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4th European Public Health Conference 2011 in Copenhagen: Public Health and Welfare--Welfare Development and Health .

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137620
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Feb;39(1):1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Finn Kamper-Jørgensen
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Feb;39(1):1-2
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Europe
Health promotion
Humans
Public Health
World Health
PubMed ID
21266586 View in PubMed
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24th European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278271
Source
Immunotherapy. 2016;8(4):395-7
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2016
Author
Anja C Rasch
Source
Immunotherapy. 2016;8(4):395-7
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Animals
Denmark
Dermatologists
Dermatology - trends
Europe
Humans
Skin Diseases - immunology
Societies, Scientific
Venereology - trends
Abstract
The 24th European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology was held in Copenhagen, Denmark, from 7-11 October 2015. It has become Europe's biggest meeting of its kind with roughly 10,000 participants, approximately 3000 abstracts and about 180 exhibitors from all over the world. The organizers offer a venue for the latest cutting edge research and newest developments. Thus, their goal is to foster progress in clinical care and promote scientific excellence related to dermatovenereology for the benefit of patients with skin diseases.
PubMed ID
26973121 View in PubMed
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Absence of association between the INSIG2 gene polymorphism (rs7566605) and obesity in the European Youth Heart Study (EYHS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95295
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009 Jul;17(7):1453-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Vimaleswaran Karani S
Franks Paul W
Brage Soren
Sardinha Luis B
Andersen Lars B
Wareham Nicholas J
Ekelund Ulf
Loos Ruth J F
Author Affiliation
MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge, UK.
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009 Jul;17(7):1453-7
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Estonia
Europe
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - genetics
Lipids - blood
Male
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Obesity - blood - ethnology - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Waist Circumference - genetics
Abstract
The first genome-wide association study for BMI identified a polymorphism, rs7566605, 10 kb upstream of the insulin-induced gene 2 (INSIG2) transcription start site, as the most significantly associated variant in children and adults. Subsequent studies, however, showed inconsistent association of this polymorphism with obesity traits. This polymorphism has been hypothesized to alter INSIG2 expression leading to inhibition of fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis. Hence, we investigated the association of the INSIG2 rs7566605 polymorphism with obesity- and lipid-related traits in Danish and Estonian children (930 boys and 1,073 girls) from the European Youth Heart Study (EYHS), a school-based, cross-sectional study of pre- and early pubertal children. The association between the polymorphism and obesity traits was tested using additive and recessive models adjusted for age, age-group, gender, maturity and country. Interactions were tested by including the interaction terms in the model. Despite having sufficient power (98%) to detect the previously reported effect size for association with BMI, we did not find significant effects of rs7566605 on BMI (additive, P = 0.68; recessive, P = 0.24). Accordingly, the polymorphism was not associated with overweight (P = 0.87) or obesity (P = 0.34). We also did not find association with waist circumference (WC), sum of four skinfolds, or with total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, or high-density lipoprotein. There were no gender-specific (P = 0.55), age-group-specific (P = 0.63) or country-specific (P = 0.56) effects. There was also no evidence of interaction between genotype and physical activity (P = 0.95). Despite an adequately powered study, our findings suggest that rs7566605 is not associated with obesity-related traits and lipids in the EYHS.
PubMed ID
19197262 View in PubMed
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Absence of indigenous specific West Nile virus antibodies in Tyrolean blood donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134646
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Jan;31(1):77-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
S T Sonnleitner
J. Simeoni
E. Schmutzhard
M. Niedrig
F. Ploner
H. Schennach
M P Dierich
G. Walder
Author Affiliation
Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, Medical University Innsbruck, Fritz Pregl Straße 1-3/III, Innsbruck, Austria. sissyson@gmx.at
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Jan;31(1):77-81
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Blood Donors
Child, Preschool
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - immunology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Europe
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Neutralization Tests
West Nile Fever - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
West Nile virus - immunology
Abstract
In the last several years, West Nile virus (WNV) was proven to be present especially in the neighboring countries of Austria, such as Italy, Hungary, and the Czech Republic, as well as in eastern parts of Austria, where it was detected in migratory and domestic birds. In summer 2010, infections with WNV were reported from Romania and northern Greece with about 150 diseased and increasingly fatal cases. We tested the sera of 1,607 blood donors from North Tyrol (Austria) and South Tyrol (Italy) for antibodies against WNV by using IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Initial results of the ELISA tests showed seroprevalence rates of 46.2% in North Tyrol and 0.5% in South Tyrol, which turned out to be false-positive cross-reactions with antibodies against tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) by adjacent neutralization assays. These results indicate that seropositivity against WNV requires confirmation by neutralization assays, as cross-reactivity with TBEV is frequent and because, currently, WNV is not endemic in the study area.
PubMed ID
21556676 View in PubMed
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Abstracts. Seventh annual meeting. The European Society for Paediatric Haematology and Immunology. Oslo, Norway, June 11-13, 1979.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41315
Source
Pediatr Res. 1979 Aug;13(8):948-57
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Aug-1979

Act No. 223, amending the Marriage and Divorce Act, 22 April 1987.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38577
Source
Annu Rev Popul Law. 1988;15:72
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Source
Annu Rev Popul Law. 1988;15:72
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Crime
Denmark
Developed Countries
Divorce
Domestic Violence
Europe
Legislation
Marriage
Scandinavia
Social Problems
Abstract
This Law amends the Marriage and Divorce Act of Denmark to provide that a spouse has the right to obtain a divorce when the other spouse deliberately has committed serious violence toward the first spouse or the children.
PubMed ID
12289667 View in PubMed
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Act No. 350 of 24 May 1989 amending the Act on the termination of pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65344
Source
Annu Rev Popul Law. 1989;16:28
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Source
Annu Rev Popul Law. 1989;16:28
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Delivery of Health Care
Denmark
Developed Countries
Ethics
Europe
Family Planning Services
Health
Health Personnel
Scandinavia
Abstract
This Danish Act repeals subsections 2 and 3 of section 10 of the Act on the termination of pregnancy and replaces them with the following language: "2) Physicians, nurses, midwives, and assistant nurses shall, if they so request, be absolved from carrying out or participating in termination of pregnancy if it is contrary to their ethical or religious views. The foregoing shall also apply to persons undergoing training for one of these professions."
PubMed ID
12344366 View in PubMed
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Act No. 372 of 7 June 1989 on registered partnerships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38223
Source
Annu Rev Popul Law. 1989;16:56
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Source
Annu Rev Popul Law. 1989;16:56
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior
Denmark
Developed Countries
Divorce
Economics
Europe
Financial Management
Homosexuality
Legislation
Marriage
Ownership
Scandinavia
Sexual Behavior
Social Welfare
Socioeconomic Factors
Taxes
Wills
Abstract
This Danish law authorizes persons of the same sex to register their partnership and be treated legally in most cases as persons in heterosexual partnerships are treated, notably with respect to marriage, divorce, succession, and social and tax laws. Nonetheless, persons in such partnerships are not treated the same as heterosexuals with respect to adoption of children and the right to obtain a religious celebration of their partnership.
PubMed ID
12344468 View in PubMed
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Act respecting the family allowance for children, No. 147, 19 March 1986, and Act respecting children's allowances and the advance payment of children's subsidies, No. 350, 4 June 1986.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38576
Source
Annu Rev Popul Law. 1988;15:91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Source
Annu Rev Popul Law. 1988;15:91
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aid to Families with Dependent Children
Demography
Denmark
Developed Countries
Europe
Family Planning Policy
Geography
Legislation
Population
Public Policy
Residence Characteristics
Scandinavia
Abstract
In 1986, Denmark's family allowance scheme was modified by these two Acts with effect from 1 July 1987. The regular allowance and the youth allowance were abolished by the second Act and replaced by the first Act with a single allowance "for children in the family" payable with respect to every child under the age of 18. The new allowance is payable quarterly and set at DKr 1250 per quarter. Payment of the allowance is taxable in Denmark, but no longer conditional on the child being permanently resident in Denmark. Allowances are no longer dependent on the income of parents and are adjusted by a percentage fixed by law every year, rather than by the cost of living.
PubMed ID
12289714 View in PubMed
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Adaptive and plastic responses of Quercus petraea populations to climate across Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286725
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2017 Jul;23(7):2831-2847
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Cuauhtémoc Sáenz-Romero
Jean-Baptiste Lamy
Alexis Ducousso
Brigitte Musch
François Ehrenmann
Sylvain Delzon
Stephen Cavers
Wladyslaw Chalupka
Said Dagdas
Jon Kehlet Hansen
Steve J Lee
Mirko Liesebach
Hans-Martin Rau
Achilleas Psomas
Volker Schneck
Wilfried Steiner
Niklaus E Zimmermann
Antoine Kremer
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2017 Jul;23(7):2831-2847
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
Climate change
Denmark
Europe
France
Norway
Quercus - growth & development
Abstract
How temperate forests will respond to climate change is uncertain; projections range from severe decline to increased growth. We conducted field tests of sessile oak (Quercus petraea), a widespread keystone European forest tree species, including more than 150 000 trees sourced from 116 geographically diverse populations. The tests were planted on 23 field sites in six European countries, in order to expose them to a wide range of climates, including sites reflecting future warmer and drier climates. By assessing tree height and survival, our objectives were twofold: (i) to identify the source of differential population responses to climate (genetic differentiation due to past divergent climatic selection vs. plastic responses to ongoing climate change) and (ii) to explore which climatic variables (temperature or precipitation) trigger the population responses. Tree growth and survival were modeled for contemporary climate and then projected using data from four regional climate models for years 2071-2100, using two greenhouse gas concentration trajectory scenarios each. Overall, results indicated a moderate response of tree height and survival to climate variation, with changes in dryness (either annual or during the growing season) explaining the major part of the response. While, on average, populations exhibited local adaptation, there was significant clinal population differentiation for height growth with winter temperature at the site of origin. The most moderate climate model (HIRHAM5-EC; rcp4.5) predicted minor decreases in height and survival, while the most extreme model (CCLM4-GEM2-ES; rcp8.5) predicted large decreases in survival and growth for southern and southeastern edge populations (Hungary and Turkey). Other nonmarginal populations with continental climates were predicted to be severely and negatively affected (Bercé, France), while populations at the contemporary northern limit (colder and humid maritime regions; Denmark and Norway) will probably not show large changes in growth and survival in response to climate change.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27885754 View in PubMed
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433 records – page 1 of 44.