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The sero-epidemiology of diphtheria in Western Europe. ESEN Project. European Sero-Epidemiology Network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32490
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2000 Aug;125(1):113-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
W J Edmunds
R G Pebody
H. Aggerback
S. Baron
G. Berbers
M A Conyn-van Spaendonck
H O Hallander
R. Olander
P A Maple
H E Melker
P. Olin
F. Fievret-Groyne
C. Rota
S. Salmaso
A. Tischer
C. von-Hunolstein
E. Miller
Author Affiliation
PHLS Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre, London, UK.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2000 Aug;125(1):113-25
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Diphtheria - blood - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Diphtheria Antitoxin - blood - immunology
Diphtheria Toxoid
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Immunization Schedule
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sex Factors
Abstract
Seven countries in Western Europe collected large, representative serum banks across the entire age range and tested them for diphtheria anti-toxin (sample size ranged from 2991 to 7715). Although a variety of assays were used, the results were all standardized to those of a reference laboratory and expressed in international units. The standardization process, and the availability of similar, large data sets allowed comparative analyses to be performed in which a high degree of confidence could be ascribed to observed epidemiological differences. The results showed that there were large differences in the proportion of adults with insufficient levels of protection amongst different countries. For instance, roughly 35% of 50- to 60-year-olds were found to be seronegative (titre 90%) but the accelerated schedule in the United Kingdom appears to result in lower anti-toxin titres than elsewhere. In Sweden, booster doses are not offered until 10 years of age which results in large numbers of children with inadequate levels of protection. Although the United Kingdom and Sweden both have higher proportions of seronegative children than elsewhere the likelihood of a resurgence of diphtheria in these countries seems remote.
Notes
Erratum In: Epidemiol Infect 2001 Apr;126(2):331
PubMed ID
11057967 View in PubMed
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Sero-epidemiology of mumps in western Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30756
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2003 Aug;131(1):691-701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
A. Nardone
R G Pebody
S. van den Hof
D. Levy-Bruhl
A M Plesner
M C Rota
A. Tischer
N. Andrews
G. Berbers
P. Crovari
W J Edmunds
G. Gabutti
P. Saliou
E. Miller
Author Affiliation
PHLS Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre, 61 Colindale Avenue, London, NW9 SEQ, UK.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2003 Aug;131(1):691-701
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Health Policy
Health Surveys
Humans
Immunization Programs
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infection Control
Male
Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine - administration & dosage - immunology
Middle Aged
Mumps - epidemiology - prevention & control
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
Six countries (Denmark, England and Wales, France, Germany, Italy and The Netherlands) conducted large serological surveys for mumps, in the mid-1990s, as part of the European Sero-Epidemiology Network (ESEN). The assay results were standardized and related to the schedules and coverage of the immunization programmes and the reported incidence of mumps. Low incidence of disease and few susceptibles amongst adolescents and young adults was observed in countries with high mumps vaccine coverage (e.g. The Netherlands). High disease incidence and large proportions of mumps virus antibody negative samples in adolescent and young adult age groups was noted in countries with poor vaccine coverage (e.g. Italy). The build-up of susceptibles in older children and adolescents in England and Wales, France, the former West Germany and Italy indicate the possibility of further mumps outbreaks in secondary school environments. To control mumps in western Europe, current MMR immunization programmes will need to be strengthened in a number of countries. Sero-surveillance of mumps is an important component of disease control and its usefulness will be enhanced by the development of an international mumps standard.
PubMed ID
12948369 View in PubMed
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The seroepidemiology of rubella in western Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32421
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2000 Oct;125(2):347-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
R G Pebody
W J Edmunds
M. Conyn-van Spaendonck
P. Olin
G. Berbers
I. Rebiere
H. Lecoeur
P. Crovari
I. Davidkin
G. Gabutti
E. Gerike
C. Giordano
L. Hesketh
A M Plesner
M. Raux
M C Rota
S. Salmaso
A. Tischer
M. Valle
E. Miller
Author Affiliation
Immunisation Division, PHLS Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre, London, UK.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2000 Oct;125(2):347-57
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Antibody formation
Child
Child, Preschool
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Immunization Programs
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rubella - epidemiology - immunology
Rubella Vaccine
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
Most of the countries in western Europe have now implemented mass infant rubella immunization programmes, instead of or in addition to selective vaccination in order to achieve the elimination of congenital rubella syndrome. The European countries Denmark, England and Wales, Finland, France, Germany, Italy and the Netherlands undertook large, national serological surveys collecting several thousand serum specimens during 1994-8. Antibodies against rubella virus were detected by a variety of enzyme immuno-assays. Comparability of the assay results was achieved by a standardized methodology. The age- and sex-stratified serological results were related to the schedules, coverage of rubella vaccination and the incidence in these countries. The results show widely differing levels of immunity to rubella both in the general population and in the specific age groups of males and females. A low rate (
Notes
Erratum In: Epidemiol Infect 2001 Apr;126(2):333
PubMed ID
11117958 View in PubMed
Less detail