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Absence of indigenous specific West Nile virus antibodies in Tyrolean blood donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134646
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Jan;31(1):77-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
S T Sonnleitner
J. Simeoni
E. Schmutzhard
M. Niedrig
F. Ploner
H. Schennach
M P Dierich
G. Walder
Author Affiliation
Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, Medical University Innsbruck, Fritz Pregl Straße 1-3/III, Innsbruck, Austria. sissyson@gmx.at
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Jan;31(1):77-81
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Blood Donors
Child, Preschool
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - immunology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Europe
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Neutralization Tests
West Nile Fever - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
West Nile virus - immunology
Abstract
In the last several years, West Nile virus (WNV) was proven to be present especially in the neighboring countries of Austria, such as Italy, Hungary, and the Czech Republic, as well as in eastern parts of Austria, where it was detected in migratory and domestic birds. In summer 2010, infections with WNV were reported from Romania and northern Greece with about 150 diseased and increasingly fatal cases. We tested the sera of 1,607 blood donors from North Tyrol (Austria) and South Tyrol (Italy) for antibodies against WNV by using IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Initial results of the ELISA tests showed seroprevalence rates of 46.2% in North Tyrol and 0.5% in South Tyrol, which turned out to be false-positive cross-reactions with antibodies against tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) by adjacent neutralization assays. These results indicate that seropositivity against WNV requires confirmation by neutralization assays, as cross-reactivity with TBEV is frequent and because, currently, WNV is not endemic in the study area.
PubMed ID
21556676 View in PubMed
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Abstracts. Seventh annual meeting. The European Society for Paediatric Haematology and Immunology. Oslo, Norway, June 11-13, 1979.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41315
Source
Pediatr Res. 1979 Aug;13(8):948-57
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Aug-1979

The acceptability of isoflavones as a treatment of menopausal symptoms: a European survey among postmenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70456
Source
Climacteric. 2005 Sep;8(3):230-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
C. Koebnick
M. Reimann
A. Carlsohn
S. Korzen-Bohr
S. Bügel
J. Hallund
L. Rossi
F. Branca
W. Hall
C. Williams
H-J F Zunft
K. O'Doherty Jensen
Author Affiliation
German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Department of Intervention Studies, Nuthethal, Germany.
Source
Climacteric. 2005 Sep;8(3):230-42
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Supplements
Europe
Female
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Isoflavones - therapeutic use
Life Style
Menopause
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Phytotherapy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vitamins - therapeutic use
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate determinants of the acceptability of isoflavone products among postmenopausal women with regard to social and lifestyle factors, dietary habits, health concerns, food beliefs, menopausal symptoms and therapies, and to elucidate preferences for specific products. METHODS: A consumer survey was conducted among postmenopausal women in four European countries (Germany, Denmark, Italy and the UK), including a total of 465 respondents. RESULTS: The declared acceptability of isoflavones was highest in Germany (80%), followed by Italy (75%), the UK (59%) and Denmark (55%; p
PubMed ID
16390755 View in PubMed
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The aetiology of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3952
Source
Clin Otolaryngol Allied Sci. 2001 Apr;26(2):82-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
A L McDermott
S N Dutt
J C Watkinson
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham University, Birmingham, UK.
Source
Clin Otolaryngol Allied Sci. 2001 Apr;26(2):82-92
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Africa - epidemiology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asia - epidemiology
Carcinoma - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a disease with a remarkable racial and geographical distribution. In most parts of the world it is a rare condition and in only a handful of places does this low risk profile alter. These include the Southern Chinese, Eskimos and other Arctic natives, inhabitants of South-East Asia and also the populations of North Africa and Kuwait.
PubMed ID
11309046 View in PubMed
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Age at onset of multiple sclerosis may be influenced by place of residence during childhood rather than ancestry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170585
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2006;26(3):162-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
J. Kennedy
P. O'Connor
A D Sadovnick
M. Perara
I. Yee
B. Banwell
Author Affiliation
The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. L5M 4A7, Canada.
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2006;26(3):162-7
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Asia - ethnology
Caribbean Region - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Emigration and Immigration
Europe - ethnology
Humans
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Abstract
Multiple sclerosis (MS) most commonly affects individuals of Northern European descent who live in countries at high latitude. The relative contributions of ancestry, country of birth and residence as determinants of MS risk have been studied in adult MS, but have not been explored in the pediatric MS population. In this study, we compare the demographics of pediatric- and adult-onset MS patients cared for in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, a multicultural region. The country of birth, residence during childhood, and ancestry were compared for 44 children and 573 adults. Our results demonstrate that although both the pediatric and adult cohorts were essentially born and raised in the same region of Ontario, Canada, children with MS were more likely to report Caribbean, Asian or Middle Eastern ancestry, and were less likely to have European heritage compared with individuals with adult-onset MS. The difference in ancestry between the pediatric and adult MS cohorts can be explained by two hypotheses: (1) individuals raised in a region of high MS prevalence, but whose ancestors originate from regions in which MS is rare, have an earlier age of MS onset, and (2) the place of residence during childhood, irrespective of ancestry, determines lifetime MS risk -- a fact that will be reflected in a change in the demographics of the adult MS cohort in our region as Canadian-raised children of recent immigrants reach the typical age of adult-onset MS.
PubMed ID
16493204 View in PubMed
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Age-standardisation of relative survival ratios of cancer patients in a comparison between countries, genders and time periods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153684
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2009 Mar;45(4):642-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Arun Pokhrel
Timo Hakulinen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Pieni Roobertinkatu 9, FI-00130 Helsinki, Finland. arun.pokhrel@cancer.fi
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2009 Mar;45(4):642-7
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Epidemiologic Methods
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Prognosis
Sex Distribution
United States - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
A recent method of age-standardisation of relative survival ratios for cancer patients does not require calculation of age-specific relative survival ratios, as ratios of age-specific proportions between the standard population and study group at the beginning of the follow-up are used to substitute the original individual observations. This method, however, leads to direct age-standardisation with weights that are different for each patient group if the general population mortality patterns for the groups are different. This is the case in international comparisons, and in comparisons between genders and time periods. The magnitude of the bias caused by the differences in general population mortality is investigated for comparisons involving European countries and the USA. Patients in each country are assumed to have exactly the same age-specific relative survival ratios as those diagnosed in Finland in 1985-2004. An application of a properly functioning age-standardisation method should then give exactly equal age-standardised relative survival ratios for each country. However, the recent method shows substantial differences between countries, with highest relative survival for populations, where the general population mortality in the oldest ages is the highest. This source of error can thus be a serious limitation for the use of the method, and other methods that are available should then be employed.
PubMed ID
19081246 View in PubMed
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AIDS--dramatic surge in ex-Soviet Union, no respite worldwide, new data show.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195656
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 2001;79(1):78
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
R. Dobson
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 2001;79(1):78
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Europe, Eastern - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Russia - epidemiology
Notes
Comment In: Bull World Health Organ. 2001;79(3):26911285679
PubMed ID
11217673 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and attitudes towards banning alcohol sales on campus among European university students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90196
Source
Public Health. 2009 Feb;123(2):122-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Stock C.
Mikolajczyk R.
Bloomfield K.
Maxwell A E
Ozcebe H.
Petkeviciene J.
Naydenova V.
Marin-Fernandez B.
El-Ansari W.
Krämer A.
Author Affiliation
University of Southern Denmark, Denmark. cstock@health.sdu.dk
Source
Public Health. 2009 Feb;123(2):122-9
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Attitude
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Students - psychology
Universities - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The European Commission's new health strategy for improving health at the European Union (EU) level includes tackling alcohol consumption. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of alcohol consumption and problem drinking, as well as students' attitudes towards banning the sale of alcohol on campus. STUDY DESIGN: In total, 5826 students from universities in seven European countries (Denmark, Germany, Spain, Lithuania, Poland, Bulgaria and Turkey) took part in this cross-sectional study. METHODS: A self-administered questionnaire assessed sociodemographic information, frequency of alcohol consumption, problem drinking and attitudes towards banning the sale of alcohol on campus. RESULTS: The highest prevalence of drinking alcohol more than once per week was reported in Bulgarian (males 46%, females 64%) and Spanish students (males 59%, females 64%). Among those students who drank alcohol (n=3170), problem drinking (CAGE score >1) was found in 24% of males and 13% of females. Male gender, depressive moods and a low importance of good grades at university were risk factors for drinking alcohol more than once per week as well as for problem drinking. There were substantial country differences in the proportion of students who would support a ban of alcohol sales on campus (23% in Denmark, 88% in Poland). Support for a ban was higher among female students and among students who drank alcohol once or less per week. CONCLUSIONS: Problem drinking is a concern among students in many European countries, especially among males. Students' support for banning the sale of alcohol on campus varies between countries and should be considered in developing EU policy.
PubMed ID
19185890 View in PubMed
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Alcohol culture, family structure and adolescent alcohol use: multilevel modeling of frequency of heavy drinking among 15-16 year old students in 11 European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9740
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2003 Mar;64(2):200-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Thoroddur Bjarnason
Barbro Andersson
Marie Choquet
Zsuzsanna Elekes
Mark Morgan
Gertrude Rapinett
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, New York 12222, USA. thor@albany.edu
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2003 Mar;64(2):200-8
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcoholism - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Culture
Europe - epidemiology
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Frequency of heavy alcohol use among adolescents is examined by family structure and propensity toward heavy alcohol use on the individual level, and by alcohol availability and drinking patterns among adolescents on the societal level. The analysis includes direct effects and moderating effects of societal-level indicators on individual-level associations between family structure and frequency of heavy alcohol use. METHOD: The study drew upon self-reports from 34,001 students in Cyprus, France, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Lithuania, Malta, the Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Sweden and the United Kingdom participating in the 1999 European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs study. Distinctions were drawn between adolescents living with both parents, a single mother, a single father, a mother and stepfather, a father and stepmother, and neither biological parent. The multilevel analysis estimated the effects of societal-level factors on the intercepts and slopes of individual-level regression models. RESULTS: Adolescents living with both biological parents engaged less frequently in heavy alcohol use than those living in any other arrangements. Living with a single mother was associated with less heavy drinking than living with a single father or with neither biological parent. National beer sales figures and societal patterns of heavy adolescent alcohol use predicted more frequent heavy drinking and greater effects of living in nonintact families. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescent heavy drinking is more common in all types of nonintact families. The adverse effect of living in nonintact families is greater in societies where alcohol availability is greater and where adolescents drink more heavily.
PubMed ID
12713193 View in PubMed
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Allergen immunotherapy practice patterns: a worldwide survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124082
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2012 Jun;108(6):454-459.e7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Punita Ponda
Sima Mithani
Yelena Kopyltsova
Cristina Sison
Payel Gupta
Désirée Larenas
Vincent R Bonagura
Author Affiliation
North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, 865 Northern Boulevard, Great Neck, NY 11021, USA. pponda@nshs.edu
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2012 Jun;108(6):454-459.e7
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Asthma - immunology - therapy
Canada
Data Collection
Desensitization, Immunologic - methods
Drug Administration Schedule
Europe
Female
Humans
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards
Pollen - immunology
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - immunology - therapy
United States
Abstract
Allergists around the world have different practice styles when administering subcutaneous aeroallergen immunotherapy (IT) in peak pollen seasons, especially when changing doses or frequency of IT. The Immunotherapy practice parameters do not specifically address this issue.
Given the paucity of good data about adjustment of allergen immunotherapy during the pollen seasons, we examined whether a significant difference is present in the way allergists administer immunotherapy during allergy seasons.
To quantify the practice styles of allergists who are members of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI), a self-reported electronic survey was disseminated in September 2010 with the help of the AAAAI Needs Assessment Committee. The responses were tallied and analyzed according to demographic information.
A total of 1,201 allergists in the AAAAI responded to the survey. Most responders practice in an urban or suburban nonacademic practice in the United States and have been in practice for more than 10 years. The size of their practice was variable. Those in practice for more than 10 years were more likely to adjust the dose and frequency of immunotherapy in pollen seasons.
This survey highlights the differences in the practice styles of AAAAI member allergists, and these differences may be associated with their demographic characteristics. Given the wide variability in how allergists adjust dose and frequency of immunotherapy during pollen seasons, establishing guidelines regarding this routine dilemma might help standardize the delivery of treatment to patients.
PubMed ID
22626600 View in PubMed
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469 records – page 1 of 47.