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[Childhood in flux--Part II: Modern times until today]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78062
Source
Prax Kinderpsychol Kinderpsychiatr. 2006;55(4):280-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Hardt Jochen
Hoffmann Sven Olaf
Author Affiliation
Universität Mainz. hardt@mail.uni-mainz.de
Source
Prax Kinderpsychol Kinderpsychiatr. 2006;55(4):280-92
Date
2006
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Abuse - history
Child Care - history
Child Welfare - history
Child, Preschool
Europe
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Infant
Object Attachment
United States
Abstract
At the end of the 19th century, the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children was founded in New York, after a barbarous case of neglect and abuse of a girl became public. From then on, children received more and more protection. Only in the 1950s were doctors in the USA bound by law to report cases of putative physical abuse to officials. In Sweden, physical punishment of children has been forbidden since 1989, and in Germany since 2001. The existence of sexual abuse of children had been a taboo subject for centuries, even though individual attempts to break that taboo were made--e. g., by S. Freud in the theory of seduction (Verführungstheorie). Only with the birth of the women's liberation movement in the early 1970s has public awareness arisen. Due to the work of J. Bowlby in the 1950s, it became clear that children of primates need more than air, water and food, namely a relationship between the child and an adult person (attachment). To what degree the basic needs of children are being fulfilled in Western societies today is still a controversial issue.
PubMed ID
17436561 View in PubMed
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[Epidemiology of cervical cancer (author's transl)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249161
Source
Arch Geschwulstforsch. 1978;48(3):250-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
Author
H. Berndt
D. Neuser
Source
Arch Geschwulstforsch. 1978;48(3):250-75
Date
1978
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Canada
Carcinoma in Situ - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Europe
Female
Germany, East
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Risk
Sexual Behavior
United States
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
There are remarkable differences of incidence and mortality from cervical cancer between countries and even within small countries. In developed industrial countries, incidence is slowly declining. Age distribution (middle--aged women are mostly afflicted) distinguishes cervical cancer from all other common malignant neoplasms. Known risk factors are: low social class, sexual activity early in youth, instable sexual relationships. Cervical cancer behaves like a veneral disease of low infectious power. Cervical cancer develops stepwise out of epithelial dysplasia and carcinoma in situ. The foundations of a cervical cancer control programme are laid: cytodiagnosis as screening method; well defined high risk groups; effective and not dangerous treatment of prephases and early stages of cancer. In the G.D.R. conditions for effective cancer control are good: cancer registration works stable for more than 20 years; it enables evaluation of effectivity. Cytologic screening can be fully integrated into basic gynecologic care. Medical care including prevention is free of fees and available for all women. The ultimate of goal of a cervical cancer control programme is primary prevention by detection and treatment of preneoplastic lesions (dysplasia and carcinoma in situ).
PubMed ID
356802 View in PubMed
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[Tuberculosis in developing countries compared to europe (author's transl)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42224
Source
MMW Munch Med Wochenschr. 1976 Aug 27;118(35):1103-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-27-1976
Author
K. Styblo
Source
MMW Munch Med Wochenschr. 1976 Aug 27;118(35):1103-8
Date
Aug-27-1976
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Austria
BCG Vaccine
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Denmark
Developing Countries
English Abstract
Europe
Humans
Infant
Netherlands
Norway
Prognosis
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
It is relatively easy to obtain a survey of the tuberculosis situation in the geographically demarcated countries of Europe. On the other hand it is impossible to acquire reliable and representative information on the majority of developing countries. Also the concept of a developing country cannot be accurately defined: the geographical, ethnic and cultural conditions predominating there may be diametrically different. In addition the paper is intended not only to take into account the present tuberculosis situation, but also to say something on the future development of tuberculosis in Europe and the developing countries during the next few years.
PubMed ID
822314 View in PubMed
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