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Biogeographic vulnerability to ocean acidification and warming in a marine bivalve.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293451
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Jan; 126:308-311
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2018
Author
Carl Van Colen
Anna Jansson
Alice Saunier
Thomas Lacoue-Labathe
Magda Vincx
Author Affiliation
Ghent University, Marine Biology Research Group, Krijgslaan 281 - S8, 9000 Gent, Belgium. Electronic address: carl.vancolen@ugent.be.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Jan; 126:308-311
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Acclimatization
Adaptation, Physiological
Animals
Bivalvia - drug effects - embryology - genetics
Carbon Dioxide - administration & dosage
Carbonates
Europe
Finland
Global warming
Hot Temperature
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Oceans and Seas
Seawater - chemistry
Temperature
Abstract
Anthropogenic CO2 emissions are rapidly changing seawater temperature, pH and carbonate chemistry. This study compares the embryonic development under high pCO2 conditions across the south-north distribution range of the marine clam Limecola balthica in NW Europe. The combined effects of elevated temperature and reduced pH on hatching success and size varied strongly between the three studied populations, with the Gulf of Finland population appearing most endangered under the conditions predicted to occur by 2100. These results demonstrate that the assessment of marine faunal population persistence to future climatic conditions needs to consider the interactive effects of co-occurring physico-chemical alterations in seawater within the local context that determines population fitness, adaptation potential and the system resilience to environmental change.
PubMed ID
29421102 View in PubMed
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[Five Year Dynamics of Main Clinical Symptoms in Patients With Ischemic Heart Disease in Russia in Comparison With Other Countries (the CLARIFY Registry)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300099
Source
Kardiologiia. 2017 Jan; (1):17-22
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Jan-2017
Author
S A Shalnova
R G Oganov On Behalf Of The Participants Registry Clarify
Author Affiliation
National Research Center for Preventive Medicine, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Kardiologiia. 2017 Jan; (1):17-22
Date
Jan-2017
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Coronary Artery Disease
Europe
Humans
Myocardial Ischemia
Prospective Studies
Registries
Russia
Abstract
The CLARIFY register (The prospeCtive observational LongitudinAl RegIstry oF patients with stable coronary arterY disease) combined data of outpatients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) from 45 countries including Russia. Purpose of this publication was to analyze dynamics of stable angina during 5 years of follow up in the Russian CLARIFY cohort compared with cohorts of patients from European and non-European countries.
Number of patients recruited in Russia was 2249.
During 5 years of observation proportion of angina decreased by 65.5, 39.5 and 37.0% in Russia, European and non-European countries, respectively. Proportion of patients with heart rate (HR)
PubMed ID
28290829 View in PubMed
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Perceived child eating behaviours and maternal migrant background.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301179
Source
Appetite. 2018 06 01; 125:302-313
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-01-2018
Author
Maria Somaraki
Karin Eli
Kimmo Sorjonen
Carl-Erik Flodmark
Claude Marcus
Myles S Faith
Christine Persson Osowski
Anna Ek
Paulina Nowicka
Author Affiliation
Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Appetite. 2018 06 01; 125:302-313
Date
06-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Africa, Northern
Asia
Child
Child Behavior
Child, Preschool
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Emigrants and Immigrants
Ethnic Groups
Europe
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Male
Middle East
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers
Obesity - epidemiology
Perception
Residence Characteristics
South America
Sweden - epidemiology
Transients and Migrants
Abstract
The Child Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (CEBQ) is a well-established instrument in the study of obesity-related eating behaviours among children. However, research using the CEBQ in multicultural samples is limited. This study aims to identify and examine differences in child eating behaviours as reported by Swedish-born and non-Swedish-born mothers living in Sweden. Mothers (n?=?1310, 74 countries of origin, mean age 36.5 years, 63.6% with higher education, 29.2% with overweight or obesity) of children aged 3-8 years (mean age 4.8 years, 18.1% with overweight or obesity) completed the CEBQ. Responses were analysed using CEBQ subscales Food Responsiveness, Emotional Overeating, Enjoyment of Food, and Desire to Drink, clustering into Food Approach, and subscales Satiety Responsiveness, Slowness in Eating, Emotional Undereating, and Food Fussiness, clustering into Food Avoidance. Data were compared across seven regional groups, divided by maternal place of birth: (1) Sweden (n?=?941), (2) Nordic and Western Europe (n?=?68), (3) Eastern and Southern Europe (n?=?97), (4) the Middle East and North Africa (n?=?110), (5) East, South and Southeast Asia (n?=?52), (6) Sub-Saharan Africa (n?=?16), and (7) Central and South America (n?=?26). Crude, partly and fully adjusted linear regression models controlled for child's age, gender and weight status, and mother's education, weight status and concern about child weight. The moderation effect of maternal concern about child weight was examined through interaction analyses. Results showed that while Food Approach and Food Avoidance behaviours were associated with maternal migrant background, associations for Food Fussiness were limited. Notably, mothers born in the Middle East and North Africa reported higher frequencies of both Food Approach (except for Enjoyment of Food) and Food Avoidance. The study highlights the importance of examining how regionally-specific maternal migrant background affects mothers' perceptions of child eating behaviours.
PubMed ID
29438715 View in PubMed
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Sex differences in mortality in migrants and the Swedish-born population: Is there a double survival advantage for immigrant women?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300280
Source
Int J Public Health. 2019 Apr; 64(3):377-386
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Anna Oksuzyan
Eleonora Mussino
Sven Drefahl
Author Affiliation
Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Konrad-Zuse-Straße 1, 18057, Rostock, Germany. oksuzyan@demogr.mpg.de.
Source
Int J Public Health. 2019 Apr; 64(3):377-386
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Asia - ethnology
Cause of Death
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Europe - ethnology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Sweden - ethnology
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In the present study, we examine whether the relationships between country of origin or reason for migration and mortality differ between men and women.
We apply hazard regression models on high-quality Swedish register data with nationwide coverage.
Relative to their Swedish counterparts, migrants from Nordic and East European (EU) countries and former Yugoslavia have higher mortality. This excess mortality among migrants relative to Swedes is more pronounced in men than in women. Migrants from Western and Southern European countries; Iran, Iraq, and Turkey; Central and South America; and Asia, have lower mortality than Swedes, and the size of the mortality reduction is similar in both sexes. The predictive effects of the reason for migration for mortality are also similar in migrant men and women.
This study provides little support for the hypothesis of a double survival advantage among immigrant women in Sweden. However, it does show that the excess mortality in migrants from Nordic and EU countries and former Yugoslavia relative to the Swedish-born population is more pronounced in men than in women.
PubMed ID
30799526 View in PubMed
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The use of palliative medications before death from prostate cancer: Swedish population-based study with a comparative overview of European data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294431
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2018 01; 88:101-108
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
Magdalena Lycken
Linda Drevin
Hans Garmo
Pär Stattin
Jan Adolfsson
Ingela Franck Lissbrant
Lars Holmberg
Anna Bill-Axelson
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: magdalena.lycken@surgsci.uu.se.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2018 01; 88:101-108
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acetaminophen - therapeutic use
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics, Opioid - therapeutic use
Androgen Antagonists - therapeutic use
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Cause of Death
Drug Therapy - methods - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Europe
Humans
Male
Palliative Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Prostatic Neoplasms - drug therapy - mortality
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Symptoms of terminal cancer have previously been reported as undertreated. The aim of this study was to assess the use of palliative medications before death from prostate cancer.
This Swedish register study included men who died from 2009 to 2012 with prostate cancer as the underlying cause of death. We assessed the proportion who collected a prescription of androgen deprivation therapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, paracetamol, opioids, glucocorticoids, antidepressants, anxiolytics and sedative-hypnotics and the differences in treatment related to age, time since diagnosis, educational level, close relatives and comorbidities. Data were collected from 3 years before death from prostate cancer.
We included 8326 men. The proportion who received opioids increased from 30% to 72% during the last year of life, and 67% received a strong opioid at the time of death. Antidepressants increased from 13% to 22%, anxiolytics from 9% to 27% and sedative-hypnotics from 21% to 33%. Men without close relatives and older men had lower probability to receive opioids (odds ratio [OR]: 0.56, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.47-0.66 for >85 years versus
PubMed ID
29216521 View in PubMed
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