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135 records – page 1 of 14.

[4 years after Chernobyl: medical repercussions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25355
Source
Bull Cancer. 1990;77(5):419-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
D. Hubert
Source
Bull Cancer. 1990;77(5):419-28
Date
1990
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Abortion, Habitual - epidemiology
Blood Cell Count
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Decontamination - methods
Diarrhea - etiology
English Abstract
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Psychophysiologic Disorders - etiology
Pulmonary Fibrosis - etiology
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Skin - radiation effects
Triage
Ukraine
Abstract
The nuclear accident at Chernobyl accounted for an acute radiation syndrome in 237 persons on the site. Triage was the initial problem and was carried out according to clinical and biological criteria; evaluating the doses received was based on these criteria. Thirty one persons died and only 1 survived a dose higher than 6 Gy. Skin radiation burns which were due to inadequate decontamination, greatly worsened prognosis. The results of 13 bone marrow transplantations were disappointing, with only 2 survivors. Some time after the accident, these severely irradiated patients are mainly suffering from psychosomatic disorders, in the USSR, some areas have been significantly contaminated and several measures were taken to mitigate the impact on population: evacuating 135,000 persons, distributing prophylactic iodine, establishing standards and controls on foodstuff. Radiation phobia syndrome which developed in many persons, is the only sanitary effect noticed up to now. Finally, in Europe, there was only an increase in induced abortions and this was totally unwarranted. If we consider the risk of radiation induced cancer, an effect might not be demonstrated.
PubMed ID
2205311 View in PubMed
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[Accidents and accident mortality in Denmark--a comparison with Scandinavia and Europe]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11630
Source
Nord Med. 1994;109(10):265-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
T B Hansen
N D Röck
A. Poulstrup
S. Sabroe
J. Steensberg
B. Netterstrøm
Author Affiliation
Ortopaedkirurgisk afd 0 og Ulykkes Analyse Gruppen, Odense Universitets Hospital.
Source
Nord Med. 1994;109(10):265-8
Date
1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, occupational - mortality
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholic Intoxication - mortality
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Poisoning - mortality
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
As the development in mean age of the population and life expectancy has been less favourable in Denmark than in the rest of Western Europe, the Ministry of Health decided to investigate statistics for the period, 1972-1990, for the main areas where Danish life expectancy was poorer. A sharp increase in the incidence of accidental poisoning with medical drugs and alcohol during the period was found to be a factor contributing to the poorer Danish statistics during the period. In the subcategory, death after a fall, there was an increase in incidence among the elderly, but the loss of life-years remained constant. The subcategory, fatal road accidents, manifested a marked reduction in incidence, despite the increase in traffic density during the period, and there was a reduction in the loss of life-years. Thus, in the category, accidental deaths, the increase in the incidence of accidental poisonings would appear to be the only factor contributing to the poorer development in mean age and life expectancy in Denmark.
PubMed ID
7937021 View in PubMed
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[A comparative study of the evolution of atherosclerosis in men over a 25-year period in 11 European and Asiatic cities]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54287
Source
Arkh Patol. 1998 Nov-Dec;60(6):3-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
A M Vikhert
V S Zhdanov
N H Sternby
J. Dusková
I E Galakhov
Author Affiliation
A. L. Myasnikov Institute of Clinical Cardiology, Russian Cardiologic Scientific Centre, Moscow.
Source
Arkh Patol. 1998 Nov-Dec;60(6):3-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aorta - pathology
Arteriosclerosis - ethnology - pathology
Asia, Central - epidemiology
Autopsy - statistics & numerical data
Comparative Study
Continental Population Groups
Coronary Vessels - pathology
Disease Progression
English Abstract
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Siberia - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Repeated epidemiologic study of atherosclerosis in males on the basis of autopsy material with 25-year interval (1963-66 and 1985-89) has been performed in 7 European cities (Malmö, Praha, Riga, Tallinn, Tartu, Kharkov, Yalta) and 4 Asia cities (Ashkhabad, Bishkek, Irkutsk, Yakutsk). Accelerated development of atherosclerosis in the 2nd study has been revealed in males in the majority of cities except Malmö and Praha. No significant differences in atherosclerosis of aorta and coronary arteries were found in these two cities. An increase of the calcinosis surface in the coronary arteries combined with a higher incidence of coronary stenosis was typical for the 2nd study. Atherosclerosis was less pronounced in the indigenous population of Ashkhabad, Bishkek and Yakutsk in both studied than in non-indigenous populations. There was a positive correlation in males between lethality of coronary heart disease and other cardiovascular diseases and the degree of coronary atherosclerosis. Thus, the course of atherosclerosis can change within the life of one generation.
PubMed ID
9949896 View in PubMed
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[Adult body height in women in Cordoba, Argentina, and exploration of the current trend (1978-198)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33466
Source
Rev Panam Salud Publica. 1999 Jan;5(1):17-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
F. Agrelo
L R Pascual
B. Lobo
J. Sabulsky
Author Affiliation
Ministerio de Salud de la Provincia de Córdoba, Departamento de Maternidad e Infancia, Argentina.
Source
Rev Panam Salud Publica. 1999 Jan;5(1):17-22
Date
Jan-1999
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Argentina
Body Height
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Europe
Female
Growth
Humans
Japan
Nutritional Status
Reference Standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Abstract
The objective of this work was to contribute local data concerning the full adult height of women in Cordoba, Argentina, and to explore the possibility of a secular trend in their heights. For the study, 513 women were examined during May and June 1994. All of the women were between 18 and 40 years of age and were mothers of children who were included in a study on lactation, feeding, growth, and development in Córdoba. The measurements were carried out applying standardized techniques and using as a reference standard the 50th-percentile level data from the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. The mean full height of the Córdoba population studied was 157.9 cm, 0.97 standard deviation (SD) below the reference norm. For the women from the highest of six socioeconomic strata, the mean height was 159.7 cm (-0.67 SD); the mean for women from the lowest stratum was 156.2 cm (-1.25 SD). The difference in the means of those two socioeconomic groups was statistically significant (P
PubMed ID
10050610 View in PubMed
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[Adults with congenital heart defects--a growing patient group]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53889
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Feb 14;98(7):656-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-2001
Author
U. Thilén
Author Affiliation
Hjärt-lungdivisionen, Universitetssjukhuset i Lund. Ulf.Thilen@kard.lu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Feb 14;98(7):656-60
Date
Feb-14-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
English Abstract
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Heart Defects, Congenital - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - diagnosis
Prognosis
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The number of grown ups with congenital heart disease (GUCH) increases due to the success story of pediatric cardiology and heart surgery. However, late complications such as arrhythmia, endocarditis and heart failure are common, as are patients requiring reoperation/catheter intervention. In some categories of congenital heart disease, pregnancy may pose a substantial threat. Early information about this is essential. The care of these patients, including heart surgery, should be centralized. A registry of GUCH-patients has been created in Sweden, promoting experience and knowledge concerning a "new" and expanding group of patients in cardiology.
PubMed ID
11475253 View in PubMed
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[Aerobic capacity in children and adolescents--Nordic results over the past 45 years]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33698
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Aug 30;118(20):3106-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-1998
Author
P M Fredriksen
E. Thaulow
W. Nystad
F. Ingjer
Author Affiliation
Barnehjerteseksionen Rikshospitalet, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Aug 30;118(20):3106-10
Date
Aug-30-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Europe
Exercise - physiology
Female
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Oxygen consumption
Scandinavia
Abstract
The aim of this study was to reveal whether today's children and adolescents have lower aerobic capacity compared with earlier studies. Aerobic capacity may be defined as the highest amount of oxygen a subject is able to consume per unit of time. Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) is often used as a measure of aerobic capacity in children. VO2peak in 196 healthy children and adolescents of both sexes, aged 8-16 years, was measured on a graded treadmill test. The mean results of VO2peak (l.min-1) showed only small differences compared with previous studies in Scandinavia. There was, however, greater dispersion in the present study when the VO2peak-values were corrected for weight (ml.kg-1.min-1) than in the earlier studies. When compared to other countries in Europe, Norwegian subjects achieved higher values. The reason may be due to either genetic differences or to a higher level of physical activity among the Norwegian subjects.
PubMed ID
9760851 View in PubMed
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[[Aging of the population and social policy: lessons from Sweden].]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73181
Source
Jinkogaku Kenkyu. 1994 May;(17):5-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
N. Maruo
Source
Jinkogaku Kenkyu. 1994 May;(17):5-14
Date
May-1994
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Birth rate
Demography
Developed Countries
Economics
Employment
English Abstract
Europe
Fertility
Financial Management
Financing, Government
Health Manpower
Income
Marriage
Population
Population Characteristics
Population Dynamics
Scandinavia
Social Security
Sweden
Abstract
"In this paper I tried to show how the ageing of the population influences the change in the growth of employment, employment structure, the savings ratio, economic growth and the cost of social security [in Sweden]. In the latter part of the paper I suggested a close correlation between the average marriage age of women, the total fertility rate and the work participation ratio of women." (SUMMARY IN ENG)
PubMed ID
12319307 View in PubMed
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[AIDS and drug addicts in the view of an epidemiologist]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8724
Source
AIDS Forsch. 1987 Jun;(6):323-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1987
Author
B. Velimirovic
Source
AIDS Forsch. 1987 Jun;(6):323-34
Date
Jun-1987
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Asia
Asia, Western
Austria
Behavior
Belgium
Denmark
Developed Countries
Disease
English Abstract
Europe
Germany, West
Great Britain
Greece
HIV Infections
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Malta
Netherlands
Norway
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Portugal
Scandinavia
Sexual Behavior
Social Problems
Spain
Substance-Related Disorders
Sweden
Switzerland
Therapeutics
Virus Diseases
Abstract
Data from 12 different European countries show a rapid increase in HIV antibody positivity among drug users or a high degree of contamination already reached wherever studies have been made. Until 31 December 1986, 698 (18%) of AIDS cases were among drug users, of which 600 (15%) of AIDS cases were solely drug users, and 98 (3%) were in addition homosexual or bisexual. A further increase is expected. Because of the epidemiological importance for transmission to the heterosexual population, this problem has become a focus of attention. Drug abusing prostitutes constitute a major source of infection for the heterosexual population and newborns. The increase in the number of AIDS cases in 1986 among male drug abusers was 98 - that is up 61% compared to previous years; among women, the increase was 56%. The 3 main approaches to solution of this problem, i.e. interdiction of the drug trade, availability of sterile needles, and an education program have not proven as successful as anticipated. Relevant indications of the progress of infection in society can only be obtained by systematic observation of conversion rates in differential subgroups, i.e. drug abusers, newly incarcerated drug abusers, male and female prostitutes who use drugs, and individuals newly reporting for treatment. Separation of HIV antibody positives and negatives in therapeutic communities which are not drug free is recommended for epidemiological purposes in view of the developments to date. Nor should forced segregation of the infected from noninfected be dismissed out of hand.
PubMed ID
12281241 View in PubMed
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[AIDS. A threat and a challenge of our time]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8757
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1986 Aug 30;106(24):1963-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-1986
Author
P G Djupesland
O. Nilsen
A. Lystad
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1986 Aug 30;106(24):1963-6
Date
Aug-30-1986
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - transmission
Africa
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
United States
West Indies
Abstract
The development of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic in Europe is following the same course as it did in the US but is delayed by about 3 years. If this time is used properly, it may be possible to stop the epidemic at an early stage. The special epidemiology of the disease, the long incubation period, prejudice, and taboo concerning sexuality have constrained constructive and open debate on strategies and approaches. By mid-1986, 21,302 AIDS cases had been registered in the US for a prevalence rate of 88/million and 11.654 deaths had resulted. In Europe, 2,542 AIDS cases had been registered by mid-1986 for a prevalence rate varying between 0 and 17.4/million in various countries. Of the total number, 67% were homosexual or bisexual men, 10% misusers of needles, 4% hemophiliacs, and 2% transfusion related. In Norway in mid-1986, 25 persons had contracted AIDS for a prevalence rate of 6.0/million; 20 of these are dead. Over 70% of those contracting AIDS die within 2 years, for a cumulative lethality in the US and Europe as a whole slightly 50%. 20 of the Norwegian AIDS patients belonged to the homo/bisexual male risk group; 1 was a hemophiliac; 1 a blood recipient; 1 an injection misuser; and 1 was heterosexually infected. Average survival from time of diagnosis was about 6 months. Over 300 persons in Norway have been found human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody positive and the actual number of infected is calculated at 2,500. By the mid-1990s AIDS may become the most common cause of death in Norway.
PubMed ID
3775717 View in PubMed
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[AIDS in Russia. It is still possible to stop the epidemic. Interview with Dr. A.P. Koslov]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7803
Source
SidAlerte. 1996 Jun-Jul;(54-55):9-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
P. Bertrand
Source
SidAlerte. 1996 Jun-Jul;(54-55):9-10
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Developed Countries
Disease
Economics
English Abstract
Europe
Europe, Eastern
HIV Infections
International Cooperation
Research
Russia
Technology
Vaccines
Virus Diseases
Abstract
According to A.P. Koslov, president of the Fourth International Conference on AIDS, Cancer, and Associated Diseases held in Russia in 1996, the conference represents the first high level discussion of AIDS risk management in Russia. Russia has a strong potential for development of a vaccine, having been a key player in the smallpox eradication program in the late 1950s. Conditions are difficult at present, but it is possible that Russia will be able to develop a practical vaccine for distribution in the Third World. Efforts to develop an HIV vaccine underway in different countries have been examined, and a list has been compiled of Russian institutions able to participate in HIV vaccine development. International assistance for vaccine development in Russia would help both the medical establishment in Russia, which has suffered because of the economic and social crisis, and the international community. A meeting is planned for December 1996 in St. Petersburg to organize an AIDS control organization for all of Russia. Mobilization of support for AIDS prevention activities is necessary but very difficult. If nothing is done, the epidemic in Ukraine will soon spread to Russia. But Russia and China are among the few countries where an HIV epidemic could still be prevented or stopped. The association in St. Petersburg cooperates with other former Soviet republics in AIDS control activities, although attendance at international meetings and conferences is frequently curtailed for financial reasons.
PubMed ID
12179251 View in PubMed
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135 records – page 1 of 14.