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1015 records – page 1 of 102.

Source
J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1992;(12):21-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
C. Hill
Author Affiliation
Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1992;(12):21-4
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Smoking - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Tobacco consumption in Europe can be estimated from several sources, including sales statistics and population surveys. The first source provides a reasonable estimate of total tobacco consumption, whereas the second gives estimates of the prevalence of smokers by sex and age. In 1950, daily cigarette consumption by adults in European countries varied between 1.7 in Portugal and 6.9 in Ireland, the corresponding US consumption being 8.9. In 1989, the variation was much smaller, ie, between 3.5 in the Netherlands and 10.1 in Greece. In the countries where consumption was high in 1950, maximum consumption was achieved around 1975, followed by stabilization or reduction. In other countries, where consumption was low in 1950, it is still increasing. In a 1987 European survey, the proportion of current smokers varied between 33% in Portugal and 46% in Denmark. Much of this difference comes from the low prevalence of smoking habits in the adult female population of southern Europe.
PubMed ID
1616805 View in PubMed
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Source
Schweiz Rundsch Med Prax. 1991 Apr 30;80(18):483-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-1991
Author
R. Masironi
Author Affiliation
Organisation mondiale de la santé, Département tabac ou santé, Genève.
Source
Schweiz Rundsch Med Prax. 1991 Apr 30;80(18):483-5
Date
Apr-30-1991
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
English Abstract
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Physicians
Prevalence
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
Data on the prevalence of smoking among doctors in Europe could be retrieved from 22 countries. Only in the UK, Finland, Norway, Sweden and the Netherlands surveys have been carried out systematically over many years. Marked decreases in the percentage of smokers among doctors have been noted, particularly in the UK and the Scandinavian countries. Only about 13 to 15% of physicians at present smoke in these countries, down from 60 to 70% in the 1950s. The highest percentages of smokers among doctors--about 40%--are found in Italy, Greece and Spain.
PubMed ID
2047625 View in PubMed
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[AIDS in Norway and Europe in the early 1990's]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8383
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1990 Apr;100(6):272
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
V. Hasseltvedt
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1990 Apr;100(6):272
Date
Apr-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
PubMed ID
2399125 View in PubMed
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Substantial decline of notified hepatitis B in major parts of Europe after 1985.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56822
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1994;26(1):19-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
S. Iwarson
W. Jilg
T. Stroffolini
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Göteborg, Ostra Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1994;26(1):19-22
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Abstract
A decline in the incidence of notified hepatitis B cases has been observed in major parts of Europe since the mid-1980s. Sweden may be taken as an example of a low prevalence area in the north where notifications of acute hepatitis B declined from 6 cases/100,000 inhabitants in 1985 to only 3/100,000 annually in 1988-91. Choosing W. Germany as an example from central Europe, the notification rate of acute hepatitis B declined from 11 cases/100,000 inhabitants in 1984 to 6-8/100,000 in 1988-91. In Italy, a dramatic decline in hepatitis B infections has occurred since 1985, according to the national hepatitis surveillance system (SEIEVA), from 12 cases/100,000 inhabitants in 1985 to 5/100,000 in 1988-91. A similar trend has also been observed in the USA which seems to be unrelated to vaccination, since only limited vaccination programs have been initiated in high-risk groups. Also in Europe, changed sexual and needle-usage practices in risk groups such as drug addicts and male homosexuals have probably contributed to the observed decline. In southern Europe, rapidly improving socio-economic conditions and improved medical precautions against hepatitis B have probably also been important factors.
PubMed ID
8191235 View in PubMed
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Source
Lepr Rev. 1991 Jun;62(2):230
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
J G Andersen
Source
Lepr Rev. 1991 Jun;62(2):230
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amyloidosis
Disease Outbreaks
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Leprosy - epidemiology
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: Lepr Rev. 1990 Dec;61(4):398-92280667
PubMed ID
1741844 View in PubMed
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[Cardiovascular mortality in the Russian Federation and possible mechanisms of its changes].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298993
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2018; 118(8):98-103
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
S A Boytsov
S A Shalnova
A D Deev
Author Affiliation
National Medical Research Centre for Cardiology, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2018; 118(8):98-103
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The article presents data on the mortality trends in Russia during the last decade in comparison with other countries in Europe. It is shown that in spite the decline in death rates, Russia remains among the countries with the highest mortality rates from CVD. The specifics of mortality that distinguish Russia from other countries are described: a large variability between regions in mortality levels, differences between sexes, dependence on geographical location and socio-economic development of the regions, and late referral to a doctor in life-threatening conditions. The article emphasizes the role of risk factors and accessibility and quality of medical care to the population, as the two main components of the mechanism for changing mortality from CVD.
? ?????? ?????????? ?????? ? ???????? ?????????? ?? ????????-?????????? ??????????? (???) ?? ????????? ???? ? ????????? ? ??????? ???????? ??????. ????????, ??? ?? ???? ???????? ?????????? ?????? ???????? ? ???? ????? ? ???????? ???????? ???????????? ?????????? ?? ???. ???????? ??????? ?????? ?? ?????? ?????: ??????? ?????????????? ????? ????????? ? ??????? ??????????, ???????? ????? ??????, ??????????? ?? ??????????????? ????????? ? ?????????-?????????????? ???????? ????????, ??????? ????????? ? ????? ??? ?????????? ????? ??????????. ?????????????? ???? ???????? ????? ? ??????????? ? ???????? ???????? ??????????? ?????? ????????? ??? ???? ???????? ???????????? ????????? ????????? ?????????? ?? ???.
PubMed ID
30251986 View in PubMed
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Current status of cancer registration in Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25665
Source
Recent Results Cancer Res. 1989;114:70-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
H. Tulinius
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Reykjavik.
Source
Recent Results Cancer Res. 1989;114:70-4
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Europe - epidemiology
History
History, 20th Century
Humans
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
PubMed ID
2682860 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Oct 23;123(20):2848
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-23-2003
Author
Olaf Gjerløw Aasland
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Oct 23;123(20):2848
Date
Oct-23-2003
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - trends
Comparative Study
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
PubMed ID
14600707 View in PubMed
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Pneumococcal disease surveillance in Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80013
Source
Euro Surveill. 2006 Sep;11(9):171-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Pebody R G
Hellenbrand W.
D'Ancona F.
Ruutu P.
Author Affiliation
Health Protection Agency, London, United Kingdom.
Source
Euro Surveill. 2006 Sep;11(9):171-8
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Sentinel Surveillance
Abstract
Pneumococcal disease (Pnc) is responsible for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD)--mainly meningitis and septicaemia--and is an infection of public health importance in Europe. Following the licensure of an effective conjugate vaccine (PCV) in Europe, several European countries, including France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain and the United Kingdom, are introducing universal Pnc childhood immunisation programmes. As part of a European Union (EU) funded project on pneumococcal disease (Pnc-EURO), a questionnaire was distributed in late 2003 to each of the current 25 European Union member states as well as Norway and Switzerland to get a clearer picture of national surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in Europe. All respondents were contacted in 2006 and asked to provide an update to the questionnaire. Twenty two of the 27 countries targeted completed and returned the questionnaire. Four of the 22 responding countries have no reporting requirement for IPD. Eighteen countries reported a total of 27 national surveillance systems. Case definitions employed in these systems differed. Fourteen of the 18 countries reported collection of IPD strains to a single reference lab for serotyping and in 12 countries to a single laboratory for susceptibility testing. Thirteen countries undertook laboratory quality assurance. Information on age and sex were widely collected, but only 11/27 systems collected information on pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine status, while 5/27 systems collected information on pneumococcal conjugate vaccine status. The incidence of IPD reported in each of the 18 countries ranged from 0.4 to 20/100,000 in the general population, with a total of 23,470 IPD cases reported over a 12 month period. Surveillance for IPD in Europe is very heterogeneous. Several countries lack surveillance systems. Large differences in reported disease incidence may reflect both true differences, and also variations in patient and healthcare factors, including surveillance. If IPD surveillance in Europe can be strengthened, countries will be able to make informed decisions regarding the introduction of new pneumococcal vaccines and also to monitor and compare the impact and effectiveness of new programmes.
PubMed ID
17075159 View in PubMed
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Association between labour market trends and trends in young people's mental health in ten European countries 1983-2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95101
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:325
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Lager Anton C J
Bremberg Sven G
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Equity Studies, CHESS, Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. anton.lager@chess.su.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:325
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental health
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mental health problems have become more common among young people over the last twenty years, especially in certain countries. The reasons for this have remained unclear. The hypothesis tested in this study is that national trends in young people's mental health are associated with national trends in young people's labour market. METHODS: National secular changes in the proportion of young people with mental health problems and national secular labour market changes were studied from 1983 to 2005 in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Hungary, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. RESULTS: The correlation between the national secular changes in the proportion of young people not in the labour force and the national secular changes in proportion of young people with mental health symptoms was 0.77 for boys and 0.92 for girls. CONCLUSION: Labour market trends may have contributed to the deteriorating trend in mental health among young people. A true relationship, should other studies confirm it, would be an important aspect to take into account when forming labour market policies or policies concerning the delivery of higher education.
PubMed ID
19737380 View in PubMed
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1015 records – page 1 of 102.