Qualitative Research
Quality Improvement
Abstract
The National Guideline for Assessment, Treatment and Social Rehabilitation of Persons with Concurrent Substance Use and Mental Health Disorders, launched in 2012, is to be implemented in mental health services in Norway. Audit and feedback (A&F) is commonly used as the starting point of an implementation process. It aims to measure the research-practice gap, but its effect varies greatly. Less is known of how audit and feedback is used in natural settings. The aim of this study was to describe and investigate what is discussed and thematised when Quality Improvement (QI) teams in a District Psychiatric Centre (DPC) work to complete an action form as part of an A&F cycle in 2014.
This was an instrumental multiple case study involving four units in a DPC in Norway. We used open non-participant observation of QI team meetings in their natural setting, a total of seven teams and eleven meetings.
The discussions provided health professionals with insight into their own and their colleagues' practices. They revealed insufficient knowledge of substance-related disorders and experienced unclear role expectations. We found differences in how professional groups sought answers to questions of clinical practice and that they were concerned about whether new tasks fitted in with their routine ways of working.
Acting on A&F provided an opportunity to discuss practice in general, enhancing awareness of good practice. There was a general need for arenas to relate to practice and QI team meetings after A&F may well be a suitable arena for this. Self-assessment audits seem valuable, particular in areas where no benchmarked data exists, and there is a demand for implementation of new guidelines that might change routines and develop new roles. QI teams could benefit from having a unit leader present at meetings. Nurses and social educators and others turn to psychiatrists or psychologists for answers to clinical and organisational questions beyond guidelines, and show less confidence or routine in seeking research-based information. There is a general need to emphasise training in evidence-based practice and information seeking behaviour for all professional groups.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29386020 View in PubMed
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Activating knowledge for patient safety practices: a Canadian academic-policy partnership.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129005
Source
Worldviews Evid Based Nurs. 2012 Feb;9(1):49-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Margaret B Harrison
Wendy Nicklin
Marie Owen
Christina Godfrey
Janice McVeety
Val Angus
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. margaret.b.harrison@queensu.ca
Source
Worldviews Evid Based Nurs. 2012 Feb;9(1):49-58
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees - organization & administration - standards
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Evidence-Based Practice - methods - organization & administration - standards
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods - organization & administration - standards
Safety Management - methods - organization & administration - standards
State Medicine - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
Over the past decade, the need for healthcare delivery systems to identify and address patient safety issues has been propelled to the forefront. A Canadian survey, for example, demonstrated patient safety to be a major concern of frontline nurses (Nicklin & McVeety 2002). Three crucial patient safety elements, current knowledge, resources, and context of care have been identified by the World Health Organization (WHO 2009). To develop strategies to respond to the scope and mandate of the WHO report within the Canadian context, a pan-Canadian academic-policy partnership has been established.
This newly formed Pan-Canadian Partnership, the Queen's Joanna Briggs Collaboration for Patient Safety (referred throughout as "QJBC" or "the Partnership"), includes the Queen's University School of Nursing, Accreditation Canada, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI), the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and is supported by an active and committed advisory council representing over 10 national organizations representing all sectors of the health continuum, including patients/families advocacy groups, professional associations, and other bodies. This unique partnership is designed to provide timely, focused support from academia to the front line of patient safety. QJBC has adopted an "integrated knowledge translation" approach to identify and respond to patient safety priorities and to ensure active engagement with stakeholders in producing and using available knowledge. Synthesis of evidence and guideline adaptation methodologies are employed to access quantitative and qualitative evidence relevant to pertinent patient safety questions and subsequently, to respond to issues of feasibility, meaningfulness, appropriateness/acceptability, and effectiveness.
This paper describes the conceptual grounding of the Partnership, its proposed methods, and its plan for action. It is hoped that our journey may provide some guidance to others as they develop patient safety models within their own arenas.
PubMed ID
22151727 View in PubMed
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[Actual problem of methodology and development of evidence-based health risk assessment associated with chemical exposure].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290154
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(8):711-6
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
S M Novikov
M V Fokin
T N Unguryanu
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(8):711-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Environmental Exposure - prevention & control - standards
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - standards
Evidence-Based Practice
Hazardous Substances - analysis - standards
Humans
Hygiene - standards
Public Health - methods
Risk Assessment - methods - standards
Russia
Abstract
Paramount problems of the development of the assessment of population health risks associated with the chemical exposure in Russia are considered on the ground of critical analysis of reports devoted to methodological issues of the risk assessment and guidelines published since 2010. Causes of the lack in progress of risk assessment are discussed. The information of executed research revealed the significant retardation number of Russian publications devoted to the evidence-based health risk assessment compare to worldwide trend. The analysis of publications according to evidence-based health risk assessment in Russia in 1998 - 2012 demonstrated methodical problems to be leading to the underestimation of the real risk to population’s health. There are demonstrated directions in the renewal of methodology and practice of hygienic standardization on the basis of the risk assessment. The comparative analysis of values of uncertainty factors (modifying factors, conversion factors) used for extrapolation and accepted in different countries and organizations was made. The system of extrapolation coefficients of DNEL (Derive No-Effect Level) is presented. The leading principles of modern toxicology and risk assessment based on strict scientific proofs are showed. Criteria of evidence-based toxicology and risk assessment are presented.Among actual problems which demand their decision there are considered: the assessment of combined action in regulatory toxicology; expansion of spheres of the application of health risk assessment methodology; the improvement ofpreparation and certification of experts in the field of health risk assessment; need of check of dispersion models and their replacement by more modern models; the improvement of exposure assessment with taking into account the international requirements; the assessment of regional exposure factors; expansion of atmospheric air monitoring in all the large cities of Russia.
PubMed ID
29430892 View in PubMed
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Addressing implementation challenges during guideline development - a case study of Swedish national guidelines for methods of preventing disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277834
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2015 Jan 22;15:19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-22-2015
Author
Linda Richter-Sundberg
Therese Kardakis
Lars Weinehall
Rickard Garvare
Monica E Nyström
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2015 Jan 22;15:19
Date
Jan-22-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Consensus
Evidence-Based Practice - organization & administration - standards
Health promotion - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Quality of Health Care
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sweden
Abstract
Many of the world's life threatening diseases (e.g. cancer, heart disease, stroke) could be prevented by eliminating life-style habits such as tobacco use, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity and excessive alcohol use. Incorporating evidence-based research on methods to change unhealthy lifestyle habits in clinical practice would be equally valuable. However gaps between guideline development and implementation are well documented, with implications for health care quality, safety and effectiveness. The development phase of guidelines has been shown to be important both for the quality in guideline content and for the success of implementation. There are, however, indications that guidelines related to general disease prevention methods encounter specific barriers compared to guidelines that are diagnosis-specific. In 2011 the Swedish National board for Health and Welfare launched guidelines with a preventive scope. The aim of this study was to investigate how implementation challenges were addressed during the development process of these disease preventive guidelines.
Seven semi-structured interviews were conducted with members of the guideline development management group. Archival data detailing the guideline development process were also collected and used in the analysis. Qualitative data were analysed using content analysis as the analytical framework.
The study identified several strategies and approaches that were used to address implementation challenges during guideline development. Four themes emerged from the analysis: broad agreements and consensus about scope and purpose; a formalized and structured development procedure; systematic and active involvement of stakeholders; and openness and transparency in the specific guideline development procedure. Additional factors concerning the scope of prevention and the work environment of guideline developers were perceived to influence the possibilities to address implementation issues.
This case study provides examples of how guideline developers perceive and approach the issue of implementation during the development and early launch of prevention guidelines. Models for guideline development could benefit from an initial assessment of how the guideline topic, its target context and stakeholders will affect the upcoming implementation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25608684 View in PubMed
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Advancing Evidence-Based Practice in Physical Therapy Settings: Multinational Perspectives on Implementation Strategies and Interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286008
Source
Phys Ther. 2017 Jan 01;97(1):51-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-01-2017
Author
Susanne Bernhardsson
Elizabeth Lynch
Janine Margarita Dizon
Jasmin Fernandes
Consuelo Gonzalez-Suarez
Lucylynn Lizarondo
Julie Luker
Louise Wiles
Karen Grimmer
Source
Phys Ther. 2017 Jan 01;97(1):51-60
Date
Jan-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia
Clinical Decision-Making - methods
Evidence-Based Practice - methods - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Philippines
Physical Therapy Specialty - methods - organization & administration
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Research
Sweden
Abstract
It is of critical importance that findings from the wealth of clinical physical therapist research are transferred into clinical practice without unnecessary delays. There is a lack of knowledge about strategies that can be used to effectively implement physical therapist research findings and evidence-based practice (EBP) into everyday clinical practice in different national settings and contexts. The purpose of this article is to contribute to knowledge about effective strategies for implementing EBP that have been studied in different national physical therapy settings. The specific aims of this article are to share experiences and provide a current multinational perspective on different approaches and strategies for implementing EBP and to highlight important considerations and implications for both research and practice. Six research studies from various settings in 3 countries are described and synthesized. Key characteristics of the studies and intervention components are tabulated and mapped to the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care taxonomy. Commonalities and differences are presented. The implementation strategies described were: a theory-based guideline implementation tailored to identified barriers and facilitators; a multifaceted EBP training package; journal clubs; a multifaceted strategy comprising contextualized procedures, protocols, and standardized resources; barrier identification, education, audit, feedback, and reminders; and contextualized guidelines. Commonalities were the use of a multifaceted approach, educational measures, and clinical guidelines. Key outcomes across the studies were improved attitudes and increased awareness, knowledge, skills, and confidence in EBP; better access to clinical practice guidelines and other EBP resources; identification of barriers that could be targeted in future implementation activities; earlier referrals; and use of recommended outcome measures. The article can serve as a template for other physical therapist researchers in designing implementation studies, as well as to inform policies and practice for health care managers and decision makers who are looking for ways to implement research findings in their organizations.
PubMed ID
27515942 View in PubMed
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The Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative: improving the cardiac patient journey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146165
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:85-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Robyn Blackadar
Mishaela Houle
Author Affiliation
Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative.
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:85-90
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Benchmarking - organization & administration
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Coronary Artery Bypass
Evidence-Based Practice
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Plan Implementation
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Heart Diseases - therapy
Humans
National health programs - organization & administration
Organizational Case Studies
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Systems Integration
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Waiting Lists
Abstract
The Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative (ACAC) is a joint initiative of Alberta's health system to improve access to adult cardiac services across the patient journey. ACAC has created new care delivery models and implemented best practices across Alberta in four streams across the continuum: heart attack, patient navigation, heart failure and arrhythmia. Emergency medical providers, nurses, primary care physicians, hospitals, cardiac specialists and clinicians are all working together to integrate services, bridge jurisdictions and geography with one aim--improving the patient journey for adults in need of cardiac care.
PubMed ID
20057256 View in PubMed
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Alberta's systems approach to chronic disease management and prevention utilizing the expanded chronic care model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146163
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:98-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Sandra Delon
Blair Mackinnon
Author Affiliation
Chronic Disease Prevention & Oral Health, Alberta Health Services.
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:98-104
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Consumer Participation
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Decision Support Techniques
Disease Management
Evidence-Based Practice
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Humans
Long-Term Care
Models, organizational
National Health Programs
Organizational Case Studies
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Participation
Patient-Centered Care
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Self Care
Systems Integration
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Abstract
Alberta's integrated approach to chronic disease management programming embraces client-centred care, supports self-management and facilitates care across the continuum. This paper presents strategies implemented through collaboration with primary care to improve care of individuals with chronic conditions, evaluation evidence supporting success and lessons learned from the Alberta perspective.
PubMed ID
20057258 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-attributed disease burden and alcohol policies in the BRICS-countries during the years 1990-2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290723
Source
J Glob Health. 2017 Jun; 7(1):010404
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Rynaz Rabiee
Emilie Agardh
Matthew M Coates
Peter Allebeck
Anna-Karin Danielsson
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Public Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Glob Health. 2017 Jun; 7(1):010404
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - blood - trends
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology - mortality
Brazil
China
Cost of Illness
Disabled Persons
Evidence-Based Practice
Female
Humans
India
Male
Public Policy
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Russia
South Africa
Abstract
We aimed to assess alcohol consumption and alcohol-attributed disease burden by DALYs (disability adjusted life years) in the BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) between 1990 and 2013, and explore to what extent these countries have implemented evidence-based alcohol policies during the same time period.
A comparative risk assessment approach and literature review, within a setting of the BRICS countries. Participants were the total populations (males and females combined) of each country. Levels of alcohol consumption, age-standardized alcohol-attributable DALYs per 100?000 and alcohol policy documents were measured.
The alcohol-attributed disease burden mirrors level of consumption in Brazil, Russia and India, to some extent in China, but not in South Africa. Between the years 1990-2013 DALYs per 100 000 decreased in Brazil (from 2124 to 1902), China (from 1719 to 1250) and South Africa (from 2926 to 2662). An increase was observed in Russia (from 4015 to 4719) and India (from 1574 to 1722). Policies were implemented in all of the BRICS countries and the most common were tax increases, drink-driving measures and restrictions on advertisement.
There was an overall decrease in alcohol-related DALYs in Brazil, China and South Africa, while an overall increase was observed in Russia and India. Most notably is the change in DALYs in Russia, where a distinct increase from 1990-2005 was followed by a steady decrease from 2005-2013. Even if assessment of causality cannot be done, policy changes were generally followed by changes in alcohol-attributed disease burden. This highlights the importance of more detailed research on this topic.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28400952 View in PubMed
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American Indian culture as substance abuse treatment: pursuing evidence for a local intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126323
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):291-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Joseph P Gone
Patrick E Calf Looking
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, 2239 East Hall, 530 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1043, USA. jgone@umich.edu
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):291-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Culture
Evidence-Based Practice
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Residential Treatment
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - therapy
Abstract
Contemporary tribal commitments to traditional cultural reclamation and revitalization find continued expression by recent generational cohorts of American Indians who, when it comes to matters of recovery, healing, and wellness in the context of substance abuse, routinely assert that "our culture is our treatment." And yet, empirical investigations of this culture-as-treatment hypothesis--namely, that a (post)colonial return to indigenous cultural orientations and practices is sufficient for effecting abstinence and recovery from substance use disorders for many American Indians--have yet to appear in the scientific literature. Preliminary activities of a research partnership dedicated to the empirical exploration of this hypothesis for reducing Native American substance use disorders are summarized. Specifically, collaboration between a university-based research psychologist and a reservation-based substance abuse treatment program staff has thus far resulted in a detailed blueprint for a radically alternative, culturally-grounded intervention developed for reservation residents. This proposed alternative intervention--a seasonal cultural immersion camp designed to approximate the day-to-day experiences of prereservation ancestors--was designed for eventual implementation and evaluation with adult clients referred for residential treatment on the Blackfeet Indian reservation. It is anticipated that the proposed intervention will eventually afford empirical evaluation of the culture-as-treatment hypothesis.
PubMed ID
22400459 View in PubMed
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American Indian perspectives on evidence-based practice implementation: results from a statewide Tribal Mental Health Gathering.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277764
Source
Adm Policy Ment Health. 2015 Jan;42(1):29-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Sarah Cusworth Walker
Ron Whitener
Eric W Trupin
Natalie Migliarini
Source
Adm Policy Ment Health. 2015 Jan;42(1):29-39
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation - methods
Cultural Competency
Evidence-Based Practice - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Washington
Abstract
Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices (EBP) within American Indian and Alaskan Natives communities is currently an area of debate and contention. There is considerable concern about expanding EBP policy mandates to AI/AN communities as these mandates, either through funding restrictions or other de facto policies, recall past histories of clinical colonization and exploitation by the state and federal government. As a response, work is being done to evaluate indigenous programs and examine strategies for culturally-sensitive implementation. While the literature reflects the perspectives of AI/AN populations on EBP generally, no one has yet reported the perspectives of AI/AN communities on how to feasibly achieve widespread EBP implementation. We report the findings of a statewide Tribal Gathering focused on behavioral health interventions for youth. The Gathering participants included AI/AN individuals as well as staff working with AI/AN populations in tribal communities. Participants identified strengths and weaknesses of the five legislatively fundable programs for youth delinquency in Washington State and discussed strategies likely to be effective in promoting increased uptake within tribes. Analysis of these discussions resulted in many useful insights in program-specific and community-driven strategies for implementation. In addition, two major themes emerged regarding widespread uptake: the importance of a multi-phase engagement strategy and adopting a consortium/learning community model for implementation. The findings from this Gathering offer important lessons that can inform current work regarding strategies to achieve a balance of program fidelity and cultural-alignment. Attending to engagement practices at the governance, community and individual level are likely to be key components of tribal-focused implementation. Further, efforts to embed implementation within a consortium or learning community hold considerable promise as a strategy for sustainability.
PubMed ID
24242820 View in PubMed
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