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Cancer survival increases in Europe, but international differences remain wide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19583
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2001 Sep;37(13):1659-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
M. Sant
R. Capocaccia
M P Coleman
F. Berrino
G. Gatta
A. Micheli
A. Verdecchia
J. Faivre
T. Hakulinen
J W Coebergh
C. Martinez-Garcia
D. Forman
A. Zappone
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1, Milan, Italy. eurocare@istitutotumori.mi.it
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2001 Sep;37(13):1659-67
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Neoplasms - mortality
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics
Sex Distribution
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Abstract
The EUROCARE project analysed cancer survival data from 45 population-based cancer registries in 17 European countries, revealing wide international differences in cancer survival. We calculated 5-year relative survival for 1836287 patients diagnosed with one of 13 cancers during the period 1978-1989. The data, from 20 cancer registries in 13 countries, were grouped into four regions: Finland, Sweden, Iceland (Northern Europe); Denmark, England and Scotland (UK and Denmark); France, The Netherlands, Germany, Italy and Switzerland (Western Europe); Estonia and Poland (Eastern Europe), and broken down into four periods (1978-1980, 1981-1983, 1984-1986, 1987-1989). For each cancer, mean European and regional survival was estimated as the weighted mean of 5-year relative survival in each country. Survival increased with time for all tumours, particularly for cancers of testis (12% increase, i.e. from 79.9 to 91.9%), breast, large bowel, skin melanoma (approximately 9-10%), and lymphomas (approximately 7%). For most solid tumours, survival was highest in Northern Europe and lowest in Eastern Europe, and also low in the UK and Denmark. Regional variation was less marked for the lymphomas. Survival improved more in Western than Northern Europe, and the differences between these regions fell for bowel cancer (from 8.0% for those diagnosed in 1978-1980 to 2% for those diagnosed in 1987-1989), breast cancer (from 7.4% to 3.9%), skin melanoma (from 13.4% to 11.0%) and Hodgkin's disease (from 7.2 to 0.6%). For potentially curable malignancies such as Hodgkin's disease, large bowel, breast and testicular cancers, there were substantial increases in survival, suggesting an earlier diagnosis and more effective treatment. The persisting regional differences suggest there are corresponding differences in the availability of diagnostic and therapeutic facilities, and in the effectiveness of healthcare systems.
PubMed ID
11527693 View in PubMed
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Survival of patients with primary liver cancer, pancreatic cancer and biliary tract cancer in Europe. EUROCARE Working Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21199
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1998 Dec;34(14 Spec No):2184-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
J. Faivre
D. Forman
J. Estève
M. Obradovic
M. Sant
Author Affiliation
Côte d'Or Cancer Registry, University of Dijon, Faculté de Médecine, France.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1998 Dec;34(14 Spec No):2184-90
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biliary Tract Neoplasms - mortality
Comparative Study
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Liver Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatic Neoplasms - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics
Sex Distribution
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Abstract
The EUROCARE Study is a European Union project to assemble survival data from population-based cancer registries and analyse them according to standard procedures. We investigated and compared liver, pancreatic and biliary tract cancer survival in 17 countries from 1985 to 1989. Time trends in survival over the 1978-1989 period were also investigated in 12 countries. The overall European mean 1 year relative survival was 16% for primary liver cancer, 26% for biliary tract cancer and 15% for pancreatic cancer. The corresponding 5-year relative survival was 5, 12 and 4%, respectively. Taking the European average as the reference, the relative risk (RR) of death was at least 20% higher for the three cancers in Denmark and Estonia. Survival tended to be higher in Spain for primary liver cancer and biliary tract cancer. Gender had little influence on survival whilst age at diagnosis was inversely related to prognosis. There was an improvement in 1-year relative survival rate for primary liver cancer: relative risk (RR) of 0.68 (95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.60-0.77) for 1987-1989 versus 1978-1980 and biliary tract cancer (RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.68-0.87). There was less variation in 5-year relative survival rate over time. Some intercountry survival differences for primary liver, biliary tract and pancreatic cancers exist over Europe. Differences in quality of care, in particular treatment aggressiveness, may explain some of these differences in survival. New approaches to the management of these cancers need to be found.
PubMed ID
10070285 View in PubMed
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Survival rates for primary malignant brain tumours in Europe. EUROCARE Working Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21192
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1998 Dec;34(14 Spec No):2241-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
M. Sant
G. van der Sanden
R. Capocaccia
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1998 Dec;34(14 Spec No):2241-7
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Brain Neoplasms - mortality
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Prognosis
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics
Sex Distribution
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Abstract
In the framework of EUROCARE, a concerted action between 45 population-based cancer registries, in 17 European countries, survival of patients with primary malignant brain tumours was investigated. Survival analysis was carried out on 16,268 patients diagnosed between 1985 and 1989 and followed-up for at least 5 years. The mean European age-standardised 5-year relative survival was 17% in men and 20% in women, with minimal intercountry variations, except for markedly lower rates in Scotland, Estonia and Poland. The age-specific analysis showed a relatively uniform survival in patients aged more than 65 years at diagnosis, but there were more marked intercountry differences in younger patients. In the 15-44 year age group (25% of the total study population) 5-year relative survival ranged between 55% (Finland and Sweden) and 27% (Poland). Generally, survival decreased with increasing age at diagnosis. The analysis of a temporal trend in survival was carried out on a subset of registries with available data from 1978-1989. Overall, there was an increase in survival over the considered study period, mostly confined to 1-year survival, suggesting that it was mostly related to improved diagnostic techniques. The most important survival increase occurred in the younger patients, both for 1- and 5-year survival, suggesting that younger patients have less biologically aggressive tumours, benefiting from the combined effect of diagnostic accuracy and effective therapies. The most marked survival increase was seen in England and Denmark, countries with low survival rates at the beginning of the study period, whereas in Finland and Germany, where survival was relatively high to begin with, no important temporal trend was seen.
PubMed ID
10070294 View in PubMed
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