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AACVPR/ACC/AHA 2007 performance measures on cardiac rehabilitation for referral to and delivery of cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention services endorsed by the American College of Chest Physicians, American College of Sports Medicine, American Physical Therapy Association, Canadian Association of Cardiac Rehabilitation, European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, Inter-American Heart Foundation, National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161050
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2007 Oct 2;50(14):1400-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2-2007

The ABCA4 2588G>C Stargardt mutation: single origin and increasing frequency from South-West to North-East Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50771
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2002 Mar;10(3):197-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Alessandra Maugeri
Kris Flothmann
Nadine Hemmrich
Sofie Ingvast
Paula Jorge
Eva Paloma
Reshma Patel
Jean-Michel Rozet
Jaana Tammur
Francesco Testa
Susana Balcells
Alan C Bird
Han G Brunner
Carel B Hoyng
Andres Metspalu
Francesca Simonelli
Rando Allikmets
Shomi S Bhattacharya
Michele D'Urso
Roser Gonzàlez-Duarte
Josseline Kaplan
Gerard J te Meerman
Rosário Santos
Marianne Schwartz
Guy Van Camp
Claes Wadelius
Bernhard H F Weber
Frans P M Cremers
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Genetics, University Medical Center Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. a.maugeri@antrg.azn.nl
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2002 Mar;10(3):197-203
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters - genetics
Alleles
Base Sequence
Europe
Gene Frequency
Heterozygote
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Mutation
Point Mutation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
United States
Abstract
Inherited retinal dystrophies represent the most important cause of vision impairment in adolescence, affecting approximately 1 out of 3000 individuals. Mutations of the photoreceptor-specific gene ABCA4 (ABCR) are a common cause of retinal dystrophy. A number of mutations have been repeatedly reported for this gene, notably the 2588G>C mutation which is frequent in both patients and controls. Here we ascertained the frequency of the 2588G>C mutation in a total of 2343 unrelated random control individuals from 11 European countries and 241 control individuals from the US, as well as in 614 patients with STGD both from Europe and the US. We found an overall carrier frequency of 1 out of 54 in Europe, compared with 1 out of 121 in the US, confirming that the 2588G>C ABCA4 mutation is one of the most frequent autosomal recessive mutations in the European population. Carrier frequencies show an increasing gradient in Europe from South-West to North-East. The lowest carrier frequency, 0 out of 199 (0%), was found in Portugal; the highest, 11 out of 197 (5.5%), was found in Sweden. Haplotype analysis in 16 families segregating the 2588G>C mutation showed four intragenic polymorphisms invariably present in all 16 disease chromosomes and sharing of the same allele for several markers flanking the ABCA4 locus in most of the disease chromosomes. These results indicate a single origin of the 2588G>C mutation which, to our best estimate, occurred between 2400 and 3000 years ago.
PubMed ID
11973624 View in PubMed
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Abortion, 1973: some recent world events in relation to pregnancy termination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66364
Source
Trans Aust Med Congr. 1974 Jun 1;1(5):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1974
Source
Trans Aust Med Congr. 1974 Jun 1;1(5):27-30
Date
Jun-1-1974
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Americas
Developed Countries
Europe
Europe, Eastern
Family Planning Services
France
Germany, East
Germany, West
Great Britain
Italy
Netherlands
North America
Norway
Scandinavia
Sweden
United States
Abstract
This selective report notes recent events relating to pregnancy termination in the U.S., France, England, Italy, East and West Germany, Norway, Sweden, and the Netherlands. Due to the Supreme Court decision in January 1973, abortion is now legal in the U.S. Although abortions is illegal in France, an estimated 400,000-1,000,000 clandestine abortions occur each year. Although abortions are legal in Britain, the ease with which they can be obtained varies regionally. As of March 1973, contraceptives are part of Britain's National Health Service. In Italy, a bill to legalize abortion has been introduced in Parliament, though there is little likelihood of its passing. In East Germany, abortion can be granted for medical or social reasons, while in West Germany, the governmental policies are more conservative, resulting in an abundance of illegal abortions performed by physicians. There is a trend toward easier abortion laws in Norway and Sweden. Little is happening in the Netherlands as far as liberalizing the abortion laws. Rather liberal grounds for pregnancy termination exist in China (though emphasis is on contraception), India, Russia, and Eastern Europe (with the exception of Romania). Abortion is frowned upon in Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East resulting in a large number of illegal abortions. It is concluded that there is liberalized abortion in communist bloc countries, there is trend toward liberalizing abortion in a large group of western countries, and tradition and religion are responsible for conservative abortion laws in a third group of countries.
PubMed ID
12333737 View in PubMed
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Abortion law reform and repeal: legislative and judicial developments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature255946
Source
Clin Obstet Gynecol. 1971 Dec;14(4):1165-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1971

Absence of indigenous specific West Nile virus antibodies in Tyrolean blood donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134646
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Jan;31(1):77-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
S T Sonnleitner
J. Simeoni
E. Schmutzhard
M. Niedrig
F. Ploner
H. Schennach
M P Dierich
G. Walder
Author Affiliation
Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, Medical University Innsbruck, Fritz Pregl Straße 1-3/III, Innsbruck, Austria. sissyson@gmx.at
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Jan;31(1):77-81
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Blood Donors
Child, Preschool
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - immunology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Europe
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Neutralization Tests
West Nile Fever - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
West Nile virus - immunology
Abstract
In the last several years, West Nile virus (WNV) was proven to be present especially in the neighboring countries of Austria, such as Italy, Hungary, and the Czech Republic, as well as in eastern parts of Austria, where it was detected in migratory and domestic birds. In summer 2010, infections with WNV were reported from Romania and northern Greece with about 150 diseased and increasingly fatal cases. We tested the sera of 1,607 blood donors from North Tyrol (Austria) and South Tyrol (Italy) for antibodies against WNV by using IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Initial results of the ELISA tests showed seroprevalence rates of 46.2% in North Tyrol and 0.5% in South Tyrol, which turned out to be false-positive cross-reactions with antibodies against tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) by adjacent neutralization assays. These results indicate that seropositivity against WNV requires confirmation by neutralization assays, as cross-reactivity with TBEV is frequent and because, currently, WNV is not endemic in the study area.
PubMed ID
21556676 View in PubMed
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Abstracts. Seventh annual meeting. The European Society for Paediatric Haematology and Immunology. Oslo, Norway, June 11-13, 1979.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41315
Source
Pediatr Res. 1979 Aug;13(8):948-57
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Aug-1979

[A comparative analysis of organization of care for patients with stroke in Russia, Europe and the United States].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177271
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2004;(Suppl 11):64-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
A V Stakhovskaia
V V Gudkova
M V Kolesnikov
M A Evzel'man
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2004;(Suppl 11):64-8
Date
2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Brain Ischemia - therapy
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration
Europe
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration
Humans
Russia
United States
Abstract
Studies of the systems of medical care for patients with acute disorders of brain circulation indicate that well-organized "stroke" service promotes morbidity decrease, lowers neurological deficit expression and restriction of social and daily activities. At the same time, there are essential differences in the scope of the medical care, which a patient can receive in different countries and no consensus on the most optimal system of medical scope for patients with stroke at different stages. The recent statistical reviews confirm that a patient admitted to specialized stroke departments has a less chance to die or to be a handicap. The article analyzes current systems service for patients with acute disorders of brain blood circulation in the United States, Europe and Russia.
PubMed ID
15559225 View in PubMed
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Across six nations: stressful events in the lives of children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35027
Source
Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 1996;26(3):139-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
K. Yamamoto
O L Davis
S. Dylak
J. Whittaker
C. Marsh
P C van der Westhuizen
Author Affiliation
University of Colorado at Denver 80217, USA.
Source
Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 1996;26(3):139-50
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Australia
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child Psychology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Europe
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Reference Values
Stress, Psychological
United States
Abstract
A total of 1,729 children (2nd-9th grades) in South Africa, Iceland, Poland, Australia, the U.K., and the U.S.A. rated 20 events in terms of how upsetting they are. Save in Poland, the ratings were in close agreement (r, .85-.97), placing the loss of parent at the top and a new baby sibling at the bottom. In Poland, the baby's arrival led the list. Even so, what was seen as quite upsetting fell everywhere in the same two categories--experiences that threaten one's sense of security and those that occasion personal denigration and embarrassment.
PubMed ID
8819876 View in PubMed
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833 records – page 1 of 84.