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Maternal Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus infections and risk of testicular cancer in the offspring: a nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91154
Source
APMIS. 2008 Sep;116(9):816-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Holl Katsiaryna
Surcel Helja-Marja
Koskela Pentti
Dillner Joakim
Hallmans Göran
Wadell Göran
Kaasila Marjo
Olafsdottir Gudridur H
Ogmundsdottir Helga M
Pukkala Eero
Stattino Pär
Lehtinen Matti
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Health, National Public Health Institute, Oulu, Finland. katsiaryna.holl@uta.fi
Source
APMIS. 2008 Sep;116(9):816-22
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Cytomegalovirus - growth & development
Cytomegalovirus Infections - blood - epidemiology - virology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections - blood - epidemiology - virology
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Herpesvirus 4, Human - growth & development
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Young Adult
Abstract
During recent decades the incidence of testicular cancer (TC) has increased rapidly around the world. Associated exogenous etiological factors might therefore be identifiable. We performed a case-control study nested within Finnish, Swedish and Icelandic maternity cohorts exploiting early pregnancy serum samples to evaluate the role of congenital or neonatal infections with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) as risk factors of TC in the offspring. For each case-index mother pair, three or four matched control-control mother pairs were identified using national population registries. First trimester sera were retrieved from the index mothers of 66 TC cases and 258 matched control mothers, and were tested for antibodies to EBV and CMV. High level of maternal EBV IgG antibodies was associated with significantly increased risk of TC in the offspring (odds ratio (OR), 2.50; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.15, 5.40), especially with risk of non-seminoma TC (OR, 2.73; 950% CI, 1.25, 5.99) and non-seminoma TC diagnosed under 8 years of age (OR, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.05, 7.04). In contrast, offspring of CMV IgG-seropositive mothers had a decreased risk of TC diagnosed under 8 years of age (OR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.14, 0.89). Our results suggest that EBV and CMV infections may be associated with TC.
PubMed ID
19024602 View in PubMed
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Maternal smoking during pregnancy and testicular cancer in the sons: a nested case-control study and a meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89943
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2009 Jun;45(9):1640-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Tuomisto Jouko
Holl Katsiaryna
Rantakokko Panu
Koskela Pentti
Hallmans Göran
Wadell Göran
Stattin Pär
Dillner Joakim
Ogmundsdottir Helga M
Vartiainen Terttu
Lehtinen Matti
Pukkala Eero
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, THL (National Institute for Health and Welfare, Formerly National Public Health Institute), P. O. Box 95, Kuopio FI-70701, Finland. jouko.tuomisto@ktl.fi
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2009 Jun;45(9):1640-8
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Biological Markers - blood
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Cotinine - blood
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Smoking - blood - epidemiology
Testicular Neoplasms - embryology - epidemiology - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Some large ecological studies have noted a significant association of testicular cancer (TC) with maternal smoking during pregnancy, while several more controlled studies have been negative. It has been difficult to obtain reliable data on exposure because of the long lag time to cancer diagnosis. We performed a case-control study nested within Finnish, Swedish and Icelandic maternity cohorts exploiting early pregnancy serum samples to evaluate the role of maternal smoking in the risk of TC in the offspring. After reviewing the literature, we also performed a meta-analysis of published studies. For each index mother of the TC patient, three to nine matched control mothers with a cancer-free son born at the same time as the TC case were identified within each cohort. First trimester sera were retrieved from the 70 index mothers and 519 control mothers and were tested for cotinine level by a novel HPLC-MS-MS method developed. No statistically significant association between maternal cotinine level and risk of TC in the offspring was found (OR 0.68; 95% CI 0.35, 1.34). This is the first study based on individual exposure measurements. Its results agree with our meta-analysis of seven previous epidemiological studies (total number of 2149 cases, 2762 controls) using indirect exposure assessment (OR 1.0; 95% CI 0.88, 1.12).
PubMed ID
19231156 View in PubMed
Less detail