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Children's dental health in Europe: caries experience of 5- and 12-year-old children from eight EU countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34649
Source
Int J Paediatr Dent. 1996 Sep;6(3):155-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
A K Bolin
A. Bolin
G. Koch
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Paediatr Dent. 1996 Sep;6(3):155-62
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
DMF Index
Dental Care for Children - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Observer Variation
Pit and Fissure Sealants
Abstract
Data on the current dental health of 5- and 12-year-old children from eight European countries has been collected by calibrated examiners. In each country a random sample of 200 children in each age group was drawn from urban primary and secondary state schools, a total of 3200 subjects. The children were examined under standardized conditions by one or two examiners in each country, all of whom had been trained and calibrated to the Swedish reference examiner and had achieved good inter- and intra-examiner consistency. Mean dmft DMFT were 1.38/1.93 in Gent (Belgium), 2.99/2.58 in Berlin (Germany), 1.62/2.35 in Athens (Greece), 2.09/1.85 in Cork (Ireland), 2.81/2.24 in Sassari (Italy), 3.06/1-82 in Dundee (Scotland), 0.85/1.75 in Valencia (Spain), and 0.80/1.94 in Stockholm (Sweden). The major components in the dmft/DMFT indices varied. Among the 5-year-old children the m component predominated in the Scottish sample, the d and f components in Berlin and the d component in Sassari. Among the 12-year-olds, a high F component influenced the index in Berlin and Stockholm, whereas in Athens and Sassari the D component was relatively high. The frequency of fissure sealants was most frequent in the Scottish. Irish and Belgian samples of 12-year-olds.
PubMed ID
9115970 View in PubMed
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Children's dental health in Europe. Clinical calibration of dental examiners in eight EU countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35472
Source
Swed Dent J. 1995;19(5):183-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
A K Bolin
A. Bolin
G. Koch
L. Alfredsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 1995;19(5):183-93
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Attitude to Health
Calibration
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
DMF Index
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Europe - epidemiology
European Union
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Observer Variation
Oral Health
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Abstract
An epidemiological investigation has been initiated from Sweden with the aim to study and compare dental health, dental treatment needs and attitudes to dental care in two well-defined age-groups, children of 5 and 12 years of age, in eight EU countries. To ensure comparability of the clinical registrations, data collection was preceded by clinical calibrations of the examiners from the participating countries. All the examiners participated in a workshop with initial calibration exercises. Agreement, expressed as sensitivity, was measured between the Swedish examiner acting as the reference examiner and each of the other examiners in turn, and assessed separately for the two age-groups. For DMFS/dmfs, agreement ranged from 44.3% to 82.2%. These results were discussed and where necessary the criteria were modified and/or made more stringent, so that they were clearcut and could be adhered to consistently. In a second calibration between the Swedish and the national examiner undertaken in each of the seven countries, the inter-examiner agreement (sensitivity) varied between 85.4% and 100%. The mean sensitivity for DMFS/dmfs after the total calibration procedures was 89.5% for the 12-year olds and 91.7 for the 5-year olds. The mean sensitivity for both age-groups together was 90.6% and the corresponding value for specificity was 98.9%.
PubMed ID
8614899 View in PubMed
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Oral hygiene in relation to caries development and immigrant status in infants and toddlers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35644
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1994 Oct;102(5):269-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1994
Author
L K Wendt
A L Hallonsten
G. Koch
D. Birkhed
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Dental Care, County of Jönköping, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1994 Oct;102(5):269-73
Date
Oct-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Dental Caries - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Dental Plaque - epidemiology - prevention & control
Emigration and Immigration
Europe - ethnology
Fluorides - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Gingivitis - epidemiology
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Oral Hygiene
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Tablets
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Toothpaste
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe oral hygiene factors in infants and toddlers living in Sweden with special reference to caries prevalence at 2 and 3 yr of age and to immigrant status. The study was designed as a prospective, longitudinal study starting with 671 children aged 1 yr. At 3 yr, all the children were invited to a further examination. A total of 298 children, randomly selected from the original group, were also examined at 2 yr. The accompanying parent was interviewed about the child's oral health habits. Children who were free of caries at 3 yr had had their teeth brushed more frequently at 1 and 2 yr of age, had used fluoride (F)-toothpaste more often at 2 yr of age, and had a lower prevalence of visible plaque at 1 and 2 yr of age than children with caries. Immigrant children had had their teeth brushed less frequently, had used less F-toothpaste, and had a higher prevalence of visible plaque at 1 yr of age than nonimmigrant children. Early establishment of good oral hygiene habits and regular use of F-toothpaste seem to be important for achieving good oral health in pre-schoolchildren.
PubMed ID
7817151 View in PubMed
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