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83 records – page 1 of 9.

Source
Wien Med Wochenschr. 1995;145(6):143-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
K H Beine
Author Affiliation
Hans-Prinzhorn-Klinik, Hemer.
Source
Wien Med Wochenschr. 1995;145(6):143-7
Date
1995
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Austria
Cause of Death
English Abstract
Euthanasia - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Homicide - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Liability, Legal
Male
Nursing Staff, Hospital - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Care Team - legislation & jurisprudence
Professional Impairment - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The phenomenon of patient homicides committed by health service employees has, in the previous years, repeatedly aroused much attention. The cases made known in Germany, the USA, Holland, Norway, and Austria appear to provide evidence to the effect that we are not only dealing with unique incidents. The scientific investigation of this especially sensitive taboo-topic is, to date, missing. The judicial trials carried out emphatically indicate that culprit motives, colleague behavior, but also to a large extent decisions made by superiors remain unclear. It remains controversial, what effect working conditions, strain of employees, their level of education and personal viewpoints over such criminal acts they possess. Finally, the long latency period between the first internal suspicions and the responsible parties' appropriate reactions requires duplicatable explanation. The following paper presents a German single-case study of patient homicide by a female nurse. The focus on causality rests on the presentation of developments up to the point where the long-fermenting suspicion could no longer be dismissed, and appropriate consequences took place. The account largely avoids the "definite" findings required during the judicial process. It concerns rather above all an open, uncertain, and possibly without external influence course of development which in stages each colleague in the health professions can trace, to the point where the uncertain and horrifying suspicion became a certainty. With this single-case study in hand it is made understandable in which ways personal circumstances and professional conditions at the worksituation can intertwine in such a way that the original motivation to help turns into its abysmal opposite. It is the author's intention to make preventive learning possible through this single case study. Every employee in the health professions should proceed on the assumption that such occurrences could also in his own field of work come to pass. In this respect, it is of considerable importance to differentiate between hasty and untenable incriminations and original increasing early-warning signs.
PubMed ID
7785282 View in PubMed
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[A contribution to the euthanasia debate: the law and the self-chosen death]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68471
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Aug 28;93(35):2915-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-28-1996
Author
M K Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Socialrätt vid Lunds universitet.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Aug 28;93(35):2915-7
Date
Aug-28-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Euthanasia - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Physician's Role
Right to Die
Suicide, Assisted - legislation & jurisprudence
Sweden
PubMed ID
8815343 View in PubMed
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Active and passive euthanasia: the cases of Drs. Claudio Alberto de la Rocha and Nancy Morrison.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202519
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Mar 23;160(6):857-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-23-1999
Author
D. Gorman
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto.
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Mar 23;160(6):857-60
Date
Mar-23-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Ethics, Medical
Euthanasia - legislation & jurisprudence
Euthanasia, Passive - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Malpractice - legislation & jurisprudence
Medical Futility
Patient Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Suicide, Assisted - legislation & jurisprudence
Notes
Cites: Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2000 Mar;14(2):157-6010720807
Cites: Philos Public Aff. 1977 Winter;6(2):85-11211663015
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1975 Jan 9;292(2):78-801109443
Comment In: CMAJ. 1999 Sep 21;161(6):68510513269
Comment In: CMAJ. 1999 Jul 13;161(1):18, 2010420857
PubMed ID
10189436 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Feb 20;157(8):1024-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-1995
Author
A P Folker
N. Hvidt
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Feb 20;157(8):1024-7
Date
Feb-20-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Euthanasia - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Patient Advocacy
Physician's Role
Quality of Life
Abstract
The growing interest in the subject of active euthanasia in connection with the debate regarding legalization of such practices in Denmark necessitates taking a definite standpoint. The difference in concept between active and passive euthanasia is stressed, and the Dutch guidelines are reviewed. The article discusses how far the patient's autonomy should go, as it regards the consideration of self-determination as being too narrow a criterion in itself. The discussion on the quality of life is included, and the consequences of the process of expulsion as a sociological concept are considered--the risk of a patient feeling guilty for being alive and therefore feeling compelled to request active euthanasia. The changed function of the physician is underlined, and it is discussed whether active euthansia will cause a breach of confidence between the physician and his patient. In connection with the debate the following tendencies in society are emphasized: lack of clarity, increasing medicalization and utilitarian priorities.
PubMed ID
7879300 View in PubMed
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Alberta euthanasia survey: 1. Physicians' opinions about the morality and legalization of active euthanasia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220932
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Jun 1;148(11):1921-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1993
Author
T D Kinsella
M J Verhoef
Author Affiliation
Office of Medical Bioethics, University of Calgary, Alta.
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Jun 1;148(11):1921-6
Date
Jun-1-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Euthanasia - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Medicine
Morals
Physician's Role
Questionnaires
Religion and Medicine
Specialization
Abstract
To ascertain the opinions of a sample of Alberta physicians about the morality and legalization of active euthanasia, the determinants of these opinions and the frequency and sources of requests for assistance in active euthanasia.
Cross-sectional survey of a random sample of Alberta physicians, grouped by site and type of practice.
Alberta.
A total of 2002 (46%) of the licensed physicians in Alberta were mailed a 38-item questionnaire in May through July 1991; usable responses were returned by 1391 (69%).
Of the respondents 44% did believe that it is sometimes right to practice active euthanasia; 46% did not. Moral acceptance of active euthanasia correlated with type of practice and religious affiliation and activity. In all, 28% of the physicians stated that they would practice active euthanasia if it were legalized, and 51% indicated that they would not. These opinions were significantly related to sex, religious affiliation and activity, and country of graduation. Just over half (51%) of the respondents stated that the law should be changed to permit patients to request active euthanasia. Requests (usually from patients) were reportedly received by 19% of the physicians, 78% of whom received fewer than five.
This survey revealed severely disparate opinions among Alberta physicians about the morality of active euthanasia. In particular, religious affiliation and activity were associated with the polarized opinions. The desire for active euthanasia, as inferred from requests by patients, was not frequent. Overall, there was no strong support expressed by the physicians for the personal practice of legalized active euthanasia. These data will be vital to those involved in health education and public policy formation about active euthanasia in Alberta and the rest of Canada.
Notes
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 1989 Jan-Feb;19(1):suppl 4-62714959
Cites: Med J Aust. 1988 Jun 20;148(12):623-73380042
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1988 Nov 17;319(20):1348-503185639
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1989 May;79(5):638-92705601
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 1991 Nov-Dec;21(6):21765459
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1990 Jun 28;322(26):1881-32348841
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1990 Sep 13;323(11):750-22388673
Cites: Lancet. 1991 Sep 14;338(8768):669-741715962
Comment In: CMAJ. 1993 Jun 1;148(11):1889-908500025
PubMed ID
8500029 View in PubMed
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Alberta euthanasia survey: 2. Physicians' opinions about the acceptance of active euthanasia as a medical act and the reporting of such practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220931
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Jun 1;148(11):1929-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1993
Author
M J Verhoef
T D Kinsella
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Alta.
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Jun 1;148(11):1929-33
Date
Jun-1-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Euthanasia - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Humans
Morals
Physician's Role
Questionnaires
Religion and Medicine
Abstract
To ascertain the opinions of Alberta physicians about the acceptance of active euthanasia as a medical act (the "medicalization" of active euthanasia) and the reporting of colleagues practising active euthanasia, as well as the sociodemographic correlates.
Cross-sectional survey of a random sample of Alberta physicians, grouped by site and type of practice.
Alberta.
A total of 2002 (46%) of the licensed physicians in Alberta were mailed a 38-item questionnaire in May through July 1991; usable responses were returned by 1391 (69%).
Although only 44% of the respondents considered active euthanasia morally "right" at least 70% opted to medicalize the practice if it were legal by restricting it to be performed by physicians and to be taught at medical sites. Even though active euthanasia is criminal homicide in Canada, 33% of the physicians stated that they would not report a colleague participating in the act of anyone, and 40% and 60% stated that they would not report a colleague to medical or legal authorities respectively. Acceptance or rejection of active euthanasia as a medical act was strongly related to religious affiliation and activity (p
Notes
Cites: Bull Am Coll Surg. 1989 Dec;74(12):6-9, 5610296521
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1990 Sep 13;323(11):750-22388673
Comment In: CMAJ. 1993 Jun 1;148(11):1889-908500025
PubMed ID
8500030 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A medical controversy on treatment withdrawal. Does the physician risk to be charged for killing? Only if he deviates from the medical society consensus].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226515
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Apr 10;88(15):1417-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-1991

An ethicist's commentary on the case of the veterinarian who euthanized an animal thinking that he had received owner permission.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211195
Source
Can Vet J. 1996 Sep;37(9):519-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996

[An inquiry among medical students. No to legalization of euthanasia, but yes to dropped charges or remission of sentence].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193453
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Aug 8;98(32-33):3417-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-8-2001
Author
T. Nilstun
Author Affiliation
Enheten för medicinsk etik, Lunds universitet. Tore.Nilstun@medetik.lu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Aug 8;98(32-33):3417-8
Date
Aug-8-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Death
Euthanasia - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Humans
Questionnaires
Students, Medical - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
In a questionnaire to medical students in Sweden, only 6 out of 135 answered that they wanted voluntary active euthanasia to be legalized. However, most of the students were of the opinion that the charges brought against the physician could be withdrawn pending assessment by a public prosecutor (55), or alternatively, that remission of sentence could be granted pending assessment by a court (45). A somewhat smaller group (26) answered that prison corresponding to the sentence for manslaughter was reasonable. Only 3 students considered voluntary active euthanasia to be murder. Legal monitoring of each case of active euthanasia was very important to these medical students, but many answered that under specific conditions there should be no punishment.
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2001 Sep 5;98(36):383911586820
PubMed ID
11526661 View in PubMed
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"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims": finding the essence of autonomy in assisted death laws.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131953
Source
Health Law Can. 2011 May-Jun;31(4):81-148
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mary J Shariff
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Law, University of Manitoba.
Source
Health Law Can. 2011 May-Jun;31(4):81-148
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Europe
Euthanasia - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Personal Autonomy
Suicide, Assisted - legislation & jurisprudence
United States
PubMed ID
21859048 View in PubMed
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83 records – page 1 of 9.