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The ECO.SENS Project: a prospective, multinational, multicentre epidemiological survey of the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of urinary tract pathogens--interim report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196820
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2000 Sep;46 Suppl 1:15-22; discussion 63-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
G. Kahlmeter
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Central Hospital, Växjö, Sweden. gunnar.kahlmeter@ltkronoberg.se
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2000 Sep;46 Suppl 1:15-22; discussion 63-5
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Canada - epidemiology
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Enterobacteriaceae - classification - drug effects - isolation & purification
Enterobacteriaceae Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
International Cooperation
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Urinary Tract Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
The ECO.SENS Project is the first international survey to investigate the prevalence and susceptibility of pathogens causing community-acquired, uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) in women. At 240 centres in 17 countries, female patients presenting with symptoms of uncomplicated UTIs were asked to provide a urine sample for testing for the presence of leucocytes and bacteria. The bacteria were identified and their susceptibility to 12 antibiotics commonly used in the treatment of UTIs was determined. The objective of the survey was to collect 5000 urine samples to obtain approximately 3500 isolates of defined uropathogens. This interim report includes the results from 1960 urine samples, 75% of which contained a uropathogen. Escherichia coli accounted for the majority (80%) of uropathogens isolated in all 17 countries. The rates of resistance among E. coli strains were: ampicillin and sulphamethoxazole, 30%; trimethoprim alone or with sulphamethoxazole, 15%; nalidixic acid, 6%; ciprofloxacin, 3%; amoxycillin-clavulanic acid, mecillinam, cefadroxil, nitrofurantoin and fosfomycin,
PubMed ID
11051619 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology and control of antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179269
Source
Curr Opin Infect Dis. 2004 Aug;17(4):309-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Jean Carlet
Adel Ben Ali
Annie Chalfine
Author Affiliation
Intensive Care Unit, Fondation Hôpital Saint-Joseph, 185, rue Raymond Losserand, 75014 Paris, France. jcarlet@hopital-saint-joseph.org
Source
Curr Opin Infect Dis. 2004 Aug;17(4):309-16
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteremia - epidemiology - prevention & control
Canada - epidemiology
Cross Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Infection Control - methods
Intensive Care Units
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Resistance to antibiotics is very high in the intensive care units of many countries, although there are several exceptions. Some infections are becoming extremely difficult to treat. The risk of cross-transmission of those strains is very high. This review focuses on recent data (2003 to the present) that may help understanding and dealing with this serious public health problem.
Intensive care units can be considered as 'factories' for creating, disseminating and amplifying resistance to antibiotics, for many reasons: importation of resistant microorganisms at admission, selection of resistant strains with an extensive use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, cross-transmission of resistant strains via the hands or the environment. Some national programs can be considered as failures, as in the UK and the USA. Other countries have been able to maintain a low level of resistance (Scandinavian countries, Netherlands, Switzerland, Germany, Canada). There is clearly an 'inoculum effect' above which preventive measures become poorly efficient. Several preventive measures have been proposed including preventive isolation, systematic screening at admission, local, national or international antibiotic guidelines, antibiotic prescriptions advice by infectious-disease teams, antibiotic prevention with selective digestive decontamination, antibiotic strategies such as 'cycling', or rather, for some authors, the use of an 'à la carte' antibiotic strategy which could be considered as a 'patient-to-patient antibiotic rotation'.
There is obviously an international concern regarding the level of resistance to antibiotics in the intensive-care-unit setting. A strong program including prevention of cross-transmission and better usage of antibiotics seems to be needed in order to be successful. We do not know if this kind of program will enable countries with a very high endemic level of resistance to decrease the level in future years.
PubMed ID
15241074 View in PubMed
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