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493 records – page 1 of 50.

Source
IPPF Med Bull. 1969;3(2):4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1969
Source
IPPF Med Bull. 1969;3(2):4
Date
1969
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Abortion, Therapeutic
Developed Countries
Europe
Family Planning Services
Great Britain
Incidence
Research
Research Design
Abstract
Last month saw the end of the first year of operation of the Abortion Act in Britian, and statistics are now available for the first 10 months, from April 1968, to February 1969. In that time, legal, notified abortions totalled 28,849, of which 20,746 were on the grounds of risk of injury to the physical or mental health of the women. A further 1350 were carried out because of risk to the life of the woman, 1137 because of risk to the physical or mental health of existing children, 965 because of the risk of the woman bearing a physically or mentally handicapped child, and 52 as emergencies to save the life of the woman or prevent grace injury to her health. Another 4599 abortions were carried out for more than 1 of these reasons. An earlier set of statistics, covering the period up to December 1968, showed that 22,256 abortions legally carried out up to then, 13,609 were in National Health Service hospitals and 8601 in other approved hospitals. It is likely that the total number of legal abortions in Britain for the first full year of the Act will be about 34,000. In the years leading up to the introduction of the Abortion Act, the number of abortions carried out in Britain for reasons then legal had been growing steadily, and had reached 7600 in National Health Service hospitals in 1967. An unknown further number of legal abortions had been done in private nursing homes - these cannot be computed because they were not notifiable before the Abortion Act came into force. There are 4 legal abortions for every 100 live births in Britain; this is about 1/2 the figure for Denmark and one tenth that of Czechoslovakia.
PubMed ID
12255617 View in PubMed
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Absence of indigenous specific West Nile virus antibodies in Tyrolean blood donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134646
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Jan;31(1):77-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
S T Sonnleitner
J. Simeoni
E. Schmutzhard
M. Niedrig
F. Ploner
H. Schennach
M P Dierich
G. Walder
Author Affiliation
Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, Medical University Innsbruck, Fritz Pregl Straße 1-3/III, Innsbruck, Austria. sissyson@gmx.at
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Jan;31(1):77-81
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Blood Donors
Child, Preschool
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - immunology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Europe
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Neutralization Tests
West Nile Fever - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
West Nile virus - immunology
Abstract
In the last several years, West Nile virus (WNV) was proven to be present especially in the neighboring countries of Austria, such as Italy, Hungary, and the Czech Republic, as well as in eastern parts of Austria, where it was detected in migratory and domestic birds. In summer 2010, infections with WNV were reported from Romania and northern Greece with about 150 diseased and increasingly fatal cases. We tested the sera of 1,607 blood donors from North Tyrol (Austria) and South Tyrol (Italy) for antibodies against WNV by using IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Initial results of the ELISA tests showed seroprevalence rates of 46.2% in North Tyrol and 0.5% in South Tyrol, which turned out to be false-positive cross-reactions with antibodies against tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) by adjacent neutralization assays. These results indicate that seropositivity against WNV requires confirmation by neutralization assays, as cross-reactivity with TBEV is frequent and because, currently, WNV is not endemic in the study area.
PubMed ID
21556676 View in PubMed
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Abstracts. Seventh annual meeting. The European Society for Paediatric Haematology and Immunology. Oslo, Norway, June 11-13, 1979.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41315
Source
Pediatr Res. 1979 Aug;13(8):948-57
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Aug-1979

Addressing multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in penitentiary hospitals and in the general population of the former Soviet Union.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69465
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 1999 Jul;3(7):582-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
F. Portaels
L. Rigouts
I. Bastian
Author Affiliation
Mycobacteriology Unit, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium. portaels@itg.be
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 1999 Jul;3(7):582-8
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communicable Disease Control - methods
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Hospitals, Special
Humans
Incidence
Male
Prisons - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
USSR - epidemiology
Abstract
High rates of tuberculosis, including multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), have been reported from the former Soviet Union. Our laboratory has supported operational studies in jails in Baku, Azerbaijan, and Mariinsk, Siberia. Combining the results from these two penal systems, the rates of MDR-TB among 'newly enrolled' and 'non-responding' cases were 24.6% and 92.1%, respectively. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) studies strongly suggest transmission of MDR-TB between prisoners. In Mariinsk, the high rates of MDR-TB have been associated with failure rates of 23%-50% among smear-positive cases receiving fully-supervised standard short-course treatment. There are no coherent guidelines for TB control programmes confronted by high pre-existing levels of MDR-TB but who have only limited laboratory, clinical, pharmaceutical and financial resources. A 'DOTS plus' strategy has been advocated in which an established TB control programme is complemented by facilities to treat MDR-TB patients. However, the exact format of these programmes remains unresolved. Further research is required to describe the natural history of MDR-TB infection, to determine the failure rate of (and the additional resistance induced by) standard short-course treatment when MDR-TB is prevalent, to decide whether standardised or individualised second-line regimens can be employed, and to define the laboratory facilities required by a 'DOTS plus' programme.
PubMed ID
10423220 View in PubMed
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The aetiology of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3952
Source
Clin Otolaryngol Allied Sci. 2001 Apr;26(2):82-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
A L McDermott
S N Dutt
J C Watkinson
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham University, Birmingham, UK.
Source
Clin Otolaryngol Allied Sci. 2001 Apr;26(2):82-92
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Africa - epidemiology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asia - epidemiology
Carcinoma - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a disease with a remarkable racial and geographical distribution. In most parts of the world it is a rare condition and in only a handful of places does this low risk profile alter. These include the Southern Chinese, Eskimos and other Arctic natives, inhabitants of South-East Asia and also the populations of North Africa and Kuwait.
PubMed ID
11309046 View in PubMed
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Age at onset of multiple sclerosis may be influenced by place of residence during childhood rather than ancestry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170585
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2006;26(3):162-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
J. Kennedy
P. O'Connor
A D Sadovnick
M. Perara
I. Yee
B. Banwell
Author Affiliation
The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. L5M 4A7, Canada.
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2006;26(3):162-7
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Asia - ethnology
Caribbean Region - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Emigration and Immigration
Europe - ethnology
Humans
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Abstract
Multiple sclerosis (MS) most commonly affects individuals of Northern European descent who live in countries at high latitude. The relative contributions of ancestry, country of birth and residence as determinants of MS risk have been studied in adult MS, but have not been explored in the pediatric MS population. In this study, we compare the demographics of pediatric- and adult-onset MS patients cared for in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, a multicultural region. The country of birth, residence during childhood, and ancestry were compared for 44 children and 573 adults. Our results demonstrate that although both the pediatric and adult cohorts were essentially born and raised in the same region of Ontario, Canada, children with MS were more likely to report Caribbean, Asian or Middle Eastern ancestry, and were less likely to have European heritage compared with individuals with adult-onset MS. The difference in ancestry between the pediatric and adult MS cohorts can be explained by two hypotheses: (1) individuals raised in a region of high MS prevalence, but whose ancestors originate from regions in which MS is rare, have an earlier age of MS onset, and (2) the place of residence during childhood, irrespective of ancestry, determines lifetime MS risk -- a fact that will be reflected in a change in the demographics of the adult MS cohort in our region as Canadian-raised children of recent immigrants reach the typical age of adult-onset MS.
PubMed ID
16493204 View in PubMed
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Age-standardisation of relative survival ratios of cancer patients in a comparison between countries, genders and time periods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153684
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2009 Mar;45(4):642-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Arun Pokhrel
Timo Hakulinen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Pieni Roobertinkatu 9, FI-00130 Helsinki, Finland. arun.pokhrel@cancer.fi
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2009 Mar;45(4):642-7
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Epidemiologic Methods
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Prognosis
Sex Distribution
United States - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
A recent method of age-standardisation of relative survival ratios for cancer patients does not require calculation of age-specific relative survival ratios, as ratios of age-specific proportions between the standard population and study group at the beginning of the follow-up are used to substitute the original individual observations. This method, however, leads to direct age-standardisation with weights that are different for each patient group if the general population mortality patterns for the groups are different. This is the case in international comparisons, and in comparisons between genders and time periods. The magnitude of the bias caused by the differences in general population mortality is investigated for comparisons involving European countries and the USA. Patients in each country are assumed to have exactly the same age-specific relative survival ratios as those diagnosed in Finland in 1985-2004. An application of a properly functioning age-standardisation method should then give exactly equal age-standardised relative survival ratios for each country. However, the recent method shows substantial differences between countries, with highest relative survival for populations, where the general population mortality in the oldest ages is the highest. This source of error can thus be a serious limitation for the use of the method, and other methods that are available should then be employed.
PubMed ID
19081246 View in PubMed
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AIDS--dramatic surge in ex-Soviet Union, no respite worldwide, new data show.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195656
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 2001;79(1):78
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
R. Dobson
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 2001;79(1):78
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Europe, Eastern - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Russia - epidemiology
Notes
Comment In: Bull World Health Organ. 2001;79(3):26911285679
PubMed ID
11217673 View in PubMed
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AIDS incidence rates in Europe and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7962
Source
AIDS. 1994 Aug;8(8):1173-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
S. Franceschi
L. Dal Maso
C. La Vecchia
E. Negri
D. Serraino
Author Affiliation
Servizio di Epidemiologia, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano, Italy.
Source
AIDS. 1994 Aug;8(8):1173-7
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology
Age Factors
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Comparative Study
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Information Systems
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Time Factors
United States - epidemiology
World Health Organization
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To facilitate the quantitative comparison of AIDS incidence statistics between countries and with other diseases using statistics based on age-standardized incidence rates instead of absolute number of cases. DESIGN: AIDS incidence rates for 19 countries belonging to the World Health Organization (WHO) European region, and for comparative purposes, the United States. METHODS: Incidence rates were standardized using the world standard population for all ages, from 1985 to 1992. The data were derived from the WHO European Non-Aggregate AIDS Dataset and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) AIDS Public Information Dataset, adjusted for reporting delays in each country. RESULTS: The AIDS incidence rate for men (81 in 1,000,000) in the United States was fourfold higher than the highest rate in a European country (Switzerland) in 1985; incidence rates in all other European countries, except France and Denmark, were below 10 in 1,000,000. Subsequently, AIDS incidence has increased more rapidly in southern Europe than in the rest of the continent. The estimated incidence rate for men in Spain (243 in 1,000,000) approached that in the United States (304 in 1,000,000) in 1992, and three additional countries (France, Switzerland and Italy) showed rates above 100 per million. The spread of the AIDS epidemic among women in some southern European countries was faster than in the United States. In Switzerland and Spain the standardized incidence rates in women were higher than in the United States by 1988 and 1992, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Analysis trends in incidence rates avoids some weaknesses of AIDS statistics based on absolute numbers, and should become one of the standard tools for AIDS surveillance.
PubMed ID
7986418 View in PubMed
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493 records – page 1 of 50.