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148 records – page 1 of 15.

[4 years after Chernobyl: medical repercussions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25355
Source
Bull Cancer. 1990;77(5):419-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
D. Hubert
Source
Bull Cancer. 1990;77(5):419-28
Date
1990
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Abortion, Habitual - epidemiology
Blood Cell Count
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Decontamination - methods
Diarrhea - etiology
English Abstract
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Psychophysiologic Disorders - etiology
Pulmonary Fibrosis - etiology
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Skin - radiation effects
Triage
Ukraine
Abstract
The nuclear accident at Chernobyl accounted for an acute radiation syndrome in 237 persons on the site. Triage was the initial problem and was carried out according to clinical and biological criteria; evaluating the doses received was based on these criteria. Thirty one persons died and only 1 survived a dose higher than 6 Gy. Skin radiation burns which were due to inadequate decontamination, greatly worsened prognosis. The results of 13 bone marrow transplantations were disappointing, with only 2 survivors. Some time after the accident, these severely irradiated patients are mainly suffering from psychosomatic disorders, in the USSR, some areas have been significantly contaminated and several measures were taken to mitigate the impact on population: evacuating 135,000 persons, distributing prophylactic iodine, establishing standards and controls on foodstuff. Radiation phobia syndrome which developed in many persons, is the only sanitary effect noticed up to now. Finally, in Europe, there was only an increase in induced abortions and this was totally unwarranted. If we consider the risk of radiation induced cancer, an effect might not be demonstrated.
PubMed ID
2205311 View in PubMed
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[Accidents and accident mortality in Denmark--a comparison with Scandinavia and Europe]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11630
Source
Nord Med. 1994;109(10):265-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
T B Hansen
N D Röck
A. Poulstrup
S. Sabroe
J. Steensberg
B. Netterstrøm
Author Affiliation
Ortopaedkirurgisk afd 0 og Ulykkes Analyse Gruppen, Odense Universitets Hospital.
Source
Nord Med. 1994;109(10):265-8
Date
1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, occupational - mortality
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholic Intoxication - mortality
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Poisoning - mortality
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
As the development in mean age of the population and life expectancy has been less favourable in Denmark than in the rest of Western Europe, the Ministry of Health decided to investigate statistics for the period, 1972-1990, for the main areas where Danish life expectancy was poorer. A sharp increase in the incidence of accidental poisoning with medical drugs and alcohol during the period was found to be a factor contributing to the poorer Danish statistics during the period. In the subcategory, death after a fall, there was an increase in incidence among the elderly, but the loss of life-years remained constant. The subcategory, fatal road accidents, manifested a marked reduction in incidence, despite the increase in traffic density during the period, and there was a reduction in the loss of life-years. Thus, in the category, accidental deaths, the increase in the incidence of accidental poisonings would appear to be the only factor contributing to the poorer development in mean age and life expectancy in Denmark.
PubMed ID
7937021 View in PubMed
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[Adult body height in women in Cordoba, Argentina, and exploration of the current trend (1978-198)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33466
Source
Rev Panam Salud Publica. 1999 Jan;5(1):17-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
F. Agrelo
L R Pascual
B. Lobo
J. Sabulsky
Author Affiliation
Ministerio de Salud de la Provincia de Córdoba, Departamento de Maternidad e Infancia, Argentina.
Source
Rev Panam Salud Publica. 1999 Jan;5(1):17-22
Date
Jan-1999
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Argentina
Body Height
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Europe
Female
Growth
Humans
Japan
Nutritional Status
Reference Standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Abstract
The objective of this work was to contribute local data concerning the full adult height of women in Cordoba, Argentina, and to explore the possibility of a secular trend in their heights. For the study, 513 women were examined during May and June 1994. All of the women were between 18 and 40 years of age and were mothers of children who were included in a study on lactation, feeding, growth, and development in Córdoba. The measurements were carried out applying standardized techniques and using as a reference standard the 50th-percentile level data from the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. The mean full height of the Córdoba population studied was 157.9 cm, 0.97 standard deviation (SD) below the reference norm. For the women from the highest of six socioeconomic strata, the mean height was 159.7 cm (-0.67 SD); the mean for women from the lowest stratum was 156.2 cm (-1.25 SD). The difference in the means of those two socioeconomic groups was statistically significant (P
PubMed ID
10050610 View in PubMed
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[Aerobic capacity in children and adolescents--Nordic results over the past 45 years]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33698
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Aug 30;118(20):3106-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-1998
Author
P M Fredriksen
E. Thaulow
W. Nystad
F. Ingjer
Author Affiliation
Barnehjerteseksionen Rikshospitalet, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Aug 30;118(20):3106-10
Date
Aug-30-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Europe
Exercise - physiology
Female
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Oxygen consumption
Scandinavia
Abstract
The aim of this study was to reveal whether today's children and adolescents have lower aerobic capacity compared with earlier studies. Aerobic capacity may be defined as the highest amount of oxygen a subject is able to consume per unit of time. Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) is often used as a measure of aerobic capacity in children. VO2peak in 196 healthy children and adolescents of both sexes, aged 8-16 years, was measured on a graded treadmill test. The mean results of VO2peak (l.min-1) showed only small differences compared with previous studies in Scandinavia. There was, however, greater dispersion in the present study when the VO2peak-values were corrected for weight (ml.kg-1.min-1) than in the earlier studies. When compared to other countries in Europe, Norwegian subjects achieved higher values. The reason may be due to either genetic differences or to a higher level of physical activity among the Norwegian subjects.
PubMed ID
9760851 View in PubMed
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[[Aging of the population and social policy: lessons from Sweden].]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73181
Source
Jinkogaku Kenkyu. 1994 May;(17):5-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
N. Maruo
Source
Jinkogaku Kenkyu. 1994 May;(17):5-14
Date
May-1994
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Birth rate
Demography
Developed Countries
Economics
Employment
English Abstract
Europe
Fertility
Financial Management
Financing, Government
Health Manpower
Income
Marriage
Population
Population Characteristics
Population Dynamics
Scandinavia
Social Security
Sweden
Abstract
"In this paper I tried to show how the ageing of the population influences the change in the growth of employment, employment structure, the savings ratio, economic growth and the cost of social security [in Sweden]. In the latter part of the paper I suggested a close correlation between the average marriage age of women, the total fertility rate and the work participation ratio of women." (SUMMARY IN ENG)
PubMed ID
12319307 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Feb 10;116(4):471
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1996

Alcohol advertising bans and alcohol abuse: an international perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226519
Source
J Health Econ. 1991 May;10(1):65-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1991
Author
H. Saffer
Author Affiliation
National Bureau of Economic Research, New York University, NY 10003.
Source
J Health Econ. 1991 May;10(1):65-79
Date
May-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Advertising as Topic - legislation & jurisprudence
Alcohol Drinking - legislation & jurisprudence
Alcoholic Beverages - utilization
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis - mortality
Models, Statistical
Public Policy
United States - epidemiology
World Health
Abstract
This paper examines the effect of banning broadcast advertising of alcoholic beverages. The data used in this study are a pooled time series from 17 countries for the period 1970 to 1983. The empirical results show that countries with bans on spirits advertising have about 16% lower alcohol consumption than countries with no bans and that countries with bans on beer and wine advertising have about 11% lower alcohol consumption than countries with bans only on spirits advertising.
Notes
Comment In: J Health Econ. 1993 Jul;12(2):213-2810127781
PubMed ID
10112150 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol, breast cancer and causal inference in epidemiology]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10956
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Oct 30;117(26):3771-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1997
Author
K. Kjaerheim
Author Affiliation
Institutt for epidemiologisk kreftforskning, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Oct 30;117(26):3771-6
Date
Oct-30-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Canada - epidemiology
Causality
Clinical Trials
English Abstract
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Meta-Analysis
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
In order to demonstrate how possible causal relationships are critically evaluated in epidemiologic research, literature on the association between alcohol and breast cancer is reviewed and discussed. A cause can be defined as a factor which, in combination with other factors, known and unknown, is sufficient to produce an effect. Since the hypothesis-generating study was published in 1977, a total of 34 positive and 16 negative studies have been published. Methodological problems, such as chance, bias and confounding, cannot be considered as plausible explanations for the above majority of positive findings. The question of causality was then evaluated using the guidelines developed by Bradford Hill in 1965. Among these, the strength of the association, consistency, temporality, biological gradient and biological plausibility, are the most important. In spite of the relatively weak association and somewhat inconsistent results, it is concluded that alcohol consumption should be considered as a cause of breast cancer. It is estimated that in Norway, between 24 and 180 cases of breast cancer may be attributed to alcohol consumption. Future research should focus on the question of effect-modification and on the possible implications of different patterns of alcohol consumption.
PubMed ID
9417679 View in PubMed
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Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for leukemia in Europe: regional differences. Report from the Leukemia Working party of the European Group for Bone Marrow Transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25241
Source
Bone Marrow Transplant. 1990 Mar;5(3):159-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
Author
A. Gratwohl
J. Hermans
A J Barrett
P. Ernst
F. Frassoni
G. Gahrton
A. Granena
H J Kolb
H G Prentice
J P Vernant
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Basel, Switzerland.
Source
Bone Marrow Transplant. 1990 Mar;5(3):159-65
Date
Mar-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bone Marrow Transplantation - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Graft vs Host Disease - prevention & control
Humans
Infant
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute - mortality - surgery
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - mortality - surgery
Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic - mortality - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Proportional Hazards Models
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Abstract
The results of 1904 allogeneic HLA identical sibling donor bone marrow transplants performed in 52 European centers between 1979 and 1986 and reported to the EBMT leukemia registry were analysed by geographical location of the transplant. Patients were grouped into six regions: United Kingdom, Nordic Group, Benelux, France, Central Europe and Southern Europe. There were significant differences between these regions with respect to patient population and outcome. The relative proportion of the three major disease categories, stage and subtype of the diseases, graft-versus-host disease prevention methods, donor recipient sex combinations, age of the patient, year of the transplant and the time intervals from diagnosis to transplant, from diagnosis to first complete remission for acute leukemia and the time from first complete remission to the transplant varied from region to region. The analysis of outcome parameters showed a significant difference in relapse incidence from region to region. This influence of region was confirmed in a multivariate analysis and was independent of the other factors known to affect outcome. Leukemia-free survival and transplant-related mortality were not different. The reasons for these differences could not be explained by the data in the registry. We conclude that regional factors must be considered when bone marrow transplant data are compared and we postulate that pretransplant factors probably affect outcome more than was previously realized.
PubMed ID
2331536 View in PubMed
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148 records – page 1 of 15.