Skip header and navigation

Refine By

8 records – page 1 of 1.

[An attempt at an historical analysis of epidemics of the XIV-XVII centuries].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104032
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1966 May;43(5):153-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1966 May

[Commentary from the viewpoint of an advocate. "Breast cancer mortality in organized mammography screening in Denmark--a comparative Study"].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100315
Source
Praxis (Bern 1994). 2010 Oct 6;99(20):1217-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-6-2010
Author
Beat Thürlimann
Author Affiliation
Brustzentrum Kantonsspital St. Gallen, St. Gallen. beat.thuerlimann@kssg.ch
Source
Praxis (Bern 1994). 2010 Oct 6;99(20):1217-8
Date
Oct-6-2010
Language
German
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - radiography
Early Diagnosis
Europe
Female
Humans
Mammography - utilization
Mass Screening - utilization
Neoplasm Staging
Sensitivity and specificity
Survival Rate
Notes
RefSource: Praxis (Bern 1994). 2010 Oct 6;99(20):1177-8
PubMed ID
20931497 View in PubMed
Less detail

Disparities in breast cancer mortality trends between 30 European countries: retrospective trend analysis of WHO mortality database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99253
Source
BMJ. 2010;341:c3620
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Philippe Autier
Mathieu Boniol
Carlo Lavecchia
Lars Vatten
Anna Gavin
Clarisse Héry
Mary Heanue
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. philippe.autier@i-pri.org
Source
BMJ. 2010;341:c3620
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - mortality
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine changes in temporal trends in breast cancer mortality in women living in 30 European countries. DESIGN: Retrospective trend analysis. Data source WHO mortality database on causes of deaths Subjects reviewed Female deaths from breast cancer from 1989 to 2006 MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in breast cancer mortality for all women and by age group (or=70 years) calculated from linear regressions of log transformed, age adjusted death rates. Joinpoint analysis was used to identify the year when trends in all age mortality began to change. RESULTS: From 1989 to 2006, there was a median reduction in breast cancer mortality of 19%, ranging from a 45% reduction in Iceland to a 17% increase in Romania. Breast cancer mortality decreased by >or=20% in 15 countries, and the reduction tended to be greater in countries with higher mortality in 1987-9. England and Wales, Northern Ireland, and Scotland had the second, third, and fourth largest decreases of 35%, 29%, and 30%, respectively. In France, Finland, and Sweden, mortality decreased by 11%, 12%, and 16%, respectively. In central European countries mortality did not decline or even increased during the period. Downward mortality trends usually started between 1988 and 1996, and the persistent reduction from 1999 to 2006 indicates that these trends may continue. The median changes in the age groups were -37% (range -76% to -14%) in women aged or=70 year olds. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in breast cancer mortality after 1988 varied widely between European countries, and the UK is among the countries with the largest reductions. Women aged
Notes
RefSource: BMJ. 2010;341:c4112
PubMed ID
20702548 View in PubMed
Less detail

Epidemiology and control of antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179269
Source
Curr Opin Infect Dis. 2004 Aug;17(4):309-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Jean Carlet
Adel Ben Ali
Annie Chalfine
Author Affiliation
Intensive Care Unit, Fondation Hôpital Saint-Joseph, 185, rue Raymond Losserand, 75014 Paris, France. jcarlet@hopital-saint-joseph.org
Source
Curr Opin Infect Dis. 2004 Aug;17(4):309-16
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteremia - epidemiology - prevention & control
Canada - epidemiology
Cross Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Infection Control - methods
Intensive Care Units
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Resistance to antibiotics is very high in the intensive care units of many countries, although there are several exceptions. Some infections are becoming extremely difficult to treat. The risk of cross-transmission of those strains is very high. This review focuses on recent data (2003 to the present) that may help understanding and dealing with this serious public health problem.
Intensive care units can be considered as 'factories' for creating, disseminating and amplifying resistance to antibiotics, for many reasons: importation of resistant microorganisms at admission, selection of resistant strains with an extensive use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, cross-transmission of resistant strains via the hands or the environment. Some national programs can be considered as failures, as in the UK and the USA. Other countries have been able to maintain a low level of resistance (Scandinavian countries, Netherlands, Switzerland, Germany, Canada). There is clearly an 'inoculum effect' above which preventive measures become poorly efficient. Several preventive measures have been proposed including preventive isolation, systematic screening at admission, local, national or international antibiotic guidelines, antibiotic prescriptions advice by infectious-disease teams, antibiotic prevention with selective digestive decontamination, antibiotic strategies such as 'cycling', or rather, for some authors, the use of an 'à la carte' antibiotic strategy which could be considered as a 'patient-to-patient antibiotic rotation'.
There is obviously an international concern regarding the level of resistance to antibiotics in the intensive-care-unit setting. A strong program including prevention of cross-transmission and better usage of antibiotics seems to be needed in order to be successful. We do not know if this kind of program will enable countries with a very high endemic level of resistance to decrease the level in future years.
PubMed ID
15241074 View in PubMed
Less detail

European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC): climate change page

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288467
Publication Type
Database
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC)
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Database
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Public Health
Climate change
Europe
Communicable diseases
Epidemics
Abstract
Established in 2005, ECDC is an EU agency aimed at strengthening Europe's defenses against infectious diseases. It is seated in Stockholm, Sweden.
Online Resources
Less detail
Source
Acta Oncol. 2010 Apr;49(3):298-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Hans-Olov Adami
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. Adami@hsph.harvard.edu
Source
Acta Oncol. 2010 Apr;49(3):298-304
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
U.S.
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disease Outbreaks
Europe - epidemiology
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mass Screening - adverse effects - methods
Neoplasm Staging
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Prostate-Specific Antigen - blood
Prostatic Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology - mortality - pathology - therapy
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Uncertainty
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Screening for prostate cancer with prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a simple blood test, is complex, controversial, intellectually challenging and ethically concerning. Sweden has contributed actively to the knowledge base for PSA screening in the last couple of years and a more informed debate is now possible. I will in this article summarize what we currently know about PSA testing. I discuss the closely related issues of the natural history of early-stage disease and the risks and benefits of radical local treatment. I propose that the mortality reduction following PSA screening is probably modest, whilst substantial harms are well documented. Furthermore, there is growing evidence that the PSA test is profoundly limited for screening purposes. I therefore concur with the growing number of health and professional agencies - notably outside the US - that advise against population screening with PSA. Through PSA screening the medical community has generated a pseudo-epidemic of over-diagnosed non-lethal prostate cancer. Molecular tools to distinguish innocent, over-diagnosed prostate cancer from lethal tumors that deserving curative treatment are necessary to improve screening test performance. To date, extensive attempts to identify molecular predictors of outcome have remained unsuccessful, and no ideal screening test is within sight.
Notes
RefSource: Acta Oncol. 2010 Apr;49(3):275-7
PubMed ID
20397765 View in PubMed
Less detail

Utilization of lower gastrointestinal endoscopy and fecal occult blood test in 11 European countries: evidence from the survey of health, aging and retirement in Europe (SHARE).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97151
Source
Endoscopy. 2010 Jul;42(7):546-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
C. Stock
H. Brenner
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
Source
Endoscopy. 2010 Jul;42(7):546-56
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colonoscopy
Utilization
Colorectal Neoplasms
Diagnosis
Epidemiology
Europe
Female
Helath surveys
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Methods
Middle Aged
Occult Blood
Prevalence
Sigmoidoscopy
Notes
RefSource: Endoscopy. 2010 Jul;42(7):576-7
PubMed ID
20432204 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.