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1273 records – page 1 of 128.

A 1-year evaluation of Syva MicroTrak Chlamydia enzyme immunoassay with selective confirmation by direct fluorescent-antibody assay in a high-volume laboratory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217461
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1994 Sep;32(9):2208-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
E L Chan
K. Brandt
G B Horsman
Author Affiliation
Laboratory and Disease Control Services, Saskatchewan Health, Regina, Canada.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1994 Sep;32(9):2208-11
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Chlamydia Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - immunology - isolation & purification
Cost Control
Densitometry
Diagnostic Tests, Routine - economics
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Fluorescent Antibody Technique - economics
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques - economics
Male
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Seasons
Sensitivity and specificity
Urethritis - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Uterine Cervicitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
TThe Syva MicroTrak Chlamydia enzyme immunoassay (EIA; Syva Company, San Jose, Calif.) with cytospin and direct fluorescent-antibody assay (DFA) confirmation was evaluated on 43,630 urogenital specimens over a 1-year period in the Provincial Laboratory in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. This was a two-phase study intended to define a testing algorithm for Chlamydia trachomatis that would be both highly accurate and cost-effective in our high-volume (> 3,000 tests per month) laboratory. The prevalence of C. trachomatis infection in our population is moderate (8 to 9%). In phase 1, we tested 6,022 male and female urogenital specimens by EIA. All specimens with optical densities above the cutoff value and those within 30% below the cutoff value were retested by DFA. This was 648 specimens (10.8% of the total). A total of 100% (211 of 211) of the specimens with optical densities equal to or greater than 1.00 absorbance unit (AU) above the cutoff value, 98.2% (175 of 178) of the specimens with optical densities of between 0.500 and 0.999 AU above the cutoff value, and 83% (167 of 201) of the specimens with optical densities within 0.499 AU above the cutoff value were confirmed to be positive. A total of 12% (7 of 58) of the specimens with optical densities within 30% below the cutoff value were positive by DFA. In phase 2, we tested 37,608 specimens (32,495 from females; 5,113 from males) by EIA. Only those specimens with optical densities of between 0.499 AU above and 30% below the cutoff value required confirmation on the basis of data from phase 1 of the study. This was 4.5% of all specimens tested. This decrease in the proportion of specimens requiring confirmation provides a significant cost savings to the laboratory. The testing algorithm gives us a 1-day turnaround time to the final confirmed test results. The MicroTrak EIA performed very well in both phases of the study, with a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 96.1, 99.1, 90.3, and 99.7%, respectively, in phase 2. We suggest that for laboratories that use EIA for Chlamydia testing, a study such as this one will identify an appropriate optical density range for confirmatory testing for samples from that particular population.
Notes
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 1983;5:96-1236357824
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1993 Jun;31(6):1646-78315010
Cites: Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 1992 Nov-Dec;15(8):663-81478048
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1990 Nov;28(11):2473-62254422
PubMed ID
7814548 View in PubMed
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[2-stage treatment of acute pneumonia patients with rehabilitation at the sanatorial stage].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239433
Source
Ter Arkh. 1985;57(3):133-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
Iu N Shteingardt
T N Zaripova
T S Ageeva
N A Mal'kov
N A Goreva
Source
Ter Arkh. 1985;57(3):133-5
Date
1985
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Health Resorts
Humans
Length of Stay
Methods
Middle Aged
Mud Therapy
Pneumonia - etiology - therapy
Siberia
Abstract
A total of 73 patients with acute pneumonia received two-stage treatment: etiotropic treatment based on early etiological diagnosis (at hospital) and subsequent early rehabilitation at sanatorium with the use of peloid therapy. It made it possible to attain the best short-term results in the treatment of pneumonias (as compared with control group patients), to shorten 2-4-fold the times of the patients' stay at hospital and to raise bed capacity, to reduce the total doses and duration of antibacterial therapy, to decrease the possibility of the allergic reactions and side effects, and to reduce 2-fold the cost of antibacterial therapy.
PubMed ID
4002155 View in PubMed
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[4 years of experiences with Karbase. A tool for quality development in vascular surgery].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216878
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Nov 21;156(47):7032-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-21-1994
Author
L P Jensen
T V Schroeder
J E Lorentzen
P V Madsen
Author Affiliation
Karkirurgisk afdeling, Rigshospitalet, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Nov 21;156(47):7032-5
Date
Nov-21-1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Registries
Risk factors
Surgical Wound Infection - epidemiology
Vascular Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Karbase, a Danish register for vascular surgery is presented with data from four years experience. The register consists of 65 variables centered on risk factors, the perioperative course as well as follow-up information. During the four-year period 1989-1992 a total of 4902 admissions were registered in 3810 patients. Surgery was performed during 4005 admissions. Output data from Karbase is presented with results on survival and postoperative complications, related to preoperative risk factors. The incidence of surgical wound infections was 3.9%, with a significant reduction during the years (p = 0.004). Karbase is now used by all vascular surgical units in Denmark. We conclude that the establishment of a continuous registration has been beneficial to the department. We have achieved valid data on treatment, outcome and complications in relation to individual risk factors. In the future the use of Karbase will be extended with the aim of further quality development, locally as well as nation wide.
PubMed ID
7817410 View in PubMed
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[5-year experience with a clinic for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208414
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 May 20;117(13):1892-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1997
Author
J A Aarli
O B Tysnes
Author Affiliation
Nevrologisk avdeling, Haukeland Sykehus, Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 May 20;117(13):1892-5
Date
May-20-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Hospital Units
Humans
Norway
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Patient Education as Topic
Abstract
An out-patient service for patients suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the ALS-clinic, was established at the Department of Neurology, Haukeland Hospital, in 1990. The number of ALS patients who were hospitalised during the period 1990-1995 was 59, with a mean stay in hospital of 14.8 days. Eleven of the patients died in hospital. The ALS-clinic had 127 consultations during the same period, with a mean of 2.2 consultations per patient. Speech difficulties were the dominating problem at 26 of the consultations. 32 patients experienced feeding difficulties, and a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was performed in nine cases. Respiratory problems dominated in ten patients, but only two of these patients wanted a home ventilator. Various assistive devices were adapted for 16 patients.
PubMed ID
9214008 View in PubMed
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[15th year of the Reach to Recovery Program in Russia: analysis of activity and evaluation of effectiveness (exemplified by the St. Petersburg experience)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168964
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2005;51(5):612-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005

25 years' experience with lymphangiomas in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201178
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 1999 Jul;34(7):1164-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
A. Alqahtani
L T Nguyen
H. Flageole
K. Shaw
J M Laberge
Author Affiliation
The Montreal Children's Hospital, Department of Surgery, McGill University, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 1999 Jul;34(7):1164-8
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Head and Neck Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Lymphangioma - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Male
Mediastinal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Quebec - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The management of lymphangioma in children is challenging because complete resection is difficult to achieve in some cases, and recurrences are common. The authors reviewed their experience to assess the risk factors for recurrence and the role of nonoperative treatment.
A retrospective study over a period of 25 years was carried out. One hundred eighty-six patients with 191 lesions (five patients with de novo lesions in different sites) were treated. There were 98 boys and 88 girls. The average age at diagnosis was 3.3 years (range, fetal life to 17 years) and the average size 8 cm in diameter. Histocytological confirmation was obtained in all patients. The involved sites were head and neck, 89 patients (48%); trunk and extremities, 78 patients (42%); internal or visceral locations (eg, abdominal and thorax), 19 patients (10%). The treatment consisted of macroscopically complete excision in 145 patients (150 lesions, of which five were recurrences in different sites), partial excision in 10 patients, aspiration in five patients, laser excision in 10 patients, biopsy only in four patients, drainage and biopsy in two patients, and injection of sclerosing agents in 10 patients.
There were 54 recurrences; 44 underwent excision (five of them more than once), and five regressed spontaneously on follow-up. Five other recurrences were stable and not progressing. Recurrences, (defined as clinically obvious disease), were found to be 100% after aspiration, 100% after injection, 40% after incomplete excision, 40% after laser excision, and 17% after macroscopically complete excision. The recurrence rate in the last group was the highest in the head (33%), the least in the internal locations (0%), and intermediate for the cervical location (13%). There were no significant differences, in terms of outcome, between those who had their surgery immediately at the time of diagnosis (n = 101) and those who had delayed surgery (n = 85).
There were fewer recurrences after macroscopically complete excision. Aspiration and injection had the highest recurrence rate. Risk factors for recurrence included location, size, and complexity of lesions. A period of observation may be useful for infants to facilitate complete excision. In the present series, spontaneous regression was infrequent and was seen more often with recurrent lesions.
PubMed ID
10442614 View in PubMed
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The academic organization of residency programs: the evaluation of the effect of "service" responsibilities upon the residency program; the influence of personal responsibility of a "chief" for the resident compared with the "system" approach to resident education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111652
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Oct 8;95(15):760-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-8-1966
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Oct 8;95(15):760-2
Date
Oct-8-1966
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Hospitalization
Humans
Internship and Residency
Medical Staff, Hospital
Universities
PubMed ID
5926143 View in PubMed
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Accuracy and reliability of 'specialized' physical therapists in auscultating tape-recorded lung sounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219667
Source
Physiother Can. 1993;45(1):21-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
D. Brooks
L. Wilson
C. Kelsey
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Toronto.
Source
Physiother Can. 1993;45(1):21-4
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Auscultation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Clinical Competence - standards - statistics & numerical data
Diagnostic Errors
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Ontario
Physical Therapy Modalities - classification - standards - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Respiratory Function Tests - standards - statistics & numerical data
Tape Recording
Abstract
This study investigated the accuracy and inter-rater reliability of 'specialized' physical therapists in the auscultation of tape-recorded lung sounds. In addition, a correlation was investigated between accuracy of interpretation and the number of years of specialization in the field of cardiorespiratory physical therapy. This research follows an earlier study which investigated the accuracy and inter-rater reliability of auscultating tape-recorded lung sounds in a 'non-specialized' cohort of physical therapists. The subjects were 26 'specialized' cardiorespiratory physical therapists working in acute urban teaching hospitals. These individuals were required to have been practising currently and exclusively for at least one year in the area of cardiorespiratory physical therapy. Participants listened with a stethoscope to five different sounds and identified them from a standardized list of terms. One of three tapes with the same lung sounds in different order was randomly selected for each physical therapist. The percentage of correct answers for all subjects was calculated. An accurate response in the detection of lung sounds was arbitrarily defined as a percentage of correct answers of 70% or greater. The difference between the pooled correct response rate of 50% and the arbitrarily set value of 70% was statistically significant (z = 2.23, p
PubMed ID
10124337 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of dental registrations in forensic odontology among dentists and dental students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218003
Source
J Forensic Odontostomatol. 1994 Jun;12(1):12-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
L P Sand
L G Rasmusson
H. Borrman
Author Affiliation
Goteborg University, Faculty of Odontology, Sweden.
Source
J Forensic Odontostomatol. 1994 Jun;12(1):12-4
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Dental Records
Dentists
Education, Dental
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Forensic Dentistry - methods
Humans
Observer Variation
Reproducibility of Results
Students, Dental
Sweden
Abstract
In forensic odontology, registration of dental characteristics is crucial in the identification procedure. It has been found that the most common errors made are incorrect registration of restorations and confusion about premolars and molars in both jaws. In an earlier study, dental students were observers and the charting was made without radiographs. However, in practical forensic work dentists make the registrations and radiographs are usually available. In this investigation eight dental students and eight dentists made registrations on ten excised macerated jaws with the aid of radiographs. The mean number of errors for each jaw for the students and the dentist was 4 and 3 respectively. The most common error among the dentists was incorrect registration of restorations, while errors on registrations of missing teeth were most common among the students. Even though the material in this study was limited, the results indicate the importance of re-examining of postmortem findings before the comparison with the antemortem data is done. Additionally, the forensic work should be performed by specialists.
PubMed ID
9227084 View in PubMed
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[A colostomy plug (the Conseal system). Assessment of early postoperative use].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221442
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Mar 15;155(11):797-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1993
Author
E. Waever
S. Bülow
F A Moesgaard
Author Affiliation
Kirurgisk afdeling C, Rigshospitalet, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Mar 15;155(11):797-9
Date
Mar-15-1993
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Colostomy - adverse effects - instrumentation
Denmark
Equipment Failure
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Time Factors
Abstract
The Conseal plug was evaluated in a four week period among 30 consecutive colostomy patients. The clinical trial, a multicenter study covering 11 Danish Hospitals, was started five to 12 days postoperatively among motivated patients in good physical condition. Twenty patients (67%) completed the trial. Ten patients (33%) gave up because of wound infection, leakage, extrusion of the foam part or fault in the test procedure. At the end of the trial all 20 patients wanted to continue using the plug and 84% were still using the Conseal system six months later. We conclude that the plug is well tolerated among motivated patients less than a week postoperatively and that the Conseal plug is a good alternative to the colostomy bag early in the postoperative course.
PubMed ID
8460431 View in PubMed
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1273 records – page 1 of 128.